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Sort of relevant to the Joe Frances' post:

https://askandyaboutclothes.com/community/showthread.php?t=88885

Where he talks about sending a written Thank You... I'm just looking for any kind of thanks:

I'm a little appalled at the too often experience lately of giving a gift but not even getting the slightest recognition that the gift was received much less a simple "thank you".

Maybe it's the season or people are just "too busy". A written note is the ultimate, but just (in my case) a simple e-mail or phone call would do!!
 

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I have been noticing the same thing. Like you, I am not looking for people to kiss my feet in gratitude (they would ruin the shine on my shoes :icon_smile_big:), but just a simple acknowledgment that the gift was received. This happens with everyone it seems. From family to business associates. Good friends to casual acquaintances. My personal feeling is that it all stems from a worldwide lack of respect. Self-respect as well as respect for others. It seems to be just another symptom of the 'whatever' epidemic that has swept the planet. This forum addresses another symptom.

btw, Thank you Andy for providing this fantastic resource!
 

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I'm a little appalled at the too often experience lately of giving a gift but not even getting the slightest recognition that the gift was received much less a simple "thank you".

Maybe it's the season or people are just "too busy". A written note is the ultimate, but just (in my case) a simple e-mail or phone call would do!!
My mother's sister passed away twelve years ago, leaving a husband and a ten-year-old son. The father has a bizarre sense of selfish entitlement, and he's passed this on to his kid.

My mother would put together gift boxes for his birthday and Christmas - clothes, toys, all sorts of things. She would cart it to the post office and ship it out in plenty of time.

She'd talk to him on Christmas day and the following conversation became all too familiar.

"Did you get the box?"

"Yeah..."

"Have you opened it?"

"Nah, it's down in the garage..."

She finally stopped feeling a sense of responsibility and dropped him from the gift list.

One of her cousins also doesn't acknowledge gifts. She has three kids, so you'd think maybe she's too busy, but her father revealed that she wants to go back to work because she's so "bored."

I'm always amazed at how these blatently ungrateful people express their confusion about why they don't have any friends.
 

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Yeah, like when I wish someone well (to his/her face) and they don't say "Thank you." And this is somewhat related, and more on an every day level, but I don't like when I say thank you, and the other person says, "Ok," instead of "Thank you." I never really cared for that, but I admit I have done that, and still do it sometimes. What an ugly habit to pick up.
 

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Yeah, like when I wish someone well (to his/her face) and they don't say "Thank you." And this is somewhat related, and more on an every day level, but I don't like when I say thank you, and the other person says, "Ok," instead of "Thank you." I never really cared for that, but I admit I have done that, and still do it sometimes. What an ugly habit to pick up.
What irks me in this situation is when another person, say a waiter, etc, responds to my "Thank you" with "No Problem."
 

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Parents, and maybe grandparents

I have two small children, and I have learned a lot from them and from their friends. Children really do mimic their parents. I believe that if you see someone who cannot express basic civility and politeness, you are probably meeting someone whose parents and grandparents also lacked those basic components of human interaction.

At Thanksgiving this year, my in-laws (admittedly from California) were constantly amazed at my children who at almost 4 years and 19 months constantly say please and thank you. My sister-in-law was especially shocked when my mother-in-law asked my son if he wanted a spanking, and he told her "No thank you". Honest, and polite. I couldn't ask for better.
 

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It is a breath of cool, fresh air, especially at a fast food place. One of the many reasons I have always considered Chick-Fil-A a notch above McD's et al..

Certainly beats the response of "uh huh" to a "thank you."
I'm not nearly as Christian as the Cathy family, but I do appreciate the general wholesomeness of the entire operation.
 

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The tendency to say 'thank you' disappeared at about the same time the ability to say, 'I'm sorry' atrophied.

I read an absolutely biting column in The Financial Times about the complete absence of any public apologies from any of the leaders of any of the financial institutions that have failed in the last year. Instead, the columnist complained, the public is forced to listen to endless blather from fallen tycoons about 'perfect storms', 'black swans,' 'tipping points', and (his favorite, when coming from hedge fund managers) 'regulatory failure' (his favorite, he noted, because the whole idea of a hedge fund was to avoid/evade regulation). One thing that must be said for the Japanese, their CEOs know how to apologise.

Hope I'm not hijacking the webmaster's own thread with the shift from 'thank you' to 'I'm sorry.' By the way, Andy, thanks for all your work making this place such an inviting community (and thanks to any of the moderators, etc. who also contribute).
 

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Thanks for the Memories

The quaint and antique phrase 'thank you' survives in modern times as a preface to the accompanying words 'in advance,' which means that the speaker is imposing upon you an unwelcome request, and feels not the slightest genuine gratitude.
 

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The quaint and antique phrase 'thank you' survives in modern times as a preface to the accompanying words 'in advance,' which means that the speaker is imposing upon you an unwelcome request, and feels not the slightest genuine gratitude.
When I deal with our staff in India, "thanking you in advance" is replaced by "please do the needful."

To "do the needful" sounds like a euphemism that a little kid uses when he has to go potty on a long car trip. Add to that the demanding tone, as though we're there to support them, and it requires a lot of willpower not to respond in a rude manner.
 

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When I deal with our staff in India, "thanking you in advance" is replaced by "please do the needful."
To "do the needful" sounds like a euphemism that a little kid uses when he has to go potty on a long car trip. Add to that the demanding tone, as though we're there to support them, and it requires a lot of willpower not to respond in a rude manner.


Marvellous! Yes it does, and I've had the same reaction. Sometimes one gets that South Asian tense shift, 'you will please be doing the needful.' And yes, the temptation is almost insuperable, to say '"l''ll do it right now. Are the facilities down the hall?"
 

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Marvellous! Yes it does, and I've had the same reaction. Sometimes one gets that South Asian tense shift, 'you will please be doing the needful.' And yes, the temptation is almost insuperable, to say '"l''ll do it right now. Are the facilities down the hall?"
Oh, goodness! If I'd laughed any harder I'd have done the needful right here at my desk...
 

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It might also be due to the fact that people are getting more and more selfish these days. Therefore they are looking out for themselves and stopped caring for others or acknowledging what they are doing, even if it helps them.
 
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