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Discussion Starter · #407 · (Edited)
Nice boots and a belt to match, not badly priced at $460 for both. The grained leather does appeal to me and from the video it does appear that the boots are well made. If I were a few years younger, I just might buy a pair?. LOL, ;)
Well, SORRY, but you're just not going to get any younger!

Joint Hand Arm Muscle Human body


So you better buy them now, before it gets too late! ;)

(Young whippersnappers! :mad:)
 

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Interesting information, insofar as I could make out what was being conveyed.

Something I really don't understand about the production of this and many other short videos: Why is there a need for the continuous and often loud or intrusive music that accompanies the voice that provides information? If anything, the music interferes with the clarity and audibility of what is being said. This is especially evident in a video like this one where the speaker has a relatively pronounced accent, is speaking quite fast in a low voice, and is providing a fair bit of information in a short period of time along with the visuals. The music adds nothing at all to the information provided. In fact, it interferes with the perception of what is being provided.

The indiscriminate use of music in all sorts of situations -- social, educational, even interpersonal -- appears to be something we have slid into automatically as a society over the decades. Perhaps it started out as an attempt to seem sophisticated or to provide some sort of atmosphere or ambiance which conveyed elegance. I frequently hear loud music, often dictated by some person's individual taste, in restaurants, shops, gyms, and all sorts of other places that are public or semi-public. It leads me to suspect that one of the most valuable qualities of our lives, the presence of silence, is so undervalued that people feel a compulsive need to fill that silence with music (or often what seems to be a kind of organized cacophony).

I love music, but I much prefer to listen to my own selections of it with undivided attention, not as an afterthought dictated by someone else's taste, or as an unwanted background to something else I am doing with concentration or attention. I've studied attention in the laboratory as a cognitive psychologist for close to forty years, and I can assure you that attention to multiple sources is never 100% effective. There is no such thng as 100% effective dual-tasking, let alone multi-tasking, where one or more tasks do not suffer a performance deficit. Why not give music its due, and other tasks you are performing their due?
 
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