Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am very pleased by my recent acquisition of S&H's Boston model. If I were to classify my feelings as meets, exceeds or doesn't meet my expectations, they unmistakably exceed my expectations.

My need was for a rugged all-weather shoe that would provide sure footing for weather that includes ice and slush, but that were still dressy enough to be worn with tweed jackets, flannel slacks, corduroys and other traditional country wear. The other shoes I considered were all Alden models; they included both versions of Alden's All Weather shoes, and both the Moc Toe and Plain Toe bluchers with lug rubber soles. In the end I chose the Boston for its simplicity of design, its color, the aggressive sole and my high regard for the quality of better North Hampton shoes.

The photo on the web page of S&H's U.S. website gave me a general idea of the appearance of the shoe.

https://www.shipton-usa.com/boston-brown-723-0.html

But the photo on the web page does not do justice to the shoe. In the flesh, they are at least twice as handsome as they appear in the photo, which is the opposite of most of my experiences.

The leather is a rich medium brown, darker than colors sometimes called caramel. It leans more toward the reddish spectrum than the yellow. There are slight variations in the color that resemble an acquired patina. It has a smooth grain with tight small pores. When buffed with a horsehair brush, the shoes have a satin luster. They do not appear waxy or sticky, which was a concern of mine from the photo. The description does not say they are calfskin. But the hide is as thin and supple as many so described. So if not calfskin, they are from a very young cow. I don't think they are split cowhide, though I don't know that I could tell for certain.

The leather has been described as essentially waterproof. The name Weather Tuff is used, and it is described as a wax hide with "oils." A Google search of Weather Tuff yields an evidently proprietary process by a U.S. tannery named Prime Tanning that makes various leathers waterproof.

https://www.primetanning.com/products.html

With the above confusion regarding nomenclature, I do not know for certain if they are the source for the hide, but it may be likely.

The shoes are made by Alfred Sargent. There was a delay in obtaining the shoes due to S&H being out of stock, and I was told by S&H that Sargent had a delay in obtaining the leather to complete the order. S&H sorted all of this out, and provided me with generous extras to compensate for my extended wait. I am a satisfied customer.

This may be my first pair of AS shoes, and they suit me well. I am well aware that AS is not EG, G&G or C&J, but they are very well made shoes. I certainly won't deride Alden, but I consider these at least as well made. All of the materials and construction appear top-notch. They have a high quality all leather lining in tan and an equally high quality leather insole and heel pad. The leathering lining is thin and supple, the insole is robust. All the stitching of the uppers is closely spaced, all of the seams are straight where they're supposed to be. The shoes are precisely built. They have a Goodyear storm welt and a very robust cleated rubber sole. The cleats, or lugs if you prefer, are each about 5/16" and there is an additional 3/8" of rubber before you get to the welt. Including the insole, you will stand about an 1½" taller at the heel than God made you.

I normally wear an American size 11D, or less commonly, E. S&H interpolated that to a UK size 10 in this shoe. The letters EX appear immediately after the numeral 10, I don't have any idea if that might indicate anything else regarding sizing, but they fit perfectly and will accommodate heavier socks. While the design is simple, and not overly rustic, the sizing and last are particularly well suited to a country shoe. The toe box is ample, fairly broad and high. There's plenty of room across the ball of the foot, and the heel is a bit narrower in proportion. (For me this is an advantage compared to many Alden shoes I've seen.) The instep of the blucher is cut high, as are mine. And the edges where the shoes lace close to within perhaps 3/8" and remain precisely parallel to one another.

While I am very pleased that these shoes seem to provide all I was looking for, I think they might be a mistake for someone who was not seeking the same qualities. They are a moderately robust country shoe with a thick, heavy cleated rubber sole intended for truly bad footing. They are not built with the splendid lightness or sublime materials of an EG or G&G. They would be out of place, IMO, under a worsted suit. But for what they are, they're a fine, honest English shoe and a worthy alternative to the other models I mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Thanks for taking the time to write up the review. I've looked at S&H's shoes in the past and have seen a pair or two that I wouldn't mind owning. I need to wear somewhat rugged shoes for my job, so I'll keep these in mind the next time I'm shopping.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for taking the time to write up the review. I've looked at S&H's shoes in the past and have seen a pair or two that I wouldn't mind owning. I need to wear somewhat rugged shoes for my job, so I'll keep these in mind the next time I'm shopping.
You're welcome! Glad my thoughts might be of use.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top