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I know Trads pride themselves in their thrifting, but as the holidays approach, would you ever think of giving a fellow Trad a thrifted gift? Why or why not?
 

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If the item was something that I thought the other person would want to have, why not? It's the thought that counts. I'd have to know the person well enough to be certain that they weren't squeamish about "pre-owned" clothing, however.

I should add that the items I purchase from thrift stores are usually nearly indistinguishable from new, not that I'd try to pass them off as such.
 

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In my family, thrifted items are not only OK, but welcome. We do a gift exchange wherein numbers go into a hat and the numbers drawn determine the order in which wrapped presents are selected. After unwrapping, you have the option of keeping the present or swapping with someone else who went before you. Therefore, it's best to go last because you can pick anything. There's a $20 limit, and you buy as if you're buying for yourself, because you may end up with it--in fact, most of us usually hope we do end up with what we bought. Thrifted gifts are always best and most coveted--twenty bucks buys hardly anything new, but it's a fortune in a thrift store. Years later, we're all still still wearing classic Scottish sweaters, using top-quality German carving knives, gazing at fine pen-and-ink drawings created by lord knows who. Brand-new gifts would have been tossed long ago. Most of us go thrifting, and we're on the look-out year-round--it's not unusual to get a gift-exchange gift in February or July. Not everyone can do this, of course, but it sure works for us and makes Christmas shopping fun instead of a chore.
 

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32rollandrock's answer is awesome!

(And that is the very first time that I have ever used that word.)

I, too, would welcome a thrifted gift, and my family routinely exchange used goods we've acquired, ranging from artwork and first editions to sweaters.
 

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Why on earth would you insult someone with something SECOND HAND unless it were a piece of silverware etc.

Thrift = second hand, ask yourslef that question, if something special say a 1945 suit becuase they collect such things fine, otherwise don't insult them.
 

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I give thrifted items but also a more standard "new" gift to the same person. I don't think family members who receive thrifted gifts are insulted. They seem to like them and thrifting makes it possible to give things which would otherwise be beyond the financial means of the giver.
 

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I thrifted two ties already as gifts for my dad and brother. In fact one came from Reddington.
 

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Pesonally, I would not gift a second hand piece of clothing. But, that is just because I wouldn't want to make them uncomfortable if used clothing were not in their reality. Durable goods are another story. Vintage cuff-links, watches, tie-clips or antique glassware, etc. seem fine to me.

Why on earth would you insult someone with something SECOND HAND unless it were a piece of silverware etc.

Thrift = second hand, ask yourslef that question, if something special say a 1945 suit becuase they collect such things fine, otherwise don't insult them.
I don't see how it would be an insult. If someone wanted to give me a second-hand 1969 GTO I wouldn't feel insulted at all! :icon_smile_big: A gift is after all a gift and if you feel insulted by the gift you receive then maybe your sense of entitlement needs a good insult.

I know people who think that it's "gross" to wear second hand clothing. I just tell them to get over themselves.
I they think your wearing second hand clothing is gross then you are right. If they are talking about wearing second hand themselves then it is you that needs to get over himself.
 

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Pesonally, I would not gift a second hand piece of clothing. But, that is just because I wouldn't want to make them uncomfortable if used clothing were not in their reality. Durable goods are another story. Vintage cuff-links, watches, tie-clips or antique glassware, etc. seem fine to me.

I don't see how it would be an insult. If someone wanted to give me a second-hand 1969 GTO I wouldn't feel insulted at all! :icon_smile_big: A gift is after all a gift and if you feel insulted by the gift you receive then maybe your sense of entitlement needs a good insult.

I they think your wearing second hand clothing is gross then you are right. If they are talking about wearing second hand themselves then it is you that needs to get over himself.
I don't have a problem with second hand merchandise...I don't agree with their thinking. Sometimes they have their nose in the air a little too high.
 

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I don't see how it would be an insult. If someone wanted to give me a second-hand 1969 GTO I wouldn't feel insulted at all! :icon_smile_big: A gift is after all a gift and if you feel insulted by the gift you receive then maybe your sense of entitlement needs a good insult.

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If you actually trouble to read what I said I specifically excluded items such as silverware etc whose value often comes from antiquity or age. A GTO is in exactly that vein. This is about second hand clothes and that is pretty insulting on the part of the donor unless some period piece which the recipient cllects..
 

