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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While packing for vacation, I was almost stumped by this question.

"What does one wear to hike up the caldera of an active volcano at 10,000 feet, and in sub freezing temperatures?"

The answer is a Timberland Gortex and Thinsulate lined beater chukka boot.

Brown Footwear Shoe Wood Liver


The only problem is that I have to wear them on the plane for 11 1/2 hours as they are too heavy to pack.:eek:
 

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Moderator and Bon Vivant
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Those don't look like anything I'd wear to climb mountains in. Admittedly my preference for mountain boots are more gnarly than those but still . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It’s not mountain climbing, but trails to the top. Dirt, ash, loose rocks, ice, nothing treacherous. Unless Ol’ Mauna Kea decides to let loose. The gas will kill me before the lava.

Just need something with some grip that I don’t mind getting beat up. Can’t use a double JR sole, cordovan high boot now, can I ? This is as close as I get to rugged. I’m from NYC, not Portland.
 

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If there were enough time remaining to break in a new pair of hiking boots, as one confirmed shoe whore to another, I would be arguing for you to consider the next purchase to add to that magnificent collection of yours! LOL. ;)

In any event, take care and may you have a safe and enjoyable vacation.
 

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Sub freezing hike? I know you already have your footwear sorted, but for others who might be in need, I bought the Columbia Waterproof Omni Grip/Omni heat winter hiking boot for my recent trip to Austria. I wore them on the plane and then took them off and slipped into my leather slippers for the flight. Slippers on a plane was a landmark discovery in personal comfort I made a few years ago. Still rather dapper and beats stockinged feet in the loo.

And the Columbia boots, remarkable. They required no break in period, and my feet never overheated.

Cheers,

BSR
 

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Danner Light Hikers would be another candidate worth considering. Wearing them on the plane and walking around a couple of airports just might be all the break-in they would need? :icon_scratch:
 

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I've done field work on active lava fields in the past, so I have some small expertise in this.

Crucial elements are ankle coverage (so a hiking boot); stitched, not glued, soles (glue can melt and the soles fall off - I've seen it happen!); *no* metal shank (you don't want a grill inside your shoe), and tough enough uppers to resist the sometimes knife-sharp terrain. Also make sure it's not a rubber or leather sole, but that's less an issue with modern boots.

Then admit that these shoes aren't long for this world (well, depending on how much time you spend on lava fields), and find the cheapest boot which satisfies those criteria.

On those Timberlands I see stitching, but I'd want to verify that the sole is actually stitched to the boot (and not some kind of "faux" stitching - I think of Timberlands as fashion boots, so I'm suspicious, but in any case I'd verify it even with Asolos or the like.)

The stitching is a big one; that's the common geologist's horror story, "the melted boot".

DH
 
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