Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I was curious as to has how difficult or easy it would be to convert a single breasted jacket ( wide peak lapel )to double breasted jacket ? If it is …... how much larger would the single breasted jacket have to be ??

Thanks as always
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I've done it with an overcoat but not a suit coat. The coat was a 42 and I'm a 40, so I just moved the buttons over and put an extra row of buttons on the side that overlaps. It's serviceable. If you are to try it, the problem you will have is the vents pulling. My guess is that even if you were satisfied with the look, you probably won't be satisfied with the fit. Best bet would probably be just buy a DB coat if that's what you're looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,971 Posts
Even if the jacket is too large and there is extra fabric it is still going to look very queer with all the fabric pulled forward - the seams won't line up and there will be pulling where the arms are placed. Just doesn't seem like its possible while keeping the other proportions correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
The SB jacket would have had to be very wide in the torso indeed to allow for the extra fabric required in a DB. It's like asking whether you could convert a coupe into a four-door saloon.
These days conversions of autos much easier accomplished as witnessed by the many TV custom auto programs available. A 2 door,----Chop, add metal, stretch, add doors etc., weld and shape and voila, a 4 door/ 6 door/ 8 door salooooon. Jacket conversion, nah, unless, you have all the extra fabric that matches the original and then do a chop shop conversion, why bother, you can go to your local dealer and buy the 4 door, less expensive in the long run.

To the OP, Take the advise of well intended members and buy a proper DB jacket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
Even if the jacket is too large and there is extra fabric it is still going to look very queer with all the fabric pulled forward - the seams won't line up and there will be pulling where the arms are placed. Just doesn't seem like its possible while keeping the other proportions correct.
Not to be snide, but isn't the Q word one of the LGBT equivalents of the N word? If so, words such as odd, strange or weird (maybe even terribly disproportionate) might be a better choice of a word than the Q word.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
Not to be snide, but isn't the Q word one of the LGBT equivalents of the N word? If so, words such as odd, strange or weird (maybe even terribly disproportionate) might be a better choice of a word than the Q word.
I'll wait for JBierly's response to this if he chooses to do so. I won't speak for him. Does the slang "whoa", to reign in, to stop, halt might be apropos to your post. I doubt JB's post even approached what you imply by a far stretch when discussing clothing. The term has had , still has far greater meaning until recently when the PC police have taken to monitor speech. Then you attach another incendiary connotation into mix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,534 Posts
Not to be snide, but isn't the Q word one of the LGBT equivalents of the N word? If so, words such as odd, strange or weird (maybe even terribly disproportionate) might be a better choice of a word than the Q word.
In the way used here it is old-fashioned but I don't believe it's offensive since it's not implying anything related to a person's sexuality. It's all context. But I can't tell you to not be offended if you were by this usage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,971 Posts
I certainly wasn't implying anything regarding sexuality. I think most of us know what the word queer means in the context of something odd, unusual, out of place, etc...

Moreover, even in the context of sexuality the word queer doesn't exclusively have a pejorative connotation as suggested and has been embraced in academics as "queer studies" and "queer theory." Even the gay advocacy group in 1990 called themselves Queer Nation. In any event, for those offended by my use of the word queer in the context of an extremely ill-fitting, poorly tailored half assed redone queer looking single breasted turned into double breasted jacket I apologize and I will never use the word again under any context in this forum - but I assure you I am not going to start calling it the "q - word."
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
^^Well said, Sir!
How sad. A member initiates a thinly veiled effort at trolling the membership with a query about the advisability of attempting an unlikely and surely unwise alteration of an existing garment to a different style and another member responds with a logical and very appropriate assessment of said proposal. A third member thinks it cute to take a single word out of context, questioning the use of the word queer to describe the viability of the suggested alteration and then a half dozen postings quibble over the use of the word in question. Frankly, I find it queer ("odd, unusual, out of place")that we would waste so much effort on a 'fool's errand!' Gentlemen, I hope we are better than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,131 Posts
eagle2250

