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Interesting article, but I pretty much totally disagree with its premise. The suit has not lost its appeal as a symbol of power. Jay Z and Justin Timberlake are wearing custom Tom Fords precisely to demonstrate their power, status and financial positions. Doesn't that just reinforce the power suit? I can't see how it doesn't. I guess what has changed is the tie is now somewhat optional. Maybe it should be the death of the power tie.
 

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I like this quote.

"I like a pocket square, but I generally don't wear one with a tie," says Heye, a former Republican strategist, now a CNN contributor. "If I'm wearing a tie, three out of four times it's blue. I like blue and I've been told it works for me. . . . If I'm wearing a jacket and no tie, I always like a pocket square. I think it's a little bit more dressy. It shows a little bit of effort."
This is 100% my attitude on it, and how I wear it.
 

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I thought it was a good article. The way I read it, she was being quite specific in referring to the death of the 'power suit' while acknowledging towards the end that there is a renaissance of sorts going on with suits from a general style point of view.

What's a 'power suit'? I think I would have some of the same associations she evidently does. In my mind it makes me think of shiny, boxy suits on greasy people in 80s movies.

I just checked Wikipedia and indeed it defines the power suit as "A type of office suit stereotypically associated with the 1980s. It is characterized by sharp cuts, wide shoulder pads and a stiff rigidity"

I listened to a Joe Rogan podcast where he interviewed Guy Ritchie a while ago. Now, Guy Richie is a pretty bad director, but he has a taste for the finer things in life, including suiting. He tried to explain to Rogan why he liked wearing a bespoke suit. Rogan embodied all the arguments you hear from some people... Suits are uncomfortable... Suits are pretentious. Richie said no, badly fitting cheap suits are uncomfortable, well made suits are just the opposite. And as for suits being pretentious: It's just as the author of the article mentioned, it's more the case that we have a generation of young people who actually feel insecure about wearing a suit. Richie argues so many young men today have missed out on their heritage, they actually don't feel comfortable dressing like an adult when it's appropriate. Instead, it's permanent extended kidulthood.
 

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I got the impression that the "power suit" the article was referring to was a suit worn in a business context to demonstrate a position a power, not a specific style of suit that originally defined the "power suit". The article is right that the suit is no longer used in the same way to demonstrate a position of power in the workplace, but the suit is now more often being worn in a fashionable setting. But through the examples of the celebrtities who wear Tom Ford suits, they are wearing those suits to look powerful. The look Tom Ford is known for is certainly the look of a traditional "power suit", with strong shoulders and a stiff, sharp cut. It's done differently than it was in the 1980s, but the effect is still the same.
 

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And as for suits being pretentious: It's just as the author of the article mentioned, it's more the case that we have a generation of young people who actually feel insecure about wearing a suit. Richie argues so many young men today have missed out on their heritage, they actually don't feel comfortable dressing like an adult when it's appropriate. Instead, it's permanent extended kidulthood.
As I'm just coming up on middle-age, I find myself enjoying dressing like a "man". I'm not a 20 something, take pride in not dressing as one and not being treated as one.
 

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I got the impression that the "power suit" the article was referring to was a suit worn in a business context to demonstrate a position a power, not a specific style of suit that originally defined the "power suit". The article is right that the suit is no longer used in the same way to demonstrate a position of power in the workplace, but the suit is now more often being worn in a fashionable setting. But through the examples of the celebrtities who wear Tom Ford suits, they are wearing those suits to look powerful. The look Tom Ford is known for is certainly the look of a traditional "power suit", with strong shoulders and a stiff, sharp cut. It's done differently than it was in the 1980s, but the effect is still the same.
I think it's a fine example of how an utterly undefined term, in this case "power suit", can be interpreted by just about anyone to mean almost anything.
 

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I got the impression that the "power suit" the article was referring to was a suit worn in a business context to demonstrate a position a power, not a specific style of suit that originally defined the "power suit". The article is right that the suit is no longer used in the same way to demonstrate a position of power in the workplace, but the suit is now more often being worn in a fashionable setting. But through the examples of the celebrtities who wear Tom Ford suits, they are wearing those suits to look powerful. The look Tom Ford is known for is certainly the look of a traditional "power suit", with strong shoulders and a stiff, sharp cut. It's done differently than it was in the 1980s, but the effect is still the same.
I wore a TF suit yesterday (charcoal plaid, O'Conner Y fit, peaked lapels). Retro 80s candy stripe shirt and loads of compliments. It is definitely a modern iteration of a power suit.
 

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What I got from it is that the suit isn't what it was once in a business context -- a symbol of power and authority -- but has become something stylish that men wear outside the boardroom.

The article states: "Suits have emerged as a form of vanity, in the peacock tradition, breaking free of the Master of the Universe mold. What they have lost in power, they have gained in style."

I agree with that aspect of the article. In fact, while I wear suits for official capacities regularly, I don't wear a suit to work daily. I actually wear suits most often for social reasons, to stand out from the crowd.

That point of the article is good. I just didn't like how the author stated that suits can be worn in creative ways, with hiking boots, sneakers and so on. I'm sure most readers of this forum would agree that a suit looks best when worn with the proper shoes and accessories. Still, not a bad article overall.
 

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^^Ahhh...:icon_scratch::icon_scratch:
Harry Stiles is obviously sartorially more adventurous than most of us could hope to ever be! Fun to watch, but I think I will stick with the basics and leave the flash bang to the entertainers. ;)
 
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