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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read an old post on SF where Manton implied that wearing a single breasted suit to a social event such as a cocktail reception marks one as a "clod." Is this really the general concensus (amoung sartorial types at least - I'm not concerned with the avaerage joe)?

I've never heard this before. I know that technically DBs are less formal than SBs, but I've never heard that they are de riguer for classy social occasions.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That does seem rather harsh. Having said that, Manton rarely gets it wrong.
That's basically what I was thinking. I mean Manton wrote a freaking book! But I still have a hard time getting my head around this concept.
 

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I read an old post on SF where Manton implied that wearing a single breasted suit to a social event such as a cocktail reception marks one as a "clod." Is this really the general concensus (amoung sartorial types at least - I'm not concerned with the avaerage joe)?

I've never heard this before. I know that technically DBs are less formal than SBs, but I've never heard that they are de riguer for classy social occasions.

Weigh in...
I find the DB more formal than a SB lounge suit, not less. Perhaps that is what the esteemed Manton is alluding to. That said, depending on one's society, it might be the cleanest t-shirt with the fewest holes! :rolleyes:
 

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I have never heard that either. I certainly think that in this day and age it would be hard to find someone to call you a clod in DB suit.
I think you'd be hard pressed to define someone as a "clod" if he took the time to put on a suit...let alone a DB one! I have never heard this rule. And even it if I had, I would have argued the point.
 

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I very rarely see DBs in any context, and have no idea in what social circle they'd be "required" for a cocktail party. Certainly not any social circle that I'd care to circulate in.

Not that I speak from experience, but a well-fitting DB would be a nice way to stand out at a party where folks were generally wearing suits.

Was Manton's post from 1940's-era StyleForum?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have never heard that either. I certainly think that in this day and age it would be hard to find someone to call you a clod in DB suit.
I think you'd be hard pressed to define someone as a "clod" if he took the time to put on a suit...let alone a DB one!
Maybe I wasn't clear - he wasn't calling people clods for wearing a DB. He was calling them a clod for NOT wearing DB.
 

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Oh, I was confused. I still think if you put on a suit and tie VERY FEW people will even be cognizant of that social situations dress code. I see people all the time who don't bother to wear a jacket at the nicest restaurant in town. The outfit du jour seems to be jeans and whatever shirt is the least wrinkled.
That being said, I love the look of a DB suit or blazer and shall endeavor to wear them more based on this discussion. :)
 

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I still think if you put on a suit and tie VERY FEW people will even be cognizant of that social situations dress code. I see people all the time who done bother to wear a jacket at the nicest restaurant in town. The outfit du jour seems to be jeans and whatever shirt is the least wrinkled.
While you are absolutely correct and I agree with you, I think Louche was referring to the strict sartorial types. Not your average joe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
While you are absolutely correct and I agree with you, I think Louche was referring to the strict sartorial types. Not your average joe.
Exactly Chicago. I am well past the point of being concerned with the opinions of the ignorant sartorial masses. I'm asking YOU GUYS what your opinion is. While I'm not a total stickler, I enjoy following "the rules" of proper attire when possible and would like your input.
 

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Exactly Chicago. I am well past the point of being concerned with the opinions of the ignorant sartorial masses. I'm asking YOU GUYS what your opinion is. While I'm not a total stickler, I enjoy following "the rules" of proper attire when possible and would like your input.
Sorry if I wasn't clear in my earlier response. I guess my point was (1) I am not aware or a "DB is more formal or correct" rule, (2) If one did exist, it's incorrect and, (3) wear one if the mood strikes you and you have the body type for it. When worn on the right body type, a DB suit makes a dashing statement. When worn by shorter and heavier men, it makes them look like a fireplugs IMO.
 

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This sounds really odd to me, frankly, and I have to say I would be surprised to find that manton had ever offered such an opinion.

He might have said that a DB can offer an extra dash of sophistication--I do find that when I wear one of my DB suits or blazers more people tend to comment on my attire--but that's hardly the same thing as saying one would be a "clod" to wear an SB suit.

Can you give us a link to the SF post in question?
 

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I like to wear a high roll, 3-button navy suit for evening events because I consider it a bit more formal looking than the 2-button; showing less tie. I also change some other tailoring details which is off on a tangent.

Back to the plot; I could see a similar argument made with a DB v. SB lounge suit. The exception being that I would think a DB suit would be more formal than the same SB at a social occasion. When we dispose of vests DB:SB relationships invert IMHO.

The DB would only be considered less formal than SB in formal wear itself; where the vested jacket clearly trumps the DB jacket.

I can see that wearing a typical 2-button, daytime, business suit to a social function is a little less than optimum. I tend to avoid that myself (in the worst case add a pocket square and lose the repp tie for satin or basketweave.) Calling someone a clod might be a little too rigid, but it could be tradition! :devil:
 

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I take you at your word that Manton said that but find what he said rather odd. As far as I'm concern not wearing a DB suit to a casual evening event would be just peachy and in no way clodish.
When I write MY book I shall say so.
 

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I think Manton has many things attributed to him which he probably didn't say ....

However, the few times he has responded to my posts, he has made it clear that he prefers the db over the sb, with 85s cloth. I also prefer to wear a db over a sb, but they are not so readily availablr in rtw, which is what I buy. My last db was a medium gray flannel db (6x2) with side vents from BB. I prefer a super 100 to the softer, more wrinkle prone, fabrics.
 

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It's BOGUS!

I haven't even seen anyone in a double-breasted jacket for several years now!! Well there is one local weathercaster, but he dresses like trailer park trash (no insult intended towards tailer park trash)!
A local tailor told me peak lapel SB suits are the new DB suits. I am inclined to agree.
 
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