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Nat King Cole, Diana Krall, Chopin nocturnes played exquisitely by the late Eugene Istomin, Dexter Gordon, Bessie Smith, Sarah Vaughn. And the divine Kiri te Kanawa. Plus a whole lot of Hindi film songs and ghazals from the sixties, and north and south Indian classical music. I've long had music as an integral part of my daily life.
 

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This morning we are listening to The Oak Ridge Boy's, singing "Leaving Louisiana In The Broad Daylight," from the Oak Ridge Boys Essentials album. ..one of their hits once included in a Dukes of Hazard episode. :amazing:
The last couple of days I have been listening to The Shadows, a British group that was famous in India in the fifties and sixties. Cliff Richard, an Anglo-Indian who was born in Lucknow, India, and emigrated to the UK, was a popular singer there, and he was accompanied by The Shadows. I think Richard still holds several records in the UK. They are all listed here:


I am so-so with him, but The Shadows are great!
 

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Ah, The Temptations! They were before my time in the States, but I have heard enough of the Motown sound and songs to recognize the name, and My Girl is considered a landmark song by those of my native-born American friends, at least those of them belonging to my age group. A lot of that music was also in an old film called The Big Chill, and I saw the house where that movie was made, in South Carolina not far from the Marine Base in Beaufort (The Great Santini, starring The Great Robert Duvall, was also made there, shot in part on the Base ).

I am not very familiar with rock and its variations, being primarily focused on be-bop jazz from a specific period (1933 -- the purported date of the Lester Young/Coleman Hawkins battle royal in Kansas City -- to 1970) and opera -- as far as Western music goes.

As for the gorgeous lady in the photograph, I can only hazard a wild guess, with apologies in advance if I am mistaken: Might that be Mrs Eagle? If I am right, you are one lucky chap!
 

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Western: Miles Davis, Dexter Gordon, Sonny Stitt, and all those jazz greats. Kiri te Kanawa, my all-time favourite soprano (arias and crossover songs, especially the Princess Street Orchestra LP/CD). Nat King Cole. Yves Montand, Francoise Hardy.

Eastern: Classic Ghazals by Talat Mahmood, the King of Ghazals. The incomparable Lata Mangeshkar, the equally wonderful Suman Kalyanpur, my favourite male voice Mukesh, the lovely voice of Hemant Kumar.

I can work on my stamp collection and be listening to the thousands of songs I have recorded using the wonderful Audacity program -- and best of all, it is free. It is the perfect way to disappear from the morose present, and into the sonorous world of music...
 

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Chopin Nocturnes, all 21 of them, perhaps the loveliest in all the world. My all-time favourite pianist for these nocturnes is the late great Eugene Istomin. Plus Etudes. And Debussy. Great music for early mornings when I am writing or working on stamps.

Istomin was the heart and soul of a Trio, along with Isaac Stern and Leonard Rose. Somehow, the way he plays those Chopin nocturnes speaks almost personally to me. It is a privilege to be able to hear Istomin play them in these recordings. I wish I could have heard him live. Here is Opus 9: No 1 in B-Flat Minor:

 

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Music to start the weekend with: The incomparable McCoy Tyner on the piano, in a virtuoso performance some time back, with Freddie Hubbard , trumpet; Joe Henderson tenor sax; and Louis Hayes on the drums:

 

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@Corcovado I'm not as experienced in listening to this branch of singing, but it does have a Motown sound to it. Nice.

Most of my jazz vinyl and CD collection is be-bop, roughly 1936 to 1965. I think of all the greats as belonging to that period, but that is just my personal taste.
 

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Some of the Motown songs (Smokey Robinson, for instance) are popular enough for most jazz and R&B aficionados to have heard. The first item I heard featuring the Motown sound was Marvin Gaye, years ago, singing "Heard it Through the Grapevine". I heard it as the opening song as the titles came on in the film The Big Chill.


My knowledge of rock, R&B and other similar styles is quite limited, partly because I did not grow up in the US. Jazz immediately caught my attention because there are striking structural parallels to classical Indian music (I grew up in India), especially in the sense that both kinds of music, although vastly different in sound, are free-form and expositional. There is no set pattern written down, say, like Western classical music, but simply a basic theme (raagas and raaginis in the Indian classical form) which is then expanded according to what moves the individual singer or exponent. Bebop jazz captures this similarity very nicely, R&B or rock styles perhaps less so.

