Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We should all post photos of the buildings we find most tradly. I have very many but here are a few:
The Knickerbocker, NY, NY

The New York Yacht Club, NY, NY

Grand Central Station, NY, NY

Chelsea, Muttontown, NY

And of course numerous others.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
""Trad" describes a style of clothes. That's it."

I thought it was borrowed from the Jazz world.

https://www.tradandnow.com/

From wiki:

Trad is generally an abbreviation of the word "Traditional". Its meaning varies with context, but the following have been observed:

If your point is that it has become a technical term used in a rather narrow range by the members of this blog to refer only to clothes, I would agree with you. Accept that this thread suggests that it is not used in this narrow range by members of this blog.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
""Trad" describes a style of clothes. That's it."

If your point is that it has become a technical term used in a rather narrow range by the members of this blog to refer only to clothes, I would agree with you. Accept that this thread suggests that it is not used in this narrow range by members of this blog.
Maybe I am a heretic.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Perhaps Thread Change to 'Buildings with a high % of Traditionally Dressed'

Started my career in public service at the US Treasury Department under Secretary Baker and it would certainly meet the new thread title with a very high percentage of traditionally dressed executives and staff. That was over 20 years ago, but a lot of institutional history and cultural reinforcement so hopefully it has not deviated much in terms of dress.

Andy M.
 

· Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
""Trad" describes a style of clothes. That's it."

I thought it was borrowed from the Jazz world.

https://www.tradandnow.com/

From wiki:

Trad is generally an abbreviation of the word "Traditional". Its meaning varies with context, but the following have been observed:

If your point is that it has become a technical term used in a rather narrow range by the members of this blog to refer only to clothes, I would agree with you. Accept that this thread suggests that it is not used in this narrow range by members of this blog.
However, should you read the mission statement on the forum masthead (on the forum index page), it offers a much more restrictive definition that which you referrence. It starts out,"Hello! I am Harris..."

Great "classic" building pics, BTW! :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
Nolan,

"Who Makes the Tradliest Deodorant"

If you go to the Curriculum, the more exclusive version of this forum--in a section specifically dedicated to "classic American dress"--you will find a section on "personal care products". It is one of the longest discussions on the Curriculum. They seem to think deodorant, razors, and even tooth paste fall under "classic American dress".
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
I've read that many times. It reads, for more context, as follows:

"Hello to all. I'm Harris--not to be confused with "A Harris," whom I believe has been a forum member for some time."

"I live in the Northeastern U.S. and tend toward the American Look. Or trad or whatever you wish to call it. Sack suits, tassel loafers, shetland crewnecks, Harris Tweeds, madras, etc."

"I am interested in knowing how many forum members have stuck with this look--the J. Press-Brooks-Andover Shop crowd."

"Harris"

If we take Harris literally, the answer to his question is one word, a number. My guess is that no more than a handful "stuck with this look", which, in its wording, suggests that he means "stuck with it since it was in vogue in the 50s and 60s". Furthermore, he doesn't really insist on any particular term to describe the look: "...whatever you may wish to call it".

I myself prefer the term TNSIL, and prefer clothes of that sort (though not the tassels). In fact, I'm reasonably confident that Harris meant TNSIL when he wrote that. If we stuck with that designation, it would be a term that (1) is only applicable to clothes (since it would be a stretch to talk about TNSIL buildings), and (2) is not already in the American lexicon as referring to other things. Many of us first encountered "trad" as a term in music.

Maybe to avoid this type of interaction in the future, we should start posts with, "What sort of building looks best with Trad clothing?"; "What cars match TNSIL?"; "what deoderants, holidays, etc. suit the trad personality?"

Scratch that last one; it extended trad from the clothes to the person.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Maybe to avoid this type of interaction in the future, we should start posts with, "What sort of building looks best with Trad clothing?"; "What cars match TNSIL?"; "what deoderants, holidays, etc. suit the trad personality?"
Or, option B, we could just realize that the distinction between "What are tradly buildings?" and "What sort of building looks best with Trad clothing?" is not really of earth-shattering importance, and just enjoy or not enjoy the particular thread.

Lighten up!
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top