Men's Clothing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,

Below is the copied text of a now-locked thread about DC tailors from February 2004. There are some rather detailed opinions stated, especially by a "jimDC." Is there anything new anyone has to add? I've heard nothing but praises here for Field's lately; however I wonder if anyone (including anyone who didn't participate in the post from last year) has had experience with other tailors - whether those listed or others. Thanks




Posted - 02/06/2004 : 16:04:20
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've heard favorable things about Georges de Paris -- who supposedly has made a number of suits for George W. Bush, prior presidents as well as members of Congress, though apparently has most of his business in lobbyists/lawyers. He told me slacks start at about $800 and suits at about $2,200 for fairly "ordinary" fabric -- 100s, I assume; $3,000 for really top fabric. I've also heard favorable comments about Geoffrey Lewis. I've visited both "stores," but not had work done by either -- just snooping around...

Anyone have any experience with them or others? What about bespoke shirts and shoes in DC? Are there any makers?


marc39


USA
767 Posts
Posted - 02/06/2004 : 16:58:58
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The indefatigable Darren Beaman, a fine London tailor, should be headed your way some time soon during his US excursion. Highly recommended.

marc grayson



RJman



870 Posts
Posted - 02/06/2004 : 17:04:54
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Linea Pitti on Wisconsin (near the Mazza Gallerie) has done stellar alterations for me including on some RJ. They also purport to make some shirts or suits, though it may be MTM. Their claim to infame was in some drug dealer's money laundering case in the 1980s, though. Highcliffe Clothiers also offers some form of bespoke/MTM although I have not tried them. Frankly I've never had a very impressed opinion of how George W. Bush looks (sartorially; I confine my comments and let's keep this apolitical), so I don't think I'd go to Georges de Paris. Anyway with most of the major Savile Row boys (including Darren, as well as John Lester of Harvie and Hudson according to a postcard I got yesterday) coming to town fairly regularly, the only reason to go local would be for time reasons. Otherwise I think Savile Row is price-competitive to what you find in most cities, and especially with the MTM services available at Saks et al to have Brioni or Cifonelli or what have you made to measure for a large sum.
RJman, newly RJ'd.


regularjoe



50 Posts
Posted - 02/06/2004 : 18:03:35
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

kabert, do you live in DC?

I don't have any firsthand experience, but I think we might be in the same stages of doing research on getting a custom suit made.

Here are the options I'm looking at, but haven't contacted directly yet so I'm not sure who can do what:

Highcliffe - I read a blurb in the Post about them. They got a pretty good review; they can do shirts and ties as well. Don't know if they farm out their work or have a guy in house.

Eric Michaels - two young guys started up a custom clothiers. They have a location on Connecticut north of Dupont but their website says they'll send someone to you (not sure if it's a tailor or sales rep).

Christopher Kim on 21st and M - supposedly, they have a tailor in house who can do custom shirts and suits.

There's also the Custom Shop on Connecticut about a block from the Mayflower/Thomas Pink store. I know they do shirts, but not sure about the rest.

But based on some recommendations, I might give Darren a try when he comes here in March. Sorry I couldn't have better info, but I was actually going to do the legwork to talk to the above guys this weekend or next.



manton



650 Posts
Posted - 02/06/2004 : 21:40:22
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William Field, on Wisconsin Avenue in Georgetown, made me some great odd jackets and trousers 10 years ago. The business is still operating, but it has been taken over by his son. I don't know if it is any good any more.


gazpacho



6 Posts
Posted - 02/07/2004 : 10:02:33
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are a couple of shops on Wisconsin Ave just north of Georgetown - Baytok, who is bespoke and nothing else, and then closeby Everard's clothing, who claims that he'll make shirts for you. Has some nice ties on display.


gazpacho



6 Posts
Posted - 02/07/2004 : 10:04:15
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are a couple of shops on Wisconsin Ave just north of Georgetown - Baytok, who is bespoke and nothing else, and then closeby Everard's clothing, who claims that he'll make shirts for you. Has some nice ties on display.


Darren


United Kingdom
427 Posts
Posted - 02/07/2004 : 17:24:31
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

hi i will be in Washington in march , would be happy to meet up

Washington

March 12th 14th 2004

WILLARD I-C WASHINGTON
InterContinental Hotels
1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20004
UNITED STATES
Tel: 001-202-6289100


Darren




jimDC



13 Posts
Posted - 02/07/2004 : 23:40:30
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gentlemen:

Greetings and Salutations!

