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Not sure I agree with the author of the article re: 'Capital is mobile, but labor is not.' People move all the time. A family that started in California, soon might find members in Illinois, Texas, Florida, etc. I think the reality is that people need to go where the opportunities are, not just sit around and complain that there aren't any opportunities within commuting distance of their childhood neighborhoods.
From a micro sense, it is sad to see a 100 year old bookshop close its doors, or a neighborhood store shut down after the Walmart moves in. I think from an evolutionary perspective, our horizons tend to be more localized and it's hard to appreciate the effects of globalization. But it is better overall in the macro sense. A single mother of 3 can certainly provide a greater quality of life shopping at a nearby Walmart than spending 20%+ more on the same items at Moe's Market. So while Moe got burned, this single mother and her children benefit, and many more people in similar situations, etc.
 

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Unfortunately, a phrase in the last paragraph spoiled this wholly for me. "The mosques go up..." as the world goes down in flames, essentially. That xenophobic attitude is a large part of what is holding the West back these days.

That said, I largely disagree with the premise of the argument. The concern is that capital and indeed most all industry is being moved offshore for the sake of the bottom line. However, with global instability and the rising price of energy, companies are increasingly finding that remaining close to the the consumer base has its advantages. Brooks Brothers, in an NYT article sometime last year, indicated that a large part of the motivation for keeping at least the tie making in the US was cheaper overall cost, and ready ability to oversee production of the product, without having to wait for shipment of a sample from China or points East (South? North? West?)

It stands to reason then, that as energy prices rise again, as they inevitably will in the coming years, that a new wave of entrepreneurs will be more willing to tap local and regional, rather than global, resources.

Of course, it also appears that the author's motivation is largely based on his myopic view of the West he knew as a youth. The commercialization of success and the rise of a litigious society have left a foul taste in his mouth. That said, he offers no alternative. Law school, medical school and all the rest require not only superior test taking skills, but a commitment to hard work and a strong character. Indeed, as his world becomes more corrupt, should the author turn a critical eye he may well find that lawyers and other professionals are the bastions of his ideals, rather than their downfall.
 

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scl10,

Unfortunately, a phrase in the last paragraph spoiled this wholly for me. "The mosques go up..." as the world goes down in flames, essentially. That xenophobic attitude is a large part of what is holding the West back these days.
Occidentalism knows no finer advocate than you! I am all for religious pluralism in the West (a few new mosques would steady the construction industry) however I won't hold my breath for any new churches or synagouges in Mecca.

Karl
 
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