Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Punchline: When he's an actor!

Not funny? OK, when is an actor not an actor? When he's a shoemaker! :laughing:

Neither is funny? Hmm . . . :icon_scratch:

But each is instructive! As literal fact. The recent film The Phantom Thread set amidst the world of haut couture features two actor/shoemaker-shoemaker/actors. One of the characters, Nigel Cheddar-Goode, is portrayed by an actor who's day job is as owner and bespoke shoemaker of George Cleverley and Co., namely, George Glasgow. -

https://www.claymoorslist.com/2018/...om-thread-by-rebecca-mead-the-new-yorker.html

And as many no doubt know, Daniel Day-Lewis also has a day job, as he took a 5 year sabbatical to apprentice himself to Italian bespoke shoemaker, the late Stefano Bemer. -

And since Mr. Day-Lewis has announced his retirement after this most recent film, perhaps we can all look forward to offering our patronage for his footwear! ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Interesting story. Thanks Flanderian. I saw the movie last week. Unfortunately it did not live up to my expectations.
I'm liberal and wide ranging in my tastes for fiction, but it just didn't have much dramatic effect for me. Rather than trying to suspend disbelief, I was unsuccessful in suspending my yuck factor for the protagonist. Daniel Day-Lewis is a great actor but this fellow just sort floated away on the vapors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,325 Posts
One can only speculate on the connection between acting and making shoes. Obviously, most thespians spend a lot of time "resting".
At one time I knew an actress who seemed to spend a lot of time resting. During those intervals, she worked in a children's shoe shop in Islington. She may have been responsible for a whole generation of north London children growing up with bad feet.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
Critically acclaimed or not, the central theme of The Phantom Thread strikes close enough to home to warrant watching the film. Perhaps a decade and a half back there was a shoe repair shop in Chesterton, IN; run by an extremely talented gentleman in his mid to late 70's. I spent more than just a little time in his shop talking with him about his shop and life experiences and was in the process of talking him in to taking me on as an unpaid apprentice. Before we could make this happen, he closed the shop and entered into local politics, of all things. I found myself forced to give up my dream of going into shoe repair and became a bookseller at Barnes& Noble. LOL. ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One can only speculate on the connection between acting and making shoes. Obviously, most thespians spend a lot of time "resting".
At one time I knew an actress who seemed to spend a lot of time resting. During those intervals, she worked in a children's shoe shop in Islington. She may have been responsible for a whole generation of north London children growing up with bad feet.
Acting as a living seems the most unsure of professions. Due to the NYC market for actors there are more than a few that make their homes in our general area, and a common joke is that an employed actor is a waste of a good waiter as that is a common living between paying roles. And it's not necessarily for a lack of talent or effort that it's so difficult, as so often the deciding factor seems just plain luck.

Critically acclaimed or not, the central theme of The Phantom Thread strikes close enough to home to warrant watching the film. Perhaps a decade and a half back there was a shoe repair shop in Chesterton, IN; run by an extremely talented gentleman in his mid to late 70's. I spent more than just a little time in his shop talking with him about his shop and life experiences and was in the process of talking him in to taking me on as an unpaid apprentice. Before we could make this happen, he closed the shop and entered into local politics, of all things. I found myself forced to give up my dream of going into shoe repair and became a bookseller at Barnes& Noble. LOL. ;)
Well, if the world lost a shoemaker, I'm sure it gained a great bookseller! :icon_hailthee:
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
^^I did eventually find myself employed by a local shoe store selling shoes for a brief period of time. Alas, while I seem to truly enjoy buying shoes for myself, I never experienced the same level(s) of joy selling shoes to other people! LOL. :(
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
The superb blogger of Tweedland offers a a trio of articles about the film The Phantom Thread.

https://tweedlandthegentlemansclub.blogspot.com/2018/03/phantom-thread-video-phantom-thread.html

The first is a review of the film, the last about how those who worked in haut couture view its dealing with their milieu. But it is the 2nd which most interests me which describes costuming the protagonist in which we learn that Anderson and Sheppard received the responsibility. Mr. Day-Lewis is an enviable coat rack and displays their work to fine advantage. And while I should be ashamed to admit it :oops:, it is that and the period world created which I found the most enjoyable aspects of the film.








 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top