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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Matt,

Just a couple of questions:

1) If the wool fabric for both the jacket and pants have some noticeable texture, but the texture is about the same, would it be okay to wear a jacket and pants that are not the same color?

2) If the wool fabric for the jacket has a fine texture, noticeably not smooth, and the pants have a noticeably coarser texture, would it be okay if the jacket and pants are different colors? If so, would it still be okay if the jacket had the coarser texture, and the pants had the finer texture?

Thanks very much,

Chris
 

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Matt,

Just a couple of questions:

1) If the wool fabric for both the jacket and pants have some noticeable texture, but the texture is about the same, would it be okay to wear a jacket and pants that are not the same color?

2) If the wool fabric for the jacket has a fine texture, noticeably not smooth, and the pants have a noticeably coarser texture, would it be okay if the jacket and pants are different colors? If so, would it still be okay if the jacket had the coarser texture, and the pants had the finer texture?

Thanks very much,

Chris
Insufficient information. Without pictures, it's really impossible to answer either question. The object is to provide an harmonious contrast. This can be done in different ways using color, tone and texture. The answer to either question might be yes or no dependent upon variables not known

The process is:

A) Look at out outfit.
B) Looks good? = You're good to go! :happy:

C) Looks bad? = Shot down in flames! :(

 

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Matt,

Just a couple of questions:

1) If the wool fabric for both the jacket and pants have some noticeable texture, but the texture is about the same, would it be okay to wear a jacket and pants that are not the same color?

2) If the wool fabric for the jacket has a fine texture, noticeably not smooth, and the pants have a noticeably coarser texture, would it be okay if the jacket and pants are different colors? If so, would it still be okay if the jacket had the coarser texture, and the pants had the finer texture?

Thanks very much,

Chris
1) You generally want different textures for the jacket and for the trousers. They can be similar but they should not be the same.

2) Contrasting textures and contrasting colours is what you should always aim for, but the jacket and trousers should be of similar weight. It doesn't matter if the more pronounced texture is on top or on bottom. You can have a subtly ribbed serge blazer with fuzzy flannel trousers, or you have have a coarse tweed jacket with smoothly ribbed cavalry twill trousers. In neither case are the smoother textures completely smooth. Smooth fabrics are for suits, unless they have a bold pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Let's say a particular man has a lot of very well-tailored cotton twill dress pants that he wears regularly with dress shirts. Now, this man would like to begin putting on a sports jacket. Would these be the two rules to follow?

1) Make sure the sports jacket is made from lightweight or medium weight fabric. A heavyweight fabric would not match the lighter weight of the cotton twill pants.

2) Choose any type of fabric. You can choose cotton, wool, a wool blend, or linen. But make sure the fabric for the sports jacket has some noticeable texture.
 

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Let's say a particular man has a lot of very well-tailored cotton twill dress pants that he wears regularly with dress shirts. Now, this man would like to begin putting on a sports jacket. Would these be the two rules to follow?

1) Make sure the sports jacket is made from lightweight or medium weight fabric. A heavyweight fabric would not match the lighter weight of the cotton twill pants.

2) Choose any type of fabric. You can choose cotton, wool, a wool blend, or linen. But make sure the fabric for the sports jacket has some noticeable texture.
They're not rules, though they may serve as useful guidelines. There's really no substitute for developing an eye so that you can discern by looking at it what does, or doesn't, look good. This is commonly the product of trial and error. The problem is that either guideline can be misinterpreted or misapplied, and for each there are exceptions.

It is usually important to pair things with a similar level of formality/dressiness. Doing otherwise generally results in a discordant appearance. You could follow both of your guidelines and still have this problem. Cotton twill pants can have a very informal appearance. A jacket could meet all the criteria in #2, but still present too formal an appearance. Fortunately however, lighter weight textured jackets are often made to look more casual.

If the guidelines you propose allow you to feel more comfortable, they may serve a useful purpose for you.
 
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