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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put together a list of events I would wear a tuxedo to. I want to start wearing mine more often. It seems perfectly acceptable, in my opinion, to wear a tux at:

A gala/fundraiser
A gathering held in one's honor
A boxing match
A fine restaurant
The H.S. prom: someone's date
The symphony/a play/fine arts performance
Someone's wedding
My wedding
A casino (we have several casinos in New Mexico)
A New Year's Eve gathering

Please enlighten me when and where you wear yours
 

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I put together a list of events I would wear a tuxedo to. I want to start wearing mine more often. It seems perfectly acceptable, in my opinion, to wear a tux at:

A gala/fundraiser
A gathering held in one's honor
A boxing match
A fine restaurant
The H.S. prom: someone's date
The symphony/a play/fine arts performance
Someone's wedding
My wedding
A casino (we have several casinos in New Mexico)
A New Year's Eve gathering

Please enlighten me when and where you wear yours
About the third one... are you Michael Buffer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
In re. to no. 3: I imagine myself sitting high in the stands, perhaps with binoculars in one hand and a shot glass in the other.

It never crossed my mind to wear a tuxedo at an Ultimate Fighting event. I wouldn't get caught dead with such rift raft. Did I tell you guys about my recent encounter with an Ultimate Pillow-Biter, I mean Fighter? :rolleyes: Those guys are very rude. No fight, just an exchange of words. He was boasting that Ultimate Fighting was tougher than boxing, and pretty much just laying it on boxing. So, I spoke up and said no respectable fighter would consider doing "mixed-martial arts." It kind of fell on deaf ears, but I should know better than to throw pearls to swine.
 

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Formal nights on a cruise still see the odd DJ wearer. I wore one to the first home game ever for the old Charlotte Hornets.

In re: the boxer. I'd wager any competent pro boxer would lay out an ultimate fighter before he got his first kick off.
 

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I wear my dress lounge suit to:

  • Formal Parties
  • Formal Dinners
  • The Opera
  • Evening Weddings
  • At Receptions Where The Invitations Call For "Creative Cocktail Attire," whatever the heck that is supposed to mean

--Chase
 

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So sometimes you wear white tie and sometimes black tie. I assume you have the choice of wearing either or?
No, the dress code is always prescribed, depending on the event and the specific Masonic body.

The most common are:
  • Pennsylania Masonic Dress (tails with a black vest, white shirt with turndown collar and a black bowtie
  • White tie and tails (Scottish Rite)
  • Tuxedo with black tie (most invitational orders, e.g. Red Cross of Constantine and Allied Masonic Degrees)
  • Stroller/English Masonic Dress (Masonic orders based in England, e.g. The Operatives and The Commemorative Order of St. Thomas of Acon)
There are also a few things where you can just wear a suit.
 

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  • At Receptions Where The Invitations Call For "Creative Cocktail Attire," whatever the heck that is supposed to mean
When issuing invitations specifying "Creative Cocktail Attire," it's best to have an accurate assessment of whether any of your guests will show up in drag, and whether they're any good at it.

Ugly cross-dressers can just kill a good party.
 

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Opening night of the opera
Technically, the opera's opening night is for white tie, at least for a major performance.

A relatively short search of fine arts events in my area turned up quite the list - far more than I would have ever thought and more than I can possibly attend. If I wanted to I could wear black tie to a public event (recitals, concerts, symphonies - at least four professional symphony orchestras within 45 minutes, plays, festivals, musicals, opera) probably almost every night, perhaps less during summer. When I do go black tie (and the wife stunningly dressed) we get what seem to be approving looks and a few compliments. Look around and live it up. I even found a couple white tie events I can attend.

pbc
 

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Technically, the opera's opening night is for white tie, at least for a major performance.
pbc
As far as was explained to me for opera dress by the former opera critic of The New Yorker (I went one time and we happened to be in the same box), white tie at the Met is generally reserved for:
1) Opening night of the season
2) Opening night of a new, previously unperformed (at the Met) production (either never-before performed classic or a newly written opera)

Black tie is the standard:
1) At any white tie occasion, where black tie is an acceptable substitute
2) At any opening night performance

And black tie is technically correct, but seen less often at:
1) Any other "regular" performance.
 

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It is interesting to see how white tie, and then black tie, slowly drifted from everyday requirement to virtual obscurity. From my limited reading (feel free to correct), I believe it happened thus:

In the beginning, one wore white tie daily to dinner and any other evening (non-work) function.
Then only if a lady was present. (Otherwise, black tie such as at the club.)
Then only if going out.
Then only if it includes a performance.
Then only to the opera.
Then only a box seat at the opera.
Then only opening night at the opera.
Then only opening night for a big performance of a famous opera company.
Now hardly even then.

These, of course, exclude private functions, receptions, private balls, charity events, awards/recognition ceremonies, etc. which have followed the same trend. Black tie took over from each of the above and is likewise being slowly abandoned.

It might be easier to find what evening event didn't traditionally call for black tie: anything at church or work or anything dirty. Black tie was even normal at the beginning of the 20th century for dinner at home without guests (according to Emily Post and others). There is quite a bit of traditional precedence for wearing black tie to just about any evening event.

To add to the excellent list so far:
Your own musical performance/recital.
Your own artistic debut/display/presentation.
Your own party, birthday or otherwise.
 
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