With all due respect and appreciation of your post. I count 4 posts addressing this including yours, minor quibble. We all have our differences and opinions and at times vigorously defend them and some good nature humor thrown into the mix. Perhaps all or many of us at times being the subject of some jibes.
However, I will stand by my post attempting to stem unwarranted flame throwing at a member, or should we just stand by sheepishly. I commend JB's response.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
^^Alas, math was never my strong suit in school:oops:...sorry about that! As for your "standing by your post attempting to stem unwarranted flame throwing at a member," I greatly respect that. Perhaps I should have been more specific with the criticism(s) in my earlier post. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I’ve done this. Three factors that will eliminate nearly every opportunity for you to do it as well:
1. Two full sizes too big, minimum.
2. Peaked lapels. How many suits, really, are there with peaked lapels that aren’t dinner jackets or already double-breasted?
3. You have to be or have a real tailor bring in the shoulders first.

So, if you have a suit that fits these criteria then you can do this, but there is no going back. Step 1 have the shoulders split and brought in. That’s what my tailor calls it, he pins both right smack in the middle, right through the padding, it looks horrific. I don’t much know nor will ever know what he does, he barely speaks English. But the jacket shoulders are perfect and there is no seam that I can find.
Step 2, get a full button set for a double breasted suit coat, seven big and six or eight little for the sleeves. Cut off all the old buttons, fit the jacket and chalk it up. Make a button-hole on the right side where the top button (assuming your project started as a two button coat) was. Install the left inside button, mark and install the rest of the buttons. Note the top two buttons, neither are functional, are traditionally installed a bit wider than the four other front buttons to accentuate the male V shape.
Step 3, close up the vent or vents in the back. A double breasted suit is the most formal if suits, right behind the Tux and tie and tails, so it should have no vents. Two vents are for horseback riding, one is for daily use suits so you can get to your pants pockets, no vents is formal, ostensibly you would never need to access your pants pockets when in a formal double-breasted business suit.

Have at it my friends, I assure you this process when done well will not make your final product look queer, however, it is NOT for the niggardly, as it can be quite pricey.

Did I cover all the bases?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,971 Posts
I've done this. Three factors that will eliminate nearly every opportunity for you to do it as well:
1. Two full sizes too big, minimum.
2. Peaked lapels. How many suits, really, are there with peaked lapels that aren't dinner jackets or already double-breasted?
3. You have to be or have a real tailor bring in the shoulders first.

So, if you have a suit that fits these criteria then you can do this, but there is no going back. Step 1 have the shoulders split and brought in. That's what my tailor calls it, he pins both right smack in the middle, right through the padding, it looks horrific. I don't much know nor will ever know what he does, he barely speaks English. But the jacket shoulders are perfect and there is no seam that I can find.
Step 2, get a full button set for a double breasted suit coat, seven big and six or eight little for the sleeves. Cut off all the old buttons, fit the jacket and chalk it up. Make a button-hole on the right side where the top button (assuming your project started as a two button coat) was. Install the left inside button, mark and install the rest of the buttons. Note the top two buttons, neither are functional, are traditionally installed a bit wider than the four other front buttons to accentuate the male V shape.
Step 3, close up the vent or vents in the back. A double breasted suit is the most formal if suits, right behind the Tux and tie and tails, so it should have no vents. Two vents are for horseback riding, one is for daily use suits so you can get to your pants pockets, no vents is formal, ostensibly you would never need to access your pants pockets when in a formal double-breasted business suit.

Have at it my friends, I assure you this process when done well will not make your final product look queer, however, it is NOT for the niggardly, as it can be quite pricey.

Did I cover all the bases?
I might quibble about closing the vents as well as two vents for horseback riding versus one. Nice first post and welcome to the forum - LOL on the last statement.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
Wouldn't it make more sense to just go to your preferred men's store and buy a double breasted suit? Why go to all that trouble outlined in post #17? In any event let me echo JBierly's welcome to the forum, member cutsh! :happy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,534 Posts
I might quibble about closing the vents as well as two vents for horseback riding versus one. Nice first post and welcome to the forum - LOL on the last statement.
I agree with this. I tend to think of one vent as a horseback style rather than two, which is more formal and the standard for double-breasted suits. But if that jacket has a single vent it best be closed on a double-breasted jacket.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top