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We're honored to have a new Tutorial (all tutorials are linked from the Home Page) on Watch Collecting! It's by Sig Shonholtz of www.adventoftime.com

Sig is an expert in antique watches, belongs to all the right watch industry associations, and you may have seen him appraising watches on the Antiques Road Show!

 

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Does my drawer full of broken watches count?
 

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Which vintage Japanese watch

Mr Shonholtz or anyone else do you have an opinion about these watches with regard to the style, quality of the movements and collectability?

At the moment I'm leaning towards the Citizen Super Ace or the Seiko Marvel.

1. Citizen Super Ace 1963


2. Citizen Super Deluxe 1962


3. Seiko Lord Marvel 1958~1960


4. Seiko Marvel 1956


5. Seiko Unique 1957
 

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Ooh, perfect! I just recently got into watches and ordered a dressy automatic Vostok Partner off eBay just last week; I can't wait to get it in the mail.

Although I'm more interested in modern-day watches, vintages are pretty cool to have too. :icon_smile:
 

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I Agree!!!

We should have watches as a category on AAAC.
:icon_smile_big:

Gentelmen;

I wholeheartedly concur, a watch & maybe a pen forum would be super additions. ;)

Be Seeing You!
Pitt 84
 

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Rolex

They count for something, but it is probably the brands they are, that will count the most.

It looks like this will be interesting answering your watch and watch band questions.
I have an operable 1945 18 karat gold rolex oyster perpetual with a leather band. I have no idea what this watch may be worth. There is a little fading on the face, but not bad. Likewise, if something breaks can I get it fixed, and if so, who would I take it to in San Diego?
 

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You are way ahead of the curve on Seiko, most people would snear, but stick to your guns and wear it with pride. I think those three watches are very classical. I like the first one the best as it appears to be in the best condition. I am sure they are not expensive but they are very sophisticated. I am also not sure about parts availability. Enjoy it.
 

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You are way ahead of the curve on Seiko, most people would snear, but stick to your guns and wear it with pride. I think those three watches are very classical. I like the first one the best as it appears to be in the best condition. I am sure they are not expensive but they are very sophisticated. I am also not sure about parts availability. Enjoy it.
When you say you like the first one the best,
Do you mean the first Seiko, the Lord Marvel?
Or
Do you mean the first picture, Citizen Super Ace?

Thanks a lot for your input.
 

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I have an operable 1945 18 karat gold rolex oyster perpetual with a leather band. I have no idea what this watch may be worth. There is a little fading on the face, but not bad. Likewise, if something breaks can I get it fixed, and if so, who would I take it to in San Diego?
If it is in fact a 1945 18k oyster perpetual it would be an 18k bubbleback (does the back in fact bubble out?), one of the more desirable vintage watches. At the peak of their popularity in the late 80's these were going for $4k-5k. Now dealers still ask that, though the small size of these watches has been out of style for quite a while. As Americans get larger and wrists get fatter, it is harder to wear these small 40's watches that today would be considered boy's size or even women's size.

These are great watches both stylistically and historically. However, I would caution against wearing this every day. The mechanism, though outstandingly robust for the time, is hardly so by modern standards and parts are difficult to source. I don't know of a watchmaker in San Diego but if you break this watch, you could be in for a very long wait and a very expensive repair.
 

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As Americans get larger and wrists get fatter, it is harder to wear these small 40's watches that today would be considered boy's size or even women's size.
I would submit that watch styles have changed over the years, yes larger watches are more popular now, but it's not due to Americans getting fatter. Look at the Asian markets -- huge watches are enormously popular in Asia, where the men are small and have tiny wrists compared to us "fat Americans." I think it's just styles changing.

To a great extent, the recent "large watch" fad was fueled by Panerai. Those watches started their climb in popularity around 1998 or so. Sylvester Stallone started wearing them . . . then Arnold . . . and they took off from there. Rolex has only VERY recently started going larger, and then not nearly as large as Panerai and others. (The new Seadweller Deep Sea being their largest!)
 

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Panerai watches are huge and they have definitely set the trend for increasing size of men's watches. Many Swiss watch manufacturers have reluctantly followed the trend and introduced larger watches. I don't know how much longer this trend will continue and some watch collectors believe this trend is due for a reversal in the near future.
 
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