There is an older tradition of American singing that I like very much: Nat King Cole is eternal, as are Ella Fitzgerald, Carmen McCrae, Bessie Smith, Sarah Vaughan. They are wonderful singers and great exponents of a style that was born in the early part of the last century. Billie Holiday, Josephine Baker, and others are very early practitioners of this strand in popular music.

Music evolves, migrates and transforms itself, sometimes across different cultures. Here is a striking example. It's Bombay Royale, an Australian-Indian group out of Melbourne (I think) combining all sorts of strands, but taking off from the Hindi film music of the 1960s Bombay Cinema B-movies and garish thrillers and murder mysteries. This one is called Jaan Pehchhan Ho which in Hindi means "Let's get to Know Each Other". It was originally created for an over-the-top, exuberant night club number in the 1965 film Gumnaam.


And here is the original from the film, the singer is the iconic Mohammed Rafi. Replete with blaring trumpets, masks, drainpipe trousers, sheath dresses and what not. (Note: Click on the Youtube link, it should work in spite of the message saying not available)


Enjoy.
 

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Here's one of my eternal favourites, Dexter Gordon on the tenor saxophone. A gifted, wonderful player.

Body and Soul (Dexter Gordon in Round Midnight. And yes, that is Herbie Hancock on the piano. The Frenchman watching Dex play is the actor Francois Cluzot). Just lovely. The cinematography is exquisite. And Dex's white shirt, loose tie, and braces are simply perfect for this occasion.

 

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Wonderful!

A beautiful clip.

I'm sure another musician or someone with an understanding of music and the instrument can better appreciate such than me, but I certainly enjoy it.

From the film Round Midnight, yes?
Thanks, Flanders. Yes, the clip is from Round Midnight. Tavernier is a great filmmaker. Have you seen Coup de Torchon (Clean Slate)? With the wonderful actor Philippe Noiret.

I am no musician, but in the same way I can appreciate a fine film without being a filmmaker or cinematographer or even an actor, I can appreciate music through all the listening I have done over the years, both Western and Indian music.

One of the very special things about music is the feeling it gives you after a long evening of listening. You turn things off and go to bed, and the silence is filled with afterimages or echoes of the music, which is still reverberating somewhere in your auditory cortex or frontal lobes, or even short-term memory. It is one of those pleasurable, satisfying moments in life, when you feel that, in spite of all the things we have done to screw this world and ourselves up, there are redeeming aspects, and gentle benedictions -- those saving graces without which life would be hard to bear.
 

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Other than a misspent youth between the ages of roughly 16 and 26 when I had a great fondness for over-imbibing, largely the ravages of age, etc. Recall going on sick call in the Air Force for flu symptoms, and when the doc asked how I'm doing otherwise, I told him I thought maybe i drank too much.. His response? "We all do, it's so cheap!" 😆

Time and place.
I spent some time in my youth consuming substantial quantities of scotch, cognac, gin, vodka and a range of other liquors. As time went on, I decided I had finished my quota, and now drink tea and that's great. I suppose for some of us, there is a time for everything. I have fond memories of good times with old friends.
 

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I have a great fondness for fine beer or wine with food, but over the last 45+ years that was constituted of occasionally 1 to 2 of either with dinner, or an apertif, or a liquor after dinner. Now it's 0. Tea for breakfast is a pleasure, Prefer it neat.
I make my own blend of two Indian leaf teas, Assam (which is basically an oolong tea) and Darjeeling, the champagne of teas. This blend is made every month or so and stored in a vintage Brooke Bond tin. And I make tea early in the morning in the Indian way: I mix a cup of milk with 3 cups of water in a medium saucepan and sprinkle two and a half heaping teaspoons of my blended tea leaf mixture on top. This is brought to a boil and then the flame is tuurned off. It is stirred and left to simmer down for about a minute -- the longer you leave it, the stronger the tea is. The mixture is then sieved into a thermos flask, and it is drunk in half-cups through the day.

For me, this is the perfect Indian tea. None of that spicy stuff in masala chai for me, LOL. I used to add some sugar to tea, but after becoming diabetic, I decided to halve the sugar and add some splenda instead. Sometimes I drink it without any sweetener. I carry the thermos in a briefcase when I go out, and when I worked at the university, many of my students would share a cup with me -- they loved it!
 

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Gorgeous! Is this group the Wes Montgomery Trio, with Melvin Rhyne on the organ and Paul Parker on drums? Wes did play with Thelonious Monk for a period of time, I think -- a Quintet before the Trio, perhaps.
 
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