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Moleskin is a cloth. It's a heavy cotton flannel. Usually made up into odd trousers, which are referred to as "moleskins" for short. I've never seen them waxed; they're no more water repellent than any other cotton trouser; and they are usually quite warm (depending on the weight of the cloth).

Moleskin can also refer to a pad placed in the heel or tongue of a shoe to add friction and cut down on slippage.
 

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Moleskins tend to be heavier than other cotton trousers and are usually associated with country wear. As a result they are mainly found in tans, browns and greens, though not exclusively, and are usually cut with a fairly close leg (similar to jeans).

I wear very little else in the way of trousers in the colder months. They are super warm, comfortable and durable.
 

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Moleskins are quite thick and lose their colour easily because of this.They get creases that don't really change postion ( from wear in crotch, centre crease, crease from washing in small machine without much movement etc)....the creases stick out and wear off the fabric giving it a faded look.If washed in too small a machine you'll get a marbled looking disaster.
Thats why they are really casual comfortable-gentle outdoors type ( gardening or pretending to).The fabric is so thick...it will last for years and years .. way longer than jeans and warmer too as they have a lovely short soft nap.
 

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I have for many years assumed that the fabric "moleskin" (not to be confused with the stuff you use for blistered feet) was the same as what we commonly call in the States "chamois cloth" that is used frequently for shirts, as offered by L.L. Bean and similar firms. Am I correct in this assumption?
 

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I have for many years assumed that the fabric "moleskin" (not to be confused with the stuff you use for blistered feet) was the same as what we commonly call in the States "chamois cloth" that is used frequently for shirts, as offered by L.L. Bean and similar firms. Am I correct in this assumption?
I think so..... Although for shirts it would be a significantly lighter weight of cloth. Both moleskin and chamois cloth have a spongy suedy feel not unlike chamois leather. My dad used to polish his Ford Cortina with his. Chamois Leather (pron: 'shammy Leather') that is not his moleskins...
 

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I have for many years assumed that the fabric "moleskin" (not to be confused with the stuff you use for blistered feet) was the same as what we commonly call in the States "chamois cloth" that is used frequently for shirts, as offered by L.L. Bean and similar firms. Am I correct in this assumption?
My chamois shirts seem a lot softer and thicker than my moleskin pants.
 

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Moleskin is a heavy cotton cloth. Trousers are usually made from this material for rural pursuits.

It is not normally waxed or otherwise treated although I daresay someone will have tried it..
 

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Hemingway - Moleskine

This must be different right ? LOL

For two centuries now Moleskine (mol-a-skeen') has been the legendary notebook of artists, writers, intellectuals and travelers. From gifted artists Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), to poet and leader of the surrealist movement André Breton (1896-1966) to Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) considered the most influential writer of the last century, to famous travel writer Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989).
 

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Lambourne and others

I have a pair of Lambournes (commonly seen on STP) that are extremely heavy and full, such that I rarely wear them. I have others that are much lighter and cut like denim.
Which weights do your moleskins have?
 

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This must be different right ? LOL

For two centuries now Moleskine (mol-a-skeen') has been the legendary notebook of artists, writers, intellectuals and travelers. From gifted artists Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), to poet and leader of the surrealist movement André Breton (1896-1966) to Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) considered the most influential writer of the last century, to famous travel writer Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989).
Unrelated. Moleskine is a brand of notebooks; moleskin is a cotton fabric.
 

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This must be different right ? LOL

For two centuries now Moleskine (mol-a-skeen') has been the legendary notebook of artists, writers, intellectuals and travelers. From gifted artists Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), to poet and leader of the surrealist movement André Breton (1896-1966) to Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) considered the most influential writer of the last century, to famous travel writer Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989).
Yes, I have a few Moleskine journals I keep for, well, journaling. I love them, the paper, the binding, the way my oens and oencils flow on them. But they're certainly not the pants we speak of.

I have a pair of black moleskin pants and a Hickey sportcoat in choc brown moleskin...love them both!
 

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Bookster has Moleskin

Bookster has moleskin pants and corduroy as well. I am exceedingly pleased with my first pair and am ordering more.

Over the years I have had moleskins from other sources. I believe the Booksters to be superior as to quality of cloth and attention to construction. The test pair is standing up well to hard wear and repeated machine washing and drying.

Moreover, Bookster will make pants to your specification, which in my case means I can actually get casual pants that I can wear comfortably.

Check out their web site.

Regards,
Gurdon
 
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