Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Though uncredited, I'm fairly certain that the beautiful suit below is by Seoul bespoke tailor, B&Tailor, and that the young man wearing it so well is a tailor there and a son of their master tailor, Jung Yul Park. I do not know his name. I was going to say I think he looks good, but he doesn't, he looks great! But could he look even better? :icon_scratch:

What he's done is pick out the colors in the overplaid of his suit in both his tie and socks. And they match very closely. It gives his entire ensemble much more visual interest, and a very cohesive, smart look. Nothing wrong with it, it looks great. Polo in the '70's and '80's used this secondary color matching to great effect when designing their clothes.

But as good as he looks, he might possibly look even better. If there's one thing that might be improved, it's that the matches are a bit too perfect. Too pat. The tie cleverly picks up both colors in the fairly subtle overplaid almost exactly, and the socks echo the ground color of the tie.

What if we fuzz it up a bit? Play around with tonal contrast instead of exact matches, complimentary harmonies, or a tie that picks up one of the colors of the overplaied, but instead of matching the second includes shades in complimentary harmonies. I think what we'd find is that it all becomes much more visually interesting, that our eyes will dance about the harmonies as they tell a much richer story, and Jung Yul Park's son becomes an even more intriguing subject.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
Though uncredited, I'm fairly certain that the beautiful suit below is by Seoul bespoke tailor, B&Tailor, and that the young man wearing it so well is a tailor there and a son of their master tailor, Jung Yul Park. I do not know his name. I was going to say I think he looks good, but he doesn't, he looks great! But could he look even better? :icon_scratch:

What he's done is pick out the colors in the overplaid of his suit in both his tie and socks. And they match very closely. It gives his entire ensemble much more visual interest, and a very cohesive, smart look. Nothing wrong with it, it looks great. Polo in the '70's and '80's used this secondary color matching to great effect when designing their clothes.

But as good as he looks, he might possibly look even better. If there's one thing that might be improved, it's that the matches are a bit too perfect. Too pat. The tie cleverly picks up both colors in the fairly subtle overplaid almost exactly, and the socks echo the ground color of the tie.

What if we fuzz it up a bit? Play around with tonal contrast instead of exact matches, complimentary harmonies, or a tie that picks up one of the colors of the overplaied, but instead of matching the second includes shades in complimentary harmonies. I think what we'd find is that it all becomes much more visually interesting, that our eyes will dance about the harmonies as they tell a much richer story, and Jung Yul Park's son becomes an even more intriguing subject.

I think he looks darn good. Agree though a slight bit of play with color might make it more visually appealing. I prefer to come close in color of my socks to that of the trousers, a shade or two up or down with a pattern that would still pull it together . Pocket square in complimentary colors to break things up a bit. Otherwise, hard to to pick apart.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I think he looks darn good. Agree though a slight bit of play with color might make it more visually appealing. I prefer to come close in color of my socks to that of the trousers, a shade or two up or down with a pattern that would still pull it together . Pocket square in complimentary colors to break things up a bit. Otherwise, hard to to pick apart.
Lot's of good choices in hose. F. R. Tripler used to be my place for hose that was to be worn with business suits. They sold beautifully made English sized hose of the best quality Merino wool for cooler seasons, and cotton lisle for warmer. Two of my favorite shades were ruby and silver grey. The ruby was a rich compliment to most suits, and if a similar color was repeated anywhere else, even better. The silver grey picked up the stripe in virtually any striped cloth. Those along with navy, charcoal and black would suffice for most.
And best yet, both navy and charcoal could be had with clocking! :pirate:

And none of this was presented as novel, or fashion, this was just the way well dressed men had been dressing.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
As seen below, hose was once rife with clocking and other patterns. Though that depicted here is a little more exuberant than the fairly restrained versions I favored. The design was the traditional small circle in a small square (Thought to resemble the face of a clock, and from whence the name derived.) that repeated single file up the side of each.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
I think the tie is perfect as is. You can easily get into trouble trying too hard with harmonizing complimentary colors.

I would prefer the socks in a similar shade of grey with a noticeable pattern of the secondary colors of the suit.

I would save attempts at harmonizing complementary colors to the PS. It’s more subtle and there is less of a chance of it being a close fail and appearing discordant.

This truly is gilding the Lilly.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Another thought on the art of putting one's self together just popped into my head (Plenty of room, you know!) is Richard Merkin's quote on the issue, "Somewhere, like in Krazy Kat, you've got to throw the brick.".

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/13/us/13merkin.html

And unlike fake Sprezzatura, with contrived sloppiness, where everyone does the same silly thing, he's talking about the color that is slightly discordant, or the shape, or the mode, because perfection is boring.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top