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If you actually trouble to read what I said I specifically excluded items such as silverware etc whose value often comes from antiquity or age. A GTO is in exactly that vein. This is about second hand clothes and that is pretty insulting on the part of the donor unless some period piece which the recipient cllects..
I realize that the GTO was in that vein, hence the big grin. :icon_smile_big: The point I was making, which you apparantly still don't see, is that if someone actually took the trouble to think about giving you a gift, the least you could do is be gracious and accept that fact; second hand or not. They obviously thought the item suited you in some manner and not necessarily in an insulting one. There is an old saying "Accepting the gift honors the giver." To do otherwise, or doing so in a poor manner, is an insult from you to them!
 

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I realize that the GTO was in that vein, hence the big grin. :icon_smile_big: The point I was making, which you apparantly still don't see, is that if someone actually took the trouble to think about giving you a gift, the least you could do is be gracious and accept that fact; second hand or not. They obviously thought the item suited you in some manner and not necessarily in an insulting one. There is an old saying "Accepting the gift honors the giver." To do otherwise, or doing so in a poor manner, is an insult from you to them!
Were such a thing to happen one would always be gracious in acceptance - then quietly dispose of the thing and note my private thoughts for the future.
 

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I realize that the GTO was in that vein, hence the big grin. :icon_smile_big: The point I was making, which you apparantly still don't see, is that if someone actually took the trouble to think about giving you a gift, the least you could do is be gracious and accept that fact; second hand or not. They obviously thought the item suited you in some manner and not necessarily in an insulting one. There is an old saying "Accepting the gift honors the giver." To do otherwise, or doing so in a poor manner, is an insult from you to them!
If I was rich (and some of us are) of course I'd buy new. For the rest of us, how many would prefer a new Sonoma/Faded Glory/St. John's Bay sweater over a like-new Alan Paine? The former never gets worn and ends up in a junk store. Bottom line, you have to know your audience, and if they insist on new and you're not loaded, buy booze--it always fits. I'm fortunate that I can get away with used. One of the best parts about our gift exchange: Invariably, neophytes--co-workers, significant others, etc.--get invited and, thinking this is lke the office Christmas party, show up with their Wal-Mart flashlights, lottery tickets, made-in-China tumblers. Then they see the Pendleton blankets, Stetson hats, crystal, et al and their faces light up. Again, not for everyone, but works for me.
 

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In my family, thrifted items are not only OK, but welcome. We do a gift exchange wherein numbers go into a hat and the numbers drawn determine the order in which wrapped presents are selected. After unwrapping, you have the option of keeping the present or swapping with someone else who went before you. Therefore, it's best to go last because you can pick anything. There's a $20 limit, and you buy as if you're buying for yourself, because you may end up with it--in fact, most of us usually hope we do end up with what we bought. Thrifted gifts are always best and most coveted--twenty bucks buys hardly anything new, but it's a fortune in a thrift store. Years later, we're all still still wearing classic Scottish sweaters, using top-quality German carving knives, gazing at fine pen-and-ink drawings created by lord knows who. Brand-new gifts would have been tossed long ago. Most of us go thrifting, and we're on the look-out year-round--it's not unusual to get a gift-exchange gift in February or July. Not everyone can do this, of course, but it sure works for us and makes Christmas shopping fun instead of a chore.
What a terrific family you must have!
 

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In my family, thrifted items are not only OK, but welcome. We do a gift exchange wherein numbers go into a hat and the numbers drawn determine the order in which wrapped presents are selected. After unwrapping, you have the option of keeping the present or swapping with someone else who went before you. Therefore, it's best to go last because you can pick anything. There's a $20 limit, and you buy as if you're buying for yourself, because you may end up with it--in fact, most of us usually hope we do end up with what we bought. Thrifted gifts are always best and most coveted--twenty bucks buys hardly anything new, but it's a fortune in a thrift store. Years later, we're all still still wearing classic Scottish sweaters, using top-quality German carving knives, gazing at fine pen-and-ink drawings created by lord knows who. Brand-new gifts would have been tossed long ago. Most of us go thrifting, and we're on the look-out year-round--it's not unusual to get a gift-exchange gift in February or July. Not everyone can do this, of course, but it sure works for us and makes Christmas shopping fun instead of a chore.
And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how it is done. :thumbs-up:
 
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