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I posted something by David Coggins on my site about the rules of black tie. Thought you all would appreciate it. A few tidbits below:

A tuxedo is the pinnacle of formality, it exemplifies class and style. It hasn't been improved upon over time because it cannot be improved upon. That's to say: regardless of your everyday sartorial prerogatives you should own one and own it proudly. If that idea scandalizes you, then consider withdrawing from civilization.

A man shouldn't look forced into a tuxedo any more than he should look forced to drink champagne. Unless you're attending your mother's third wedding you should not carry an air of dutiful malaise. On the contrary, it's an opportunity to wear a timeless suit that serves you well.

Some guidelines:

-A tuxedo need not be expensive, just properly tailored. That's true for any suit but more important with a tuxedo because the contrasts are so stark and the elements to simple. Slightly narrow shoulders are smart; the unwieldy overlarge coat that resembles a hand-me-down is not.

-Simplicity reigns. Don't reinvent anything or tempt fate with novelty. Aspirational cleverness--the bold bow tie, the thematic suspenders--reek intolerably. (Incidentally, your clothes should never reflect your hobbies--golfers, you know who you are.) If you're Scottish then wear trousers made of the family's tartan. Since you're not, don't.

More here: https://acontinuouslean.com/2009/01/19/unsolicited-thoughts-black-tie/
 

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I find I disagree with nearly every single point there. From calling it a "tuxedo" to saying it is the pinnacle of formality(the author has never heard of white tie then?) to saying that only Scots should wear tartan breeks to saying that an individual shouldn't personalize it. What a load of nonsense and contrary to everything else I've ever read or heard or
learned or practiced regarding black tie!
 

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Just read the post. Pretty basic stuff on black tie attire...
What about accessories such as shawls, cufflinks & studs, vests vs. cummerbunds, the right footwear, etc. Like I said, pretty basic and not too impressed...

IMO, this is THE BEST resource on black tie attire:
www.blacktieguide.com

This site covers anything from traditional black tie, to white tie, to warm weather black tie.

I also wrote some basic stuff on accessories for black tie dress code:
https://www.squidoo.com/black-tie-attire

Have a good day,

HP
 

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IT IS NOT A WING TIP COLLAR!! These are wingtips:

For that matter,it is turndown or laydown collar.There exists no such thing as a flip over collar.

I have not the energy to correct all of the other mistakes you have made.

Just read the post. Pretty basic stuff on black tie attire...
What about accessories such as shawls, cufflinks & studs, vests vs. cummerbunds, the right footwear, etc. Like I said, pretty basic and not too impressed...

IMO, this is THE BEST resource on black tie attire:
www.blacktieguide.com

This site covers anything from traditional black tie, to white tie, to warm weather black tie.

I also wrote some basic stuff on accessories for black tie dress code:
https://www.squidoo.com/black-tie-attire

Have a good day,

HP
 

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Giving you the benefit of the doubt, I'll assume you included the photo of Churchill in semi-formal day wear (Stroller in the US) to reference the text on tying bow ties as opposed to the "borrowed" text form Coggins regarding black tie, which is semi-formal evening wear.

Morning dress - formal day wear
Stroller - semi-formal day wear
Black tie - semi-formal evening wear
White tie - formal evening wear.

There is another variant, which is formal evening wear (stand up collar, tails and double side silk on trousers) however with a black tie and black waistcoat. (White tie in black in other words)

This is worn at, for example, Masonic lodges in Sweden on some formal evenings, and often in the UK by doormen and as formal wear for domestic serving staff, to differentiate them from the guests in their white ties and white waistcoats.
 

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I also find myself disagreeing with quite a bit. I will refrain from personal insults, and simply say that most of the above posters have it right. Black-tie is really not the pinnacle of formality; admittedly, our culture of tracksuit-chic is rapidly eroding traditional definitions, but I think for another 20 or 30 years white-tie will hold on and be considered the height of formalwear.

I must also lodge strenuous objections to the notion that "It hasn't been improved upon over time because it cannot be improved upon." Allow me to repost something I wrote a few weeks ago:
Although I have great respect for the "rules" of fashion and formalwear, I see no reason for stagnation. Styles evolve over time, dying off when they are no longer useful or morphing into new looks. We no longer wear sock garters because elastic (supposedly) solved the problem of droopy stockings. Likewise, the terms "white collar" and "blue collar" have all but vanished when used to distinguish class, as advances have allowed us to cheaply manufacture and maintain these garments.

