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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So it goes without saying that part of the whole Trad style is a bit of austerity, conservatism, and thrift. Many Trads not only keep clothing for years and years, but go out of their Tradly way to celebrate this fact. I think this is great. But I have to ask - do you continue to wear suits and/or jackets that have developed a wool shine at the elbows or on the seat? Seeing as how the navy blazer is a de facto Trad garment, I am sure that shiny wool is nothing new to you all. Navy wool shines particularly quickly. What's your take on this - does the shine add charm? Or does it just make the garment look bad?

Just to clarify, I am NOT asking about ways to prevent or remedy shine - thats been discussed to no clear answer. I've accepted that shine happens - its a fact. I'm curious about how a real Trad deals with it.
 

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While I will do everything possible to remedy the shine of which you speak, In the absence of success in such efforts, I will continue to wear the garment in question and endure the shine. However, as the shine evolves to a thinned area of fabric, I will sadly and lovingly(;)) discard the coat/trousers...hopefully before it/they fail me! :)
 

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I see Trad as a style of clothing and that is all. Some see it as a life style, a method of behaving, perhaps a membership in a socio-economic group that favors owning a certain type of dog or motorcar.

Maybe some of the folks who see Trad as more than clothing do so in jest. I guess someone who take this Trad stuff seriously will have to answer the question.

At first, I typed Trad Jazz, but that is a different matter. although something I also like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I see Trad as a style of clothing and that is all. Some see it as a life style, a method of behaving, perhaps a membership in a socio-economic group that favors owning a certain type of dog or motorcar.

Maybe some of the folks who see Trad as more than clothing do so in jest. I guess someone who take this Trad stuff seriously will have to answer the question.

At first, I typed Trad Jazz, but that is a different matter. although something I also like.
I'm not saying that I, or others, take Trad overly seriously. All I mean is that the look has an undeniable bit of origin in the conservative. As such I would think that those that tend to the look would naturally tend to a conservative attitude about "squeezing the life out" of things. I'm really just curious if people continue to wear woolens once they inevitably get all shiny. I figured this group was much more likely to do so than the presumably, and comparatively, more "of the moment" (read more disposable and less likely to be around long enough to shine) aesthetic esposused by the group on the Fashion Forum.
 

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I'm not saying that I, or others, take Trad overly seriously. All I mean is that the look has an undeniable bit of origin in the conservative. As such I would think that those that tend to the look would naturally tend to a conservative attitude about "squeezing the life out" of things. I'm really just curious if people continue to wear woolens once they inevitably get all shiny. I figured this group was much more likely to do so than the presumably, and comparatively, more "of the moment" (read more disposable and less likely to be around long enough to shine) aesthetic esposused by the group on the Fashion Forum.
That is fair and reasonable. I guess I am not very qualified to reply as I am retired so my clothes seldom reach that state and because of that I can afford to dispose of them sooner rather than later.
 

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I'm on the keep-wearing side, but everything has qualifications. If I have something that I wear so much and for so long, then when it gets to the state you describe I would probably (1) have already bought another, and (2) relegated the original to alternative use. For example, a navy suit jacket will be shiny in its elbows eventually, so that I might not want it to be my go-to suit, but it will still be perfectly fine for a day of filing in the office or for traveling.

The clothes that get the most wear and deterioration in my experience are ocbds and tweedy sport jackets, and I wear them well beyond when they start to show signs of age--but of course they don't get shiny. One of my favourite ocbds is an old, frayed BB that is as soft as can be. It still has a few years left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm on the keep-wearing side, but everything has qualifications. If I have something that I wear so much and for so long, then when it gets to the state you describe I would probably (1) have already bought another, and (2) relegated the original to alternative use. For example, a navy suit jacket will be shiny in its elbows eventually, so that I might not want it to be my go-to suit, but it will still be perfectly fine for a day of filing in the office or for traveling.

The clothes that get the most wear and deterioration in my experience are ocbds and tweedy sport jackets, and I wear them well beyond when they start to show signs of age--but of course they don't get shiny. One of my favourite ocbds is an old, frayed BB that is as soft as can be. It still has a few years left.
I entirely agree with your logic here. I think the answer is to relegate to alternative use those garments which are shiny. And I'm fully with you on tweeds and OCBDs - the fact that they fray instead of shine is a huge bonus IMO; I'd rather wear a frayed garment than a shiny garment ANY day of the week. I think fraying is much more in line with the sort of patina that many find desirable - shine not so much.
 

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For me, new jackets/blazers developing a shine would be relegated to less dressy situations. But I always need at least one navy blazer that can go right to the boardroom and look smashing.

To that point -- what are the best ways to avoid/delay developing the "shine' to begin with?

With my recently acquired BB sack blazer, I'm avoiding setting my elbows on anything....

I don't wear any suits often enough to be terribly concerned, yet.
 

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I entirely agree with your logic here. I think the answer is to relegate to alternative use those garments which are shiny. And I'm fully with you on tweeds and OCBDs - the fact that they fray instead of shine is a huge bonus IMO; I'd rather wear a frayed garment than a shiny garment ANY day of the week. I think fraying is much more in line with the sort of patina that many find desirable - shine not so much.
Sorry, I don't know much about "Trad" as it's known here. I see that there is a component of thrift, no? Not just a style with regional variations.

To that end, talking about shiny elbows, has anyone ever had garment repairs made to camouflage wear-like the suede elbow patches? I realize it's not appropriate for something like a navy blazer; but as mentioned above, tweed jackets seem likely candidates. Or is that taking thrift too far?
 

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So it goes without saying that part of the whole Trad style is a bit of austerity, conservatism, and thrift. Many Trads not only keep clothing for years and years, but go out of their Tradly way to celebrate this fact. I think this is great. But I have to ask - do you continue to wear suits and/or jackets that have developed a wool shine at the elbows or on the seat? Seeing as how the navy blazer is a de facto Trad garment, I am sure that shiny wool is nothing new to you all. Navy wool shines particularly quickly. What's your take on this - does the shine add charm? Or does it just make the garment look bad?

Just to clarify, I am NOT asking about ways to prevent or remedy shine - thats been discussed to no clear answer. I've accepted that shine happens - its a fact. I'm curious about how a real Trad deals with it.
I have no problem wearing worn clothing as long as it's clean and neatly pressed. Once something becomes threadbare, I only wear it if I can't afford something new. I grew up wearing patched up hand-me-downs, so I'm not too proud. To me shiny elbows, knees, and seat are only problematic if they extreme. As a side note, amen to the navy-blue shining fastest. I go through a navy blazer every 18 months or so.

As a general rule, I try to give clothes away before they're worn out so that the next guy can get some use out of them.

On the other hand, clothing that is both well-worn, and wrinkled, and dirty just makes you look like a hobo (a rant that has roots in my job as a suit salesman).
 

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none wore out

I dont see many jackets or suits with shiny spots. I suppose so few people wear nice clothes often enough in southern rural areas to wear them out. Almost all the thrift stores around north georgia have dress clothing thats hardly worn.
Cheers,Cosmo:drunken_smilie:
 

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I wear sharkskin if I want shiny. . . :cool:

But to address your question - a little shine in that navy suit or blazer never hurt anyone. There is a point past which the shine starts looking bad, but I can't quantify or even characterize that point. I do know it when I see it, though. Then it's new navy suit or blazer time.
 

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I have first and second tiers in my clothing and the shiny item would take up residence in the second tier until I decided to donate it. I do not mind wearing clothing that is old, if it is well made and I like it. I have plenty that is from the 80's and 90's. One jacket from mid-60's.
 
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