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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Images of combinations of shirt cloth and coordinated ties exist. I recall seeing some with a shirt or two and a two or three ties, if memory serves. Also, I recall a wheel of shirt fabrics and tie fabrics.

I'm pretty sure I saw the images listed above here at AAAC, since I don't frequent other clothes sites.

Can anyone direct me to an image that has two suits, three shirts and four or five ties, all of which are claimed to combine well?

Or that wheel, it may have had suit fabrics at the center of the wheel.

I'm more interested in how they laid out the jackets, shirts, and ties than whether they actually combined well.
 

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That reminds me of a tie I once had that had on the label recommended pairings. It was a dark green and brown repp with the wider stripes separated by blue lines. I usually wore it with a blue OCBD and a dark brown broken bone.
 

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Thank you Flanderian!
Those are they most helpful images I have ever seen. Color, pattern and texture! I'm using the nice color printer at work to print and bind them.
This is being discussed in another thread somewhere so I don't want to over do it but,
I hate the color wheels that people normally show when they try to explain color coordination. They are too loud and the descriptions are too verbose. That one paragraph explained it perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
From the ones with circles representing hose, shoes, and the rest, I didn't know light shoes were so common with darker clothes at one time.

From the color wheels, what a diverse collection of shirt fabrics, and all relatively dark compared to what we would see with suits today (well, except for those wearing the very dark or black shirts with ties today). Also, I'm not sure all of those combinations of shirt pattern and ties would meet the scale test. These images are a wonderful food for thought.

Flanderian, were those wheels produced with additional prescriptions of matching particular wheels with the wearers characteristics? For example, this wheel more likely with red heads with light skin and freckled complexion and that wheel more likely with dark haired, dark eyed, olive complexioned wearers? Or were they exclusively about the clothes?

By the way, I would have replied sooner, but every time I try to do anything on the site today, my cursor, apparently with a mind of it's own, strays to those youkime ads. Perhaps it is the combination of clothing with complexion and hair color.
 

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Thank you Flanderian!
Those are they most helpful images I have ever seen. Color, pattern and texture! I'm using the nice color printer at work to print and bind them.

This is being discussed in another thread somewhere so I don't want to over do it but,
I hate the color wheels that people normally show when they try to explain color coordination. They are too loud and the descriptions are too verbose. That one paragraph explained it perfectly.
I'm glad you find them interesting. I have over 4,000 images in my directory, but unfortunately, it is not searchable. This is just a potpourri I pulled out by quickly going through them. Most were originally published in Apparel Arts magazine. I find them interesting and enjoyable also, but add the caveat that there are among them some recommended pairing I wouldn't wear on a bet. And I've notice, that a lot of '30's ties were quite unrefined in design and coloration, and I don't care for the.

Yes. Thank you Cosmotoast that chart is very helpful.

Thank you Flanderian, your ability and willingness to provide us with resources and knowledge continue to amaze.
You are very welcome, Sir!

From the ones with circles representing hose, shoes, and the rest, I didn't know light shoes were so common with darker clothes at one time.

From the color wheels, what a diverse collection of shirt fabrics, and all relatively dark compared to what we would see with suits today (well, except for those wearing the very dark or black shirts with ties today). Also, I'm not sure all of those combinations of shirt pattern and ties would meet the scale test. These images are a wonderful food for thought.

Flanderian, were those wheels produced with additional prescriptions of matching particular wheels with the wearers characteristics? For example, this wheel more likely with red heads with light skin and freckled complexion and that wheel more likely with dark haired, dark eyed, olive complexioned wearers? Or were they exclusively about the clothes?

By the way, I would have replied sooner, but every time I try to do anything on the site today, my cursor, apparently with a mind of it's own, strays to those youkime ads. Perhaps it is the combination of clothing with complexion and hair color.
I have the feeling that a lot of these pairings were conceived by Arnie Gingrich the long time editor of both Apparel Arts (A forerunner to the original trade GQ) and Esquire. Though obviously, the illustrations are the result of the various illustrators they contracted to, and they too may have influenced the pairings.

There were both illustrations and articles published in both magazines which dealt with selecting clothing colors flattering to your coloring, though I don't recall it being in the form of a wheel. While there are certainly colors that are innately more or less flattering, I'm somewhat ambivalent about the whole topic. As you likely know, there are so-called experts who have created not only system's, but veritable industries on color pairing. One such is the book Color for Men, by Carole Jackson. It isn't bad, and if you don't have it you will likely find it interesting. The problems I have with it are the same problems I have with all such systems; it claims to be an absolute authority on an issue which often has undefinable variables. And while it does not, and can not, account for these, it nonetheless creates complexity for complexity's sake. (Heck, you've gotta have something to sell!) I.e., I don't feel she's commonly mistaken, but the subject isn't as cut and dried as presented.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0345345460/ref=olp_page_1?ie=UTF8&f_all=true

I only have these images as random images in my directories, but I will try to go through them again, and pull out those which I feel might touch upon this topic. But I have to tell you, they often disagree among themselves, and are commonly mistaken.

I've found the best way to learn what colors work best for you, is simply to go to a good store, walk around it and hold items up to skin, and/or, face.
 
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