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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a question for all of the tailors on this forum, and I think that is is something that many of the members here would like insight into. Where did you learn to make tailored menswear, did you go to school, if so where, or did you open up books and sit at a sewing machine, if so which books were helpful to you.
 

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Sam Disano in Sydney says that in his day there was a technical college course teaching cutting and tailoring. In recent years interest has waned and they have dropped the course.

The text they used to study from was A.A. Whife. See this thread for more details if interested in learning about cutting and tailoring:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the link. That is where part of my curiosity came in was the fact that all the colleges and trade schools only teach draping and women's wear it seams. Plus I can drape and draft women's but would prefer not to have to pay sample makers to draft for mens for me.
 

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https://www.tailorandcutter.co.uk/courses.htm

I suppose these are the latest cuting methods. There is another class there for fittings.

There are lots of old books and journals. Some methods aren't bad, but are a bit dated. I think the scientific methods started around 1700, maybe a little sooner (I wouldn't doubt that some where doing it several hundred years earlier). One of the methods before that for armholes was to sew the garment up (baste fitting) and make a few marks at the armhole and then use a horse shoe to draw around. The old methods of measureing didn't have inches and feet and yards but, about half yard, and your thumb -which is about an inch wide-, and another measurement. Some of the old patterns, like 1850s are interesting. By the time you get to 1940s-50s the methods were sort of goofy, but worked. The methods in the cutting class above is so much better and easier to use than those of the past it is a good starting place. Of course making patterns is not enough- fitting is equally important. Fitting is a life time achievement.
 

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The scientific approach to cutting really started in the early 1800s. Before then tailors would often disparage the taking of measurements. There used to be this thing called the system of thirds which I've never figured out.

I haven't cut and made up garments off different systems but I find some modern systems to be too dumbed down for my liking. I have been learning to draft patterns and I am very impressed by some 19th century systems eg Devere - though his system is meant for body coats.
 
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