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I recently had my first bespoke garments made - a suit and a blazer. I chose basic cloths for both as it was my first bespoke commission.

The blazer iss hopsack, and I don't know what the suit weave is called. Both are VBC

As it turned out, the blazer looked to fit much better than my suit, even though both had the same measurements. My tailor said that the hopsack material drapes better due to the half lined and minimally padded construction and Italian cut, whereas the suit was closer to an English cut had more structure. He recommended an English fabric for future commissions.

Esentially, I think he was saying you should use italian fabrics for Italian cuts and English fabrics for English cuts. Is there any truth to this, or was it just that the particular suit fabric I chose was suboptimal?
 

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I recently had my first bespoke garments made - a suit and a blazer. I chose basic cloths for both as it was my first bespoke commission.

The blazer iss hopsack, and I don't know what the suit weave is called. Both are VBC

As it turned out, the blazer looked to fit much better than my suit, even though both had the same measurements. My tailor said that the hopsack material drapes better due to the half lined and minimally padded construction and Italian cut, whereas the suit was closer to an English cut had more structure. He recommended an English fabric for future commissions.

Esentially, I think he was saying you should use italian fabrics for Italian cuts and English fabrics for English cuts. Is there any truth to this, or was it just that the particular suit fabric I chose was suboptimal?
Inherent in your questions, is a world of other questions. The term bespoke is often used to mean many different things. It seems odd to me that a tailor who makes the garments themselves would be making some jackets jackets of such dissimilar cut and construction. But there are both many different cuts from both traditions, and also many different types of construction from both traditions.

Similarly, both Italy and the U.K. spin and weave many different cloths for suiting, the best from each being very fine quality. But I'm not sure that you can characterize each as simply as you ask the question, the qualities of both can overlap depending upon the particular cloth at issue. But as a generalization, with many exceptions, Italian cloth might be characterized as often having as softer hand than some British cloth. Would stiffer cloth be better suited to more structured tailoring? Maybe.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. The patterns will probably be changed a couple of more times. He may indeed have a preference for English cloths for suits and other jackets less concern. As far as patterns go some tailors certainly draw a new pattern for each style, a pattern directions for the style. Other tailors use one pattern which they adapt for every style. I think the separate pattern are a bit more distinguished. He even goes further by using pattern methods from other countries. He sounds like a very interesting tailor to me. Somebody I would like to meet.
 

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While I have no doubt that different weights of cloth and different weave will behave differently, I’m having a hard time understanding why an English cloth would be better suited to an English cut.
 

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Assuming you have had some level of interior design in your house there is a likelihood that you have some heavy drapes and perhaps some sheer curtains. Perhaps not too surprisingly the drapes are called drapes - they are heavier typically and due to the weight and the way they are attached to the wall it will affect the way the fabric hangs more than a sheer fabric that may just be blowing in the wind! In the same way heavier fabrics may drape on one's frame more predictably and more fluidly than a light fabric, at least in theory. All things equal heavier fabrics probably drape a bit better.

Having said that I am not wholly convinced that the weight of the fabric is of tantamount importance. Indeed, in your example the lighter fabric drapes better. The garment is also of lighter structure. What I am hearing is that you have a fairly structured garment made with a lighter fabric and that it doesn't drape well. I suppose there may be some merit to the thought that heavier canvas and lining may somehow interfere or impede with the drape of a light fabric and that a heavier fabric might be better suited for that type of construction. At first I was thinking that the cut would have nothing to do with it because of the "same measurements." But that actually may be false if indeed he changed the cut of the suit drastically. A "drape" cut probably would benefit from heavier fabric. None the less, I have lots of very light fabric suits and they seem to drape well even with decent structure although most of my cuts are "continental." So I am not wholly convinced with your tailor's argument although I understand that it could make sense.
 
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