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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wore a Panama at weekends for most of last summer, the first time I've worn a hat on a regular basis, and became fairly comfortable in it. Last weekend I returned to Bates to pick up a winter hat, in advance of this week's miserable (even for a Canadian!) weather in London.

But I'm not entirely sure what I think of it. For starters, I'm not even sure what to call it. Bates sells it as the "Mayfair"; it's a black felt hat with a ribbon and medium brim, creased along the top and pinched slightly at the sides. I think that makes it a trilby. But the side brims curve up, in a way I associate with a bowler rather than a soft hat, and there is a stitched ribbon on the edge. Initially all this attracted me to the hat, but now I'm not so sure.

What do I call such a hat? For what is it appropriate?
 

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I can't find the "Mayfair" on their web site. Post a picture if you can
 

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You are correct, the homburg IS stiff. And the brim definitely doesn't move.



Sounds like you are referring to a trilby, albeit a more "classic" style. The turned brim was more popular pre-1960's, but DID exist. Like this classic example. I love hats like this as they allow you to see the evolution of style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's very interesting -- my hat certainly doesn't resemble the one you've posted, but it may have some underlying similarity. I don't have a photo to hand, but will try to post one later.
 

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Two keys for hats

I own them, I wear them regularly, and I do so for function as much as fashion.

You absolutely must get hats that flatter your head and face shape.

Once you have the right hat, you must wear it with confidence. If you can look people in the eye while wearing it, then all thoughts of it being a costume will cease.
 

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You are correct, the homburg IS stiff. And the brim definitely doesn't move.

Sounds like you are referring to a trilby, albeit a more "classic" style. The turned brim was more popular pre-1960's, but DID exist. Like this classic example. I love hats like this as they allow you to see the evolution of style.
Homburgs are not necessarily stiff. I have seen a number of classic ones that were soft.

It does not look like that brim is meant to go down in the front like a fedora.

Cordovan
 
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