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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Out of curiosity, do you think you would have elicited the same comments had you eschewed the contrasting vests and merely been wearing a conventional two-piece business suit?
Well, I don't know. Today I didn't have on a vest when the subject comments were made as I was wearing a double-breasted suit from Burberry's. But, virtually all of my single-breasted tweed and other wool suits have contrasting vests and if I have a look, I suppose that's it.

Maybe I should also mention that when I do see others around here in coats and ties I rarely see them also wearing overcoats on cold days, raincoats when it rains or hats or boots on either occasion. I do wear fedoras and homburgs, overcoats, raincoats and protective footwear when appropriate. Perhaps that all combines to appear over dressed to some. I suppose your guess is as good as mine...

Hans
 

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I was just at work and wearing a suit like I do every day. I tend to agree with those who suspect that the issue is not so much that I am overdressed as it is so many others are underdressed.

Hans
Doesn't sound like you were overdressed to me.
 

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Apparently so, but then this is rural Indiana. Not that I see many others (outside of my firm's offices) wearing suits, but perhaps what I routinely wear that is bit different are suits with contrasting vests such as a black or navy suit with a grey vest. My Norwegian wife calls it the 1930's diplomat look. As simple as that is, it seems to be a look people around here associate with wealth and the upper classes. It's fine with me for them to think whatever they wish. I rather doubt I'll ever think of being accused of overdressing as anything but a compliment...

Hans
Ah, ha! No more half measures vonSuess! Need to go full Stresemann! Appurtenances to be found lower left -

 

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Well, the Japanese word does come from the Latin for time, via Portuguese.
Interesting language; I recently learned that during the Taisho Era, a women's movement emerged during which young women became more westernized as typified by the concept of the "modern girl." This term was then evidently incorporated into Japanese as Modan Garu.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Should a woman tell you that you are 'ridiculously overdressed' you have every right to tell Human Resources that you feel that you are in a hostile environment and demand redress. Let the doxy stew in her own juices for a while!
Well, she's not in my organisation so it's not like she's anyone I have to work with. There is still a firm here in a space they leased before I bought the building and that's where she works - as an accountant, I believe. I suppose that's part of the issue as they don't dress up as much as we do. That could change as they have recently inquired about becoming part of my firm instead of moving out when their lease is up in a few months. Could be cultural differences to address...

Hans
 

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Interesting language; I recently learned that during the Taisho Era, a women's movement emerged during which young women became more westernized as typified by the concept of the "modern girl." This term was then evidently incorporated into Japanese as Modan Garu.
The story goes that Japanese suffered from a linguistic bottleneck - that is, the founding group of people from whence Japanese originally arose was small and hence the "authentic Japanese" vocabulary is itself small. Consequently importing words from foreign languages is both necessary and unremarkable.

The results nonetheless amuse - e.g., "sarariman" = "salaryman" or white-collar worker; "esukareta" = "escalator", etc. There was a London Japanese newssheet called the "London Dayori" - "dayori" being the transliteration into English of the transliteration into Japanese of the word "diary". When I worked in Tokyo for a couple of months in 1987, my regular order at the local coffee shop was "espressu larju tekato" with a shot of "miruku". And years later, I heard a women at the next table asking the waiter for an "apuru jusu".

Finally, "karaoke" has two phonemes, "kara-" meaning "empty" as in "karate" - "empty hand", and "-oke" from...orchestra.
 