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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents, wanted a bit of advice.

My wife and I are going on a RYA skipper training course in Southampton at the beginning of February.

The weather is predicted to be 7-10 C , wind speed is about 12-30 mph (depending on day/time).

What should we wear ? I have been yachting in the summer in Greece but that's obviously a different world :))

We are thinking: thermal underwear (merino/synthetic) , fleece shirts and goose down jacket (??) , with a yachtring water repellant coat / trousers on top. Shoes - Timerland tourist types (maybe will buy proper winter sailing ones but not sure), gloves (what kind ?) , wool beanie hat.

Wife thinks to put on skiing trousers on top of the underwear.

Please advise. I guess people from the East Coast US would have about the same weather now in terms of conditions so all advice is appreciated.

thanks, Andrey
 

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Forget the ski gear and the goose-down jacket. That stuff's not made for marine conditions. Get the best foulies you can. In additiona to H-H, Henri Lloyd, Gil and Musto all make fine products. Use synthetic fleece products for warmth with good base and mid-layers. Gloves are tough. It's damned near impossible to sail in ski gloves. I've tried. You should be able to get some neoprene gloves at your a marine outfitter. Wear a fleece hat. You may want ski goggles. For footwear, get some deck boots. Dubarry make the top of the line, but cheap rubber deck wellies will do the job, too.

This advice assumes you are sailing on a sizeable boat. If you are dinghy sailing, you'll need a good drysuit.

EDIT: If you're going to be offshore, forget the normal life jacket. Get auto-inflating suspenders with a tether and clip in. If you go over the side, your life may be measured in minutes.
 

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Wear warm layers under a windproof top. Don't wear goose down, if its wet its useless, if you fall overboard it will kill you. Skip the ski pants but wear thermal underwear top and bottom. Wear something that can zip high up your neck but don't wear a scarf. You will need shoes that have a REAL deck shoe sole. I know normal deck shoes may not be warm enough and you may have to go to some kind of boot but its important that they be designed to maintain grip on a boat deck. Don't wear them outside to break them in if you can avoid it, its not good to have tiny rocks and debris caught in the tight tread of a boat shoe because it scratches the deck and limits your grip.
 

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Wear warm layers under a windproof top. Don't wear goose down, if its wet its useless, if you fall overboard it will kill you. Skip the ski pants but wear thermal underwear top and bottom. Wear something that can zip high up your neck but don't wear a scarf. You will need shoes that have a REAL deck shoe sole. I know normal deck shoes may not be warm enough and you may have to go to some kind of boot but its important that they be designed to maintain grip on a boat deck. Don't wear them outside to break them in if you can avoid it, its not good to have tiny rocks and debris caught in the tight tread of a boat shoe because it scratches the deck and limits your grip.
Gill seems to be a popular boot from what I've seen:

https://www.gillna.com/footwear/909.php
 

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What I wear:

Thermal underwear - synthetic. Cotton gets too clammy. Silk doesn't last well enough.

Shirt. Warm brushed cotton. Either guernsey sweater (oiled wool) or fleece. Waterproof jacket with lots of easily accessible pockets in which I can carry, knife, tool, biscuits, sweets, lip salve. Gloves - fingerless with mitten tops in neoprene. Hat - oiled wool tea cosy type which stays on my head.

Cord trousers (anything but denim which is horrible when wet). Waterproof over-trousers.

Sealskinz socks - waterproof and warm (and they won't rot your toes). Jelly shoes with cleated bottoms - because you may need to step in the water. Onboard they come off and I wear neoprene bootees with a grip on the bottom - over the socks. Warm feet = happy sailor :).

Lip salve. Moisturiser. Thermos flask with coffee. Compass. Whistle (on cord round neck). Torch. Sunglasses (if you're lucky). And a big grin :)
 

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Lip salve. Moisturiser. Thermos flask with coffee. Compass. Whistle (on cord round neck). Torch. Sunglasses (if you're lucky). And a big grin :)
I forgot about that ! I always have a whistle around my neck and when offshore I wear the whistle along with my mirror reflector on a lanyard around my neck as well! The whistle is louder than a scream and the higher frequency works better for listeners determining where you are.

For the original poster: "Stay on the boat" is rule #1 obviously!
 

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I forgot about that ! I always have a whistle around my neck and when offshore I wear the whistle along with my mirror reflector on a lanyard around my neck as well! The whistle is louder than a scream and the higher frequency works better for listeners determining where you are.

For the original poster: "Stay on the boat" is rule #1 obviously!
"One hand for you, one hand for the vessel" and
"Red right return*" are two of my most helpful rules.

* Channels are marked by red nuns and green cans, you always want to keep the red nuns on your starboard (right) side when returning to port.
 

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Not being a yachtsman, I am sure there is a great reason, that certainly escapes my notice, for no one recommending what seems to me to be the most obvious suggestion/recommendation. Why not reshedule your course for warmer times and more hospitable/survivable conditions, Khnelben? ;)
 

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Not being a yachtsman, I am sure there is a great reason, that certainly escapes my notice, for no one recommending what seems to me to be the most obvious suggestion/recommendation. Why not reshedule your course for warmer times and more hospitable/survivable conditions, Khnelben? ;)
This thought crossed my mind as well. I am quite curious to know what attracted you to go sailing under these conditions. If you do go, here's wishing you a safe passage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well

this weather is as good as any - 9-10 C is a picnic if compared to Moscow -5 C .

I just had some time for a holiday and thought "what the heck" . I had Gibraltar as an option but unfortunately I do not have an open visa to Spain.

And we like adventures.

And, yes, I am in Moscow , Russia.

Andrey
 

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Wool "longies" and Musto foulies. Gill or musto sea boots and wool socks. It's always colder than you think. Bring spares.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Guys ...

thanks again for the advice. We passed and got our Day Skippers licenses.

It wa shard work - with studies and exams (and it all being in English - not that Russian helps much as all our marine terminologu is in Dutch) but we did it.

In terms of clothing : we wore thermal HH underwear (merino+synthetic) , wooly sweater with neck, yachting waterproof coat (XM Yachting) and a pair of skiing trousers. I wore a pair of Timberland tourist boots - Masha wore a pair of yachting no-slip wellies (heels marked red and green :)) ). Socks fleece.

And it was cords and deck shoes at the pub ;))

Andrey

P.S. Musto is sooo expensive. But I have seen people wear Musto, Helly Hansen and Lloyds .
 

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Bravo

On the qualification. Hope you were suitably wrapped up. I have messed about on boats in the area much of my young life and the solent aint funny in Feb.
Still miss it tho.
Havent got my Henri Lloyds wet for 5 years.
 
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