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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. Does anyone else have difficulty obtaining a
deep shine on their black AE shoes?
I particularly cannot get my black calf Graysons to
get much more than a lack-luster shine at best.

I have read numerous posts on here regarding the proper
method of shoe shining, however, nothing seems to work
on these black Graysons.
 

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Hello. Does anyone else have difficulty obtaining a
deep shine on their black AE shoes?
I particularly cannot get my black calf Graysons to
get much more than a lack-luster shine at best.

I have read numerous posts on here regarding the proper
method of shoe shining, however, nothing seems to work
on these black Graysons.
The gentleman who runs the shoe shine stand at the Nordstrom at Phipps Plaza can make my AE Park Avenues shine like patent leather. But it doesn't last.

His explanation was that it requires frequent polishing, over time, to build that kind of shine in this leather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply.

I have a 2 year-old pair of black J&M Meltons which, frankly, shine
up better and will hold a polished shine for two weeks.
There are times when I will put on the J&M's and leave
the Park Avenues in the closet, even though I know the
Park Avenue is a much better shoe.
 

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Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
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I've shined my AE, black calf, Park Aves the same way I shined my military bluchers in the past and while I won't claim they look just like patent leather, you can literally see yourself in the shine...not a bad shine, not bad at all! It just takes time and a whole lot of effort. ;)
 

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I've started using some shoe cream that's available up here (Moneysworth & Best) that has almost no smell (i.e. minimal obnoxious chemicals), softens leather nicely, and puts a great shine on even pebblegrain leathers. I just rub it in carefully and then do a quick, vigorous buff, and my shoes are shiny. It takes me about 10 minutes to do one pair of shoes and I've been getting compliments from everyone about the shine (no kidding, I never got compliments in the past). I could probably do a pair in 5 minutes if I had to. It's worth searching for some good shoe cream; that, I think, is the real key here rather than hours spent spit-polishing, which I could never get to work despite spending hours doing it in the past.
 

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Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
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^^It takes a bit of effort to build your base coat but, after that, maintaining a spit-shine is not nearly as time consuming. Besides, the activity can have a very calming effect on one's psyche! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've started using some shoe cream that's available up here (Moneysworth & Best) that has almost no smell (i.e. minimal obnoxious chemicals), softens leather nicely, and puts a great shine on even pebblegrain leathers. I just rub it in carefully and then do a quick, vigorous buff, and my shoes are shiny. It takes me about 10 minutes to do one pair of shoes and I've been getting compliments from everyone about the shine (no kidding, I never got compliments in the past). I could probably do a pair in 5 minutes if I had to. It's worth searching for some good shoe cream; that, I think, is the real key here rather than hours spent spit-polishing, which I could never get to work despite spending hours doing it in the past.
Doctor Damage:
I checked on this product. It looks like it is sold all over North America
and Canada. Which product are you using? I see they have a
"Professional Polish" and a "Cream Polish," which are side by side
on their website.
 
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