Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Life Magazine gave extensive coverage of the NASA space program over the years and the publicity shots in the archive are a great source for looking at the styles of that era. Obviously, there is some artifice behind all of this, but NASA was trying to project (using real people) what might have been viewed as an average American look.
This shot of the Mercury 7 from 1959, I think says a lot

All the suits are thin lapelled, single breasted and natural shouldered. The color variation seems a lot wider than what we see today. Only Scott Carpenter's navy would be a conservative business dress color today and Gus Grissom's brick-brown houndstooth is almost pimp. Most of all, I'd like to get a suit in Sky blue sack like Gordon Cooper.

Ties are narrow, with muted colors but wild patterns. Note, the lack of visible pocket squares (though Glenn might be the most likely to square and he is not visible).

For the Forum Footwear Lovers

Apparently, argyles were pretty popular.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Bows

Glenn rocked the bow as well as any man ever (is that what they call a batwing?).

But he was not alone


(I'm not sure if thats Gordon Cooper or Dennis Quaid on the end there).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OCBD?


Despite Scott Carpenter Unistripe OCBD here, they mostly wore point collar shirts. Must be the military influence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sport coats when worn could be a little wild. Gordo and Gus


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Astronauts gotta keep fit


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Who Says Scott Carpenter is Boring


 

·
Banned
Joined
·
16,023 Posts
Funny I see this just as I'm watching a late-night PBS rerun about astronauts. Nice pictures as always. Some of the ties aren't really to my taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
...The color variation seems a lot wider than what we see today. Only Scott Carpenter's navy would be a conservative business dress color today...
And I think this is highly regrettable. In fact it's my #1 complaint with Brooks. No variation in color (just grey or navy), no variation within a color (all the greys are the same shade of grey), little variation in pattern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
Thanks for posting these pix. At some point when I got into TNSIL I sought out images of these guys along with the university shots that have become standard around here. Can anyone describe the ties for me: do they have a sort of art-deco feel to them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
Indeed, Thomas. I was thinking about the one of Gus in the sports jacket, which is different from most of the others. Maybe it was a time of transition away from that style, or maybe he was just out of style. I don't know and can't see the photo well enough. But I thought it was interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Indeed, Thomas. I was thinking about the one of Gus in the sports jacket, which is different from most of the others. Maybe it was a time of transition away from that style, or maybe he was just out of style. I don't know and can't see the photo well enough. But I thought it was interesting.

This is a crazy tie. Pretty standard 3 button soft roll natural shoulder jacket though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
And I think this is highly regrettable. In fact it's my #1 complaint with Brooks. No variation in color (just grey or navy), no variation within a color (all the greys are the same shade of grey), little variation in pattern.
Press seems to do a better job of mixing things up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,502 Posts
Dem space boys give us a lot of style in de late 60s in London ya know!
Especially the loafers, white socks and short jackets

Mixed up with the haircuts and style of the rude boys from Jamaica and we got the traditional skinhead skanking round the floor to the Skatalites, Pioneers, Upsetters, Melodians and the stylings of many other ska and reggae bands.

And here now for your visual and aural delight is a youtube clip that just about covers every aspect of the various related trends of then and now

 

·
Connoisseur
Joined
·
5,988 Posts
One thing to keep in mind when thinking of the early astronauts is that they were not choirboys, with the possible exception of John Glenn. They were rough and tumble daredevils who lived life on the edge. They weren't just jet fighter pilots, they were test pilots; and especially at that point in time one had to be almost fearless to do that.

With that in mind I suspect that everything about them, from the cars they drove to the clothes they wore, in some respect reflected how unique they were among ordinary men. In the late 60's I had the opportunity to serve in a U.S. Navy fighter squadron and the officer's parking lot was always filled with vehicles such as high powered motorcycles, Corvettes, and Jags.

I also had the opportunity to serve with and know a fighter pilot who would later go on to be one of our most storied space shuttle astronauts, flying five shuttle missions and one mission on a Russian space craft. Although he is retired from NASA now, about three years ago he honored me by sending me an autographed picture on which he referenced our past history.

Cruiser
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
Cruiser,

Thanks for the post. Well said: I thought The Right Stuff captured that pretty well, book and film. But it is still somewhat awe-inspiring to hear your first hand account.

Alden,

Thanks for putting up that picture: it was exactly the tie I had referred to. Don't think I'd ever wear that, but I'm too old to say never.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
The original Mercury 7 were rock stars, at a time when Elvis was in the Army, Jerry Lee had married his 14yr old cousin and Chuck Berry was in jail. The 7 were the best and brightest in America and were considered by the public to have almost talismatic qualities.

1959 was the height of the Cold War and the Russians were still ahead of us. These guys had to succeed and were built up by NASA and the media to be everything an all American man (or boy) could hope to be. Even today there is an aura that still surrounds them.

Lets face it, Space Travel has become common place and is available to anyone who can write a large enough check. This is a far cry from the time when the original 7 were selected from a pool of thousands of the best military pilots America had to offer.

The book and movie "The Right Stuff" not only succeed in casting the astronaughts, but also in communicating the unique blend of macho, skill, control and perecpetion that all of the men shared. Each time they went into the air, there was a very real chance they would not return. At one time the mortality rate for test pilots was more than 50%.

Best,

Ross
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top