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I have a wool grenadine tie that I like very much for autumn and winter, only I noticed the other day what looked like a small stain in a light coloured area of the tie. I blotted and minimally wiped it with sponge (which unfortunately puffed some individual wool fibres up and out of the weave - wrong decision), but above all I now realise that it may have been a snag of pull in the weave that was causing the discolouration in the first place.

I know grenadine is a complex weave, and to my eye it looks like some of the black coloured threads have gotten out of their regular position, and so have changed the tie's appearance to the eye. Some appear to have bunched up, another to have disappeared down into the weave.Could any experts here have a look at the attached photos and give some advice? Is it a snag in the weave, and can it be fixed by someone who knows what they are doing? Or is the tie done for at this point? Any advice or explanation much appreciated. I've attached photos of the tie from three different distances.

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Typical grenadine…my favorite tie fabric but the snags are a bitch. Try poking them back through; if that fails…retire if it bugs you. I've had more than a couple of my grenadines go out of service far too early.
 

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The snags and the stain may be two separate things. Hard to tell without examining the tie physically. I have had reasonable success in repairing snags and pulls in wool cothing (ties, sweaters and jackets) with a toothpick or other similar instrument but with some thickness and not too sharp a point. What works for me is what @smmrfld suggested: Poking carefully and pressing down with a finger until the snag disappears sufficiently so that a uniform look is achieved on the outer surface. The idea is to take the pulled thread from the outer surface and push into the inner surface where it will not be visible. Once I have done my best, I also use a steamer very lightly to even things out and plump up the fibres just a tad. Good luck!
 

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I may be missing something but I don't see a pull, the small fuzziness is normal.- If you do have a pull or snag here is how to make the repair - needs patience...
Grenadine Repair Video

Also you should email the maker for advice about the stain.

Normally you would have an expert dry cleaner take care of the stain - someone like Tie Crafter in New York.
 

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I may be missing something but I don't see a pull, the small fuzziness is normal.- If you do have a pull or snag here is how to make the repair - needs patience...
Grenadine Repair Video

Also you should email the maker for advice about the stain.

Normally you would have an expert dry cleaner take care of the stain - someone like Tie Crafter in New York.
Excellent video! I have always used a toothpick or pointed instrument somewhat thicker than a regular needle to do this repair, and not just for grenadine ties, but for other items of clothing which have snags or pulled threads. I will have to try your method with a standard needle and thread the next time. I can see how the thread attached to the needle being drawn through the snag can help to push the snag back into the material. And I agree: Patience is certainly a virtue here!
 
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