There are many out in the wide world who would look upon the members of this board as dinosaurs - even those of us who aren't yet 30. In a way, it's true. Fashion has always had purists, diametrically opposed by those at the opposite end trying to push things forward. Without them, we might still be wearing frock coats!

Remember the origins of evening wear: keeping the smell of horses and other unpleasantries out of the house. From a certain perspective, the whole concept of evening wear is a vestigial holdover from generations past.
Why do we hold on to a method of dress whose primary goals included making sure dinner didn't smell like horsecrap? To suggest that black tie can't/won't be improved upon or changed is, at best, misguided optimism and at worst frightening naiveté. I think a majority of the population would grant that Prom Formal - multiple button jackets, colored vests, ties, and cummerbunds, clunky plastic square-toe shoes - is not really an acceptable way for adults to dress. However, you are going to get a lot more resistance when you bring up long ties and notch lapels. Yes, you can weep and gnash your teeth, making wild gesticulations about waiters, but you may as well try to beat the ocean unconscious.

I choose to advocate things like 1-buttons, peaked lapel dinner jackets because I like the style and have respect (not blind obedience) for the standards of yesteryear. I reserve no judgment for those bold enough to set upon their own path. What we are experiencing is simply a compressed version of evolution. Unfortunately for us, we happen to be on the losing side.
 

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Well said Flatline.

I would pick you up one comment though, and it is the difference between fashion and style/class.

Fashion has always had purists, diametrically opposed by those at the opposite end trying to push things forward
MY view is this, that fashion ceases to be fashion when it is no longer "fashionable" It then, depending on the cultural affect it has had, either becomes old fashioned, outmoded (mode = fashion in many Euro languages) traditional, retro or simply naff!

I prefer to use the two words style and class, two things which never go out of fashion (pardon the pun).

Because, as we al know, you can be stylish and exhibit class without being fashionable.
And we all see, every day, people of the opposite sort, i.e. wearing the latest fashions but with no style, not a clue about clothes and how to wear them, and generally looking like slobs! Despite their $500 jeans and their $500 trainers and their $500 hoodie!
 

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Peak of perfection?

I am now the proud possessor of SB peaked lapel dinner suits with both satin and grosgrain facing. The latter was in part acquired to provide grosgrain striped trousers to go with a couple of dinner jackets so faced in other materials.

This does not mean, however, that I shall never wear notched lapel again. I believe that to be a somewhat snobbish perspective. There's nothing, after all, to prevent a maitre d' from donning a peaked lapel dinner jacket and putting the lie to that fantasized distinction. The fact that maitre d's, whether wearing DJs or suits, are better dressed than 80% of their patrons (at least here in the SoCal sartorial wasteland) speaks volumes.
 

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However, you are going to get a lot more resistance when you bring up long ties and notch lapels. Yes, you can weep and gnash your teeth, making wild gesticulations about waiters, but you may as well try to beat the ocean unconscious.

Unfortunately for us, we happen to be on the losing side.
I'm old enough to remember the Nehru jacket tux, the ruffled shirt front and cuffs and the collar band formal shirt. All gone the way of the buggy whip. I hold out hope that the present fashion of long ties exposed shirt waists and puddled pants will soon join them in fashions trash heap.
 

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Well, I must say the OP is holding up under the barrage well enough...

The OP does not seem to be a bad guy and his blog is nice looking enough and even has a few good links. You've got to start somewhere. Nobody's right all the time (except maybe Sator). Even I was wrong once.

So maybe we could take it easy on the gent and offer our observations in a concilitory manner. This isn't SF, you know...

There: I just worked off a little karma....
 

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Morning dress - formal day wear
Stroller - semi-formal day wear
Black tie - semi-formal evening wear
White tie - formal evening wear.

.
Where would you put grey 'tailed' day attire (apart from only at the Races and certain sorts of wedding) in this hierarchy? To my mind they are between Morning Dress which is tailed and a Morning Suit which is not. The latterknown to Americans as a 'Stroller' for some inexplicable reason.
 

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Gee, that article does have some yowlers in it...

Still, it is not as bad as some other "expert" advice being bandied about lately (not here, of course).
 
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