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What's the big deal with unlined sports jackets? They seem to be quite the commodity, but I don't understand what makes them any better than a fully lined or partially lined jacket. Can someone lead me out of ignorance?
 

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In my experience, unlined jackets are often linen or cotton. I'm no tailor, but I believe that the intent is to make a lightweight, breathable garment that is good for warm weather conditions. They typically are pretty unstructured, soft shoulders, etc.
 

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I agree with all of the above. Usually for the heat, linen or cotton and they are less formal. I have one or two and they are linen. If possible, get a quarter lined jacket. It is just as light yet better for more occasions and a little dressier.
 

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In my experience, unlined jackets are often linen or cotton. I'm no tailor, but I believe that the intent is to make a lightweight, breathable garment that is good for warm weather conditions. They typically are pretty unstructured, soft shoulders, etc.
+1, although I a wool sports coat would benefit more from this feature. If one were to wear a wool coat in the spring/summer, then it would be beneficial to have an unlined sports coat/suit.
 

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In my experience, unlined jackets are often linen or cotton. I'm no tailor, but I believe that the intent is to make a lightweight, breathable garment that is good for warm weather conditions. They typically are pretty unstructured, soft shoulders, etc.
I can't say what's typical, but my favorite sportcoat is an unlined Zegna that is 50% wool, 30% camelhair, and 20% silk.

The shoulders are roped like no other, which I absolutely love.

It barely fits anymore and might soon be for sale, but I will part with a stupid sum of money and push my tailor to the brink before I part with it.
 

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all other things being equal, there is more labor involved in making a 1/2 lined jacket than a full lined. even more in a 1/4 lined. and still more in a skeleton lined. the full lining covers everything on the inside. the partial linings require more finishing on the inside.
 

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Most vintage jackets were skeleton lined for 3 reasons:

1. Higher quality. As was said above, it takes more and better work with a skeleton or 1/2 lining than a full lining.

2. Less lining allows the jacket to drape better. But many modern jackets are fully lined because they are made of lower quality light-weight material that doesn't drape well anyways.

3. Cooler in warm weather.
 

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In my experience, unlined jackets are often linen or cotton. I'm no tailor, but I believe that the intent is to make a lightweight, breathable garment that is good for warm weather conditions. They typically are pretty unstructured, soft shoulders, etc.
Quite right. The idea is to make a lighter weight jacket. They are rather difficult to make especially if the jacket is structured. With a buggy or half lined jacket the cut has to be spot on. I have yet to meet either an English or American that can make a jacket like this well. For my clients I recommend a MTM option which is laser cut and has very precise methods of construction. For my own suits I always go bespoke but for a summer suit or jacket in lighter weight or one that is buggy lined MTM is the way to go. In my opinion.
 

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In my experience, unlined jackets are often linen or cotton. I'm no tailor, but I believe that the intent is to make a lightweight, breathable garment that is good for warm weather conditions. They typically are pretty unstructured, soft shoulders, etc.
I've got two wool jackets, one a light weight open weave from Samuelsohn, and one a Harris Tweed (IIRC Corbin, but the jacket is 5000 miles from here--there are no dry cleaners on the base here, so I only brought one tailored jacket) that are 1/2 or less lined.

The Samuelsohn is "1/4" lined, meaning that it has just a touch of lining at the upper shoulder and the full sleeves. This makes it a VERY cool jacket for summer indoor wear. This particular jacket is very casual (patch pockets and a noticeable texture to the fabric).

The Tweed jacket his "half" lined, with basically the lining in the back removed. It's kind of odd in a jacket this weight--generally one would only wear a tweed when it was cool(er) out, but for outdoor activities where temperatures may fluctuate a bit it does seem to rather comfortable.

With a rough cloth like tweed I wouldn't want any less lining--you would wind up wearing out your shirts faster than normal, I'd expect.
 

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I can't say what's typical, but my favorite sportcoat is an unlined Zegna that is 50% wool, 30% camelhair, and 20% silk.

The shoulders are roped like no other, which I absolutely love.

It barely fits anymore and might soon be for sale, but I will part with a stupid sum of money and push my tailor to the brink before I part with it.
I'm being a real pr!ck here, but why not just take steps to make sure you don't get much bigger? I mean, unless you're a professional body builder or such.
 
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