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In the former Habsburg empire they call a Nowegian welt “Goiserer” (comes up with Vass shoes and with fritzl’s postings frequently).

“Goiserer” named after the town of Bad Goisern in Austria, is exactly the same thing as Norwegian construction: distinguishing feature is the L-shaped welt stitched on the outside of the shoe and not flat underneath as in standard welt construction.

P.S. I have no idea, who was the first to invent this method , Norway or Austria.
 

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I'm not sure that there is one "classic moccasin construction" method, as the term "moccasin" is applied to a large number of different forms.
There is a thing like "Classic Moccasin Construction".

A classic moccasin of native Americans has one layer of leather, forming the sole and the sides. On top comes the apron and a structural seam connects lower with upper section. Compared to a conventional shoe it is like a 'Tarte Tartin' (upside-down cake). Normally the structural seam is the one that joins upper and sole and is at the bottom, in a moccasin it's on top.

Moccasins without an additional sole are only useful as slippers round the house. The simplest way to add an outer sole lay the sole/side piece on top of the additional sole and stitch both pieces together, while still flat. Then lay the last on top. Pull the sides up over the last, lay on the apron on and hand-stitch on the last. Characteristics of true moccasin construction is the leather going all the way underneath the foot.

All the classic Bass, Sebago, etc are true moccasin construction. Check it, they are usually unlined, the leather that forms the sides run all the way under the foot. But Alden's "Leisure Hand-sewn" is not a classic moccasin. It is a conventional welted shoe and the seam on top forms no functional purpose and is solely decorative.
 

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"Littleway" is the English name for what is known elsewhere as "Blake". There might be minute differences between the two methods,
but nothing major. Both methods have a row of stitching, inside the shoe, running around the insole

Church's does (or at least used to) offer a few styles (with thin soles) in "Littlewood construction".
 

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Goodyear welted shoes confuse me a bit. On some of my goodyear welted shoes I see a row of stitching around the edge of the sole, while others have a clean sole with no stitching visible. Can someone explain how the outer sole is attached in this case?
Here is a photograph of the production process for channelled soles:



https://www.carminashoemaker.com/
 
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