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Great pictures. I love the Bermuda shorts with loafers look. This book deserves its legendary status. The boys just look so wholesome, don't they, compared to kids today?

On the one hand, it seems like a different generation (well, it was a different generation -- any of those guys is old enough to be my father). But on the other hand, I started prep school just 12 years after this book was published, and much of it looks familiar. In my prep school days, just like in the pictures, we still rowed with oars made of wood instead of carbon fiber, our coxswains wore loafers and yelled through megaphones strapped to their heads (no electronic assistance), and we all carried our 8's and 4's to the water wearing thick socks (to row in) and sneakers or moccasins (which were left behind on the dock).
 

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Great pictures. I love the Bermuda shorts with loafers look. This book deserves its legendary status. The boys just look so wholesome, don't they, compared to kids today?
Do they? And compared to which campuses? The other thing is that the photographers selected looks that they liked -- it may not necessarily be representative of the students at large.
 

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Do they? And compared to which campuses? The other thing is that the photographers selected looks that they liked -- it may not necessarily be representative of the students at large.
I lived in Cambridge for two years and spent a good deal of time on the Harvard campus. Compared to the dress of students now, those pictured do seem to dress better. You could argue that the photographer selected what he would like to document. But I don't think the style that was documented was the exception to the rule of dress at these schools. The book was produced because it was generally known to the Japanese that a particular style existed at these schools. It is also important to know that years ago, maybe not in the late 60s so much as earlier, schools like Harvard were more parochial. If you read some of the articles from the Harvard school paper from the 50s and 60s, you'll see rather negative comments regarding the sartorial influences of students from the "west," eg wearing colorful shirts. Colleges weren't always the international institutions we have today.
 

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Point taken. But I do think colleges are better off having a wide variety of students instead of a select group of white Wonder bread. Working with fellow students from all over the globe has made me a better person.
 

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But I do think colleges are better off having a wide variety of students instead of a select group of white Wonder bread.
I think you could make this point more effectively without the unnecessary anti-WASP rhetoric.
 

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Okay, diversity is better than a bunch of white males only. It wasn't intended as "anti-WASP rhetoric" at all though.
 

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Wait a minute, how did we shift from a discussion of wholesome looking kids to the merits of ethnic diversity? Anybody can look clean-cut and wholesome, regardless of race. Or am I missing something?
 

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You're quite right, they can, and I'm not really sure where I was going with that discussion myself!
 

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I was surprised by the large number of students wearing t-shirts. For those here who would have folks believe that wearing such casual wear is trad sacrilege, I'd refer them to this.
 

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I was surprised by the large number of students wearing t-shirts. For those here who would have folks believe that wearing such casual wear is trad sacrilege, I'd refer them to this.
True. I was most surprised by the lack of cuffs and the general length of the pants, or lack thereof. Oh, also surprised by the number of untucked oxford shirts.
 

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I was surprised by the large number of students wearing t-shirts. For those here who would have folks believe that wearing such casual wear is trad sacrilege, I'd refer them to this.
I think the t-shirts look fine because of how they're worn, and because most of them seem to be simple college t-shirts. Contrast that with the cutesy little black emo t-shirts kids wear today with their skinny jeans, or the t-shirts with gym shorts to class crowd. The ones in the photographs are miles better. Then again, I'm of the opinion that t-shirts are perfectly acceptable within the trad canon.
 

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I think the t-shirts look fine because of how they're worn, and because most of them seem to be simple college t-shirts. Contrast that with the cutesy little black emo t-shirts kids wear today with their skinny jeans, or the t-shirts with gym shorts to class crowd. The ones in the photographs are miles better. Then again, I'm of the opinion that t-shirts are perfectly acceptable within the trad canon.
I'm with you - I think the t-shirts look fine. It's just that some people on this board really disparage jeans and t-shirts as looking cruddy. Well, maybe so, but as you pointed out, such looks fit squarely in the trad canon as demonstrated in the book.
 

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True. I was most surprised by the lack of cuffs and the general length of the pants, or lack thereof. Oh, also surprised by the number of untucked oxford shirts.
Yup. I'm not sure if this will ruffle feathers, but looking at these pictures made me think that these fellows were not any more stylish than current day students. They still managed to look shleppy, it's just that they had different tools to do it with.
 

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When I was in college I considered myself to be rather "stylish." I gander to say that quite a few of my friends (including girls) considered me to be rather stylish as well b/c they used to ask for style advice regularly.

My typical uniform consisted of a plain or slogan tee, "designer" jeans (such as 7 for All Mankind or Paper Denim & Cloth) and some "retro" (1970 knock-off) tennis shoe that was often a bright color like yellow, red, or blue. I wore fake diamond studs in both ears ("headlights") and usually wore a sweatband that was color-coordinated to my "outfit." On colder days I wore a hooded sweat shirt.

I wouldn't complain about some of these kids wearing tees or untucking their shirts for chrissake. While they may not all live up to the insane standards of AAAC, they smoke the modern competition.
 

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Most of the pants looked uncomfortably tight to me.

I like the casual untucked OCBD, shorts and loafers look.
Agreed re the pants looking tight. Actually, another thought that I had looking at the pictures was they were a little homoerotic. I'm not knocking alternative lifestyles, but there were lots of pictures of young men's backsides covered with tight pants in that book.
 

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Yup. I'm not sure if this will ruffle feathers, but looking at these pictures made me think that these fellows were not any more stylish than current day students. They still managed to look shleppy, it's just that they had different tools to do it with.
I would agree and add that the "look" isn't really that radically different today: maybe more jeans than chinos, more flip-flops than sperry's, or longer shorts. That, and girls hardly ever wear dresses anymore (though at least compared to then there were a lot more of them on campus when I was going to school :devil:). But the basic school sweatshirt/shorts/tennis shoes look is more or less as prevalent on most colleges now as it was then.
 
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