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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
While fiction is not technically correct, as there most certainly is a border, the idea that this is a boundary that it is a rigid obstacle physically separating the two countries for most of it's length is comical. As a vacationer for roughly 35 years in north central Vermont I've often seen this border and also crossed it (legally!) a few times. And while I in no way wish to demean the valiant efforts of our ICE, the whole affair is really quite casual.

I don't profess knowledge of any substantial nature of this whole long national border, and while I know there are formal border crossing points since I've used them, there are also long stretches where things are far more relaxed. For a start, there are more than a few lakes and such, both larger and smaller, which span this border. And I've seen no evidence of chains or mines dividing them, or a fleet of midget submarines prowling for inebriated fishermen who wander from one side to the other and back again.

But beyond these bodies of water there is nothing more than grass or woodland separating our two nations. And in some places there are towns neatly, and sometimes humorously divided by it as well. Without wishing to get it in trouble, I was just surveying one of these Vermont towns. And not only are there roads that appear to run unguarded across the border, but there's an entire main street where one side is evidently in the U.S. and the other Canadian. Do these neighbors apply for a visa when they cross the street to visit each other? And what of households which even themselves are so divided? Do international protocols permit connubial intersection? ;)

And these issues are hardly limited to the Vermont Free Republic. Similarly, I was taking a virtual tour of the border between the State of Maine and New Brunswick Provence and what I've observed in Vermont is there also replicated. My favorite being a smaller country club having its club house in Canada and the adjoining parking lot in the U.S. with absolutely no division between them! :D
 

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World's longest unguarded border--despite the best efforts of fear-mongers to make us believe that it needs to be fenced.
 

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The west is different than farther east. One guy dad worked with was driving on some back road and drove on the wrong side of a large mud puddle. A number of border patrol jumped out of the bushes, and If I remember correctly his auto was impounded. He might have had to go to court. Sometimes government steps over its boundaries. Neighbors used to visit each other. Before 911 I don't think we needed any identity to cross the border either way. It is time it goes back that way. Government does not own us. I've worked with southern undocumented migrant workers. How are farmers going to get their crops planted and harvested? White citizens are not interested. All they want is a government handout (taxpayers handout) when not employed. Orchards can be a great place to work. Fresh air. Peaceful. Not confined to a building. Fine scenery. The list goes on. Some people are very fast with their hands and can make good money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
World's longest unguarded border--despite the best efforts of fear-mongers to make us believe that it needs to be fenced.
Maybe they can keep the moose out! :D

One guy dad worked with was driving on some back road and drove on the wrong side of a large mud puddle. A number of border patrol jumped out of the bushes, and If I remember correctly his auto was impounded.
They guard the mud puddles!?!?

Bigly!!!
 

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The borders in VT have become much more distinct since 911 and even more so in the last year. I was doing some field work at the old Gerald Bull Space Research Facility in Troy, VT. While we were there, we made sure to not even step into the cleared area that is the border. When we finished, we though it would be a good idea to go to the border patrol to let them know who we were and why we were there. It turns out they had been watching us in hidden cameras we never saw. They also had a good idea who we were from our license plate.

If you cross the border on one of these small "unguarded" roads, you will be seen and investigated. According to the Border guard, up until a couple of years ago, the most illegal traffic was smuggling cigarettes and booze from the US into Canada.

The border does run through the village of Derby Line (and through the center of the library). For generations, locals crossed back and forth without any controls. Families lived on both sides of the border. It has been difficult but they apparently have more freedom now than right after 911. One thing that helps is everyone pretty much knows one another and reports suspicious activities.

There was a gun smuggling ring bringing in guns from the US to Canada. Someone from the US would go to the library and eave a backpack with guns in it, and someone from Canada would grab it and take it into Canada. They were apparently caught because the people doing this were dressed up, very clean (not country folk as you mostly see here except for tourists), and not known to anyone. I believe it was the librarians who had them checked out by the police which destroyd the smuggling ring.
 
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