This is my first post on the Forum; although I've been an avid observer for the past couple of months (a guilty pleasure). Normally I would have been content just being a fly on the wall. As a former customer of a couple of the tailors mentioned (and one or two DC tailors that have not been mentioned), however, I am compelled to add my two cents.

Geoffrey Lewis:

A few years ago, while still a novice to the world of tailored clothing, I purchased two suits and three pairs of pants from G.L. The proprietor is a gentleman who calls himself "Angelo," which would lead one to believe that he is Italian. Upon further inquiry, "Angelo" confessed he is from Iran. Now "Angelo" must not be judged poorly because he is Iranian - I'm sure there are fine tailors and exceptional gentlemen from Iran. Nevertheless, in hindsight, I should have been suspicious of an Iranian who holds himself out as an Italian operating a tailor's shop with an English name. This was just one of the deceptions that I didn’t pick up on until it was too late. My judgment must have been clouded by the price - the three pairs of pants were $100.00 each; the suits were $800.00 each. When I inquired about his work “Angelo†told me everything I wanted to hear: the suits were hand-basted and fully canvassed; he performed all the work himself on the premises, etc., etc. Well all of that was a bunch of lies. The jackets were made using a glued on floating canvass, i.e., not sewn in, but rather glued on the lapel and at the bottom to make it look like a real tailored garment. Also, I learned that the suits were not made on sight when I arrived for my one and only fitting when I saw “Angelo†fetching them from the factory packaging. Real smooth! The fit was awful; the fabric cheap; the buttons plastic; the pants flared – nearly bell-bottomed; the fake stitching along the edges, which I had to pay extra for, was horrendous – the edges have since rolled terribly; imitation button holes laughable. Bottom line – there’s a sucker born every minute, and I was one of them. That’s how “Angelo†makes his money.

Christopher Kim:

I went to Mr. Kim recently to rent a tux. He promised he would put me in a tux that fit better then the jacket I was wearing when I walked in. Mind you, I was wearing a blazer that was made for me by William Field (more on him and the blazer later) which fits me almost perfectly, so I was immediately skeptical. He told me that my blazer was too short and otherwise didn’t fit right. Needless to say he was wrong about the blazer and his tux, which not only didn’t fit better than my blazer, it didn’t fit at all. Also, Mr. Kim showed me his work room where three unhappy-looking Asian gentlemen were toiling away on suits. He showed me a few suits he was making, and needless to say they didn’t look very good. Anyway, Darren (yes I’m one of his devotees too) has just cut my new dinner suit, which should be ready for New Years.

Baytok:

Irfan Baytok is probably the only tailor in Washington that offers a fully bespoke service. He is also the worst of the bunch. Baytok prides himself on once being the head tailor at Raleigh’s before it went under. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Raleigh’s, it was a local store, about the equivalent of Men’s Warehouse. So, taking Baytok at his word, he still does not have the best pedigree. Apparently, according to Georges de Paris (btw, if you talk to these guys you will learn that most of the local tailors, with the exception of Field, will talk badly about the others when given the chance), since hanging out his shingle, Baytok has gone through all sorts of bankruptcies and restructurings to stay in business. Also, to further expound on his character, Baytok, whose shop is just a couple of doors down from Field’s, will go outside and try to divert Field’s customers into his own shop. Also, once in his shop, Baytok’s favorite think to do is talk badly about Field and slander the quality of his work. None of this, of course, is any concern of mine. My gripe with Baytok is with the quality of his work. I brought to him the makings of a suit that was cut for me by a tailor in Bologna, Italy. I was supposed to return to Italy, at which time I would be available for fittings. My plans to return to Italy were cancelled, however, so I paid the tailor for the work he had completed (and then some) and had him ship the suit to me unfinished. The suit was already cut, padded, canvassed, and loosely basted for a first fitting. The fit was quite good, the balance perfect. Baytok agreed to finish the suit, which would have required him, really, just to sew it up. Instead, he decided to s**** around with the fit and the balance, and three or four fittings and a couple of thousand dollars later I walked out with his finished product, which he claimed, neigh insisted was perfect. Well it was awful. The fit of the jacket was terrible. The buttons were cheap, the trousers fit poorly. I brought the suit a couple of doors down to William Field who kindly looked at it and told me what was wrong with the fit and how to fix it. I brought it back to Baytok who agreed to make the corrections only upon my insistence. He really didn’t want to do it, but there were other customers in the shop at the time and I was pretty adamant. Anyway, he tried to fix it over the course of about a month, but didn’t really have the skills to fix it properly. I got rather tired of dealing with him so finally I just took the suit home where it hung in my closet for the longest time, along side the two suits from Geoffrey Lewis. I then wore it to a fitting with Darren. He looked at it, took out a needle and thread, made one simple spot adjustment, and now it fits nearly a hundred percent better then it did when I left Baytok’s shop for the last time. The trousers, btw, were, as Darren pointed out, no different from ready made.

