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Good OP. I came here after searching for some time for a distinctly American take on non-fashion. By that I mean (1) clothes with American heritage if not roots, (2) made in the US, and (3) not subject to the vagaries and trends that define fashion. Trad works for me according to these criteria. My purposes include supporting the US economy, defining myself on foreign shores--during a time of war and rampant anti-American sentiment--as an American (but hopefully avoiding the "ugly American" thing), simplicity of combining elements (I don't choose my clothes in the dark, but I could without fear that they won't match) and not worrying about what is in and out of style.

My biggest worry when it comes to Trad is that now that "preppy is in" there will be a time when people look at what I'm wearing and say "That is so 2008".

I am for the reasons cited self-aware about my clothing, but not to the point (I hope) of excessive self-consciousness once I'm out the door.

Oh yeah, and my feet feel better since I started wearing quality American shoes.
 

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I don't get this idea that Made in the USA is a requirement of it being trad? American roots?

I disagree. How about fine sweaters made in Ireland, tweeds from the UK and oilskins from Australia? None of them are American-made or have US roots, yet I suspect people here would say those are quite trad. So...is it really about being "made in the USA?"
I'll reply to this since it seems like my words may have sparked the interchange. I wrote "clothes with American heritage if not roots" to concede that a lot of things I'm happy with are not necessarily American made, like a Harris Tweed, which has become part of American heritage. I live in Australia, where people drink tea as part of their British heritage, even though the tea comes from Ceylon and other places. When I was growing up in the US, kids at school of a certain colour would tell me, "you're so white". I never knew how to respond. I suppose something was indicating a European background. Now I wear my tweed jacket and Barbour coat and somehow people still recognise me as an American.

The reason I chose my wording, and why I choose my clothing, is that living in another country I have become increasingly aware of my identity as an American and am happy to express it in what I wear (and as I wrote earlier, esp during a time of war and strong anti-American sentiment). I could imagine that others wish to celebrate their respect for their IVY League heritage, or "traditional values" in a world losing its moorings, or something similar. That's up to them. I've stated my reason.

Since the issue was raised, I suppose I would add that I'd like to support the few American firms that remain. I don't care if an Asian or an Arab person makes my clothes, as long as they are treated right by their employer and spend the money in a way that helps the US economy. For that to happen, it seems to me they need to be "ma[king] in the USA". I'm keen to see the Anderson Little blazer, because no matter who actually puts them together, I think it reflects some of these values.
 
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