Field’s English Custom Tailor’s

William Field is solicitous old gentleman who was a sewer in Savile Row back in the fifties before immigrating to America. His son also works with him, and is, I think, slowly taking over the business. William, Jr. is a great guy whose enthusiasm for tailoring is readily apparent. This summer the Fields made me a beautiful navy blazer with patch pockets and gorgeous Holland and Sherry brass buttons. The fit, as mentioned above, is nearly perfect. Nonetheless, while I believe the Fields are exceptionally qualified sewers, I’m not convinced they do their own cutting, as they insisted they did. First, there are no customer patterns anywhere to be seen in the shop; and second, there is no table upon which they could mark and cut a suit. So, while I think they produce a good MTM product, I don’t believe they really provide a full bespoke service. I wish someone would prove me wrong, because I really like them.

Highcliffe Custom Clothiers

Highcliffe is a custom store that takes measurements and sends them to a factory to produce “custom styled†clothing. I’ve never purchased anything from there, but from what I’ve seen, the quality is about the same as Geoffrey Lewis. The proprietor is a gentleman by the name of Mark Metzger. I don’t know why he, like “Angelo,†a/k/a Geoffrey Lewis, insists on trying fool people with the British named store. What is wrong with Metzger’s Custom Clothiers?

Georges de Paris

I’ve never been a customer of Georges, but I have visited his shop, seen his work, and talked with him at length. He is quite an interesting character, and as someone has already pointed out, is the preferred tailor of recent presidents, members of Congress, and many lawyers and lobbyists in town. Personally, I don’t like the cut of his suits, and I don’t think they have much of the hand finishing you will see on finer handmade suits. I will credit Georges for one thing – he didn’t care much for Clinton as a customer.

Custom Shop

This is a chain, and I suspect they farm their work out to a sweatshop in Asia. Of course I have no real data to support this suspicion.

Eric Michaels

Never heard of him/them. Can’t comment.


Finally, I hate to add another voice to the “Darren Love-Fest†that this forum has become, but I think anyone in Washington would be far better served by using Darren’s service. The end product is far superior to anything you’ll see locally – true artwork in fact; his price is competitive; and once you’re in his sartorial care, he also becomes a good friend. He is a true gentleman and artisan, who has earned completely this skeptic’s trust. What more can I say…

Sorry for the length. Hope this helps.

Cheers.






regularjoe



50 Posts
Posted - 02/09/2004 : 17:41:43
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

jimDC, thank you very much for the insight. I will give Field's a shot, but based on your (on others) recommendation, will definitely try to get in touch with Darren when he makes his way to DC.

I did some checking in the Custom Shop and they are indeed a chain that focus on shirts. The prices are high ($100-$200) for mostly so-so fabrics (80s and 100s cotton, with a few weird notables like cashmere blended fabrics). They say they do all their work up in New Jersey. I can safely cross them off my list.



kabert


USA
243 Posts
Posted - 02/10/2004 : 16:50:10
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jim,

Wow. Thanks very much for the info! By the way, I understand you had a negative experience at Geoffrey Lewis; however, I've since had them fix up a few pairs of pants for me (cuffs; seat adjustments). Easy stuff. They did a fine job on those. But I also got a chance to finger through their dozens of fabric books and I must say, perhaps they outsource the making of their suits, etc., but they certainly have some spectacularly beautiful fabrics from which to choose! I also chatted some with Georges de Paris. Jeez, this guy's a talker! Sounds like he makes suits/slacks there in his shop but sends out his shirts. I'll check out the others you mentioned. Thanks again.



kabert


USA
243 Posts
Posted - 02/10/2004 : 16:56:38
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jim,

Wow. Thanks very much for the info! By the way, I understand you had a negative experience at Geoffrey Lewis; however, I've since had them fix up a few pairs of pants for me (cuffs; seat adjustments). Easy stuff. They did a fine job on those. But I also got a chance to finger through their dozens of fabric books and I must say, perhaps they outsource the making of their suits, etc., but they certainly have some spectacularly beautiful fabrics from which to choose! I also chatted some with Georges de Paris. Jeez, this guy's a talker! Sounds like he makes suits/slacks there in his shop but sends out his shirts. I'll check out the others you mentioned. Thanks again.



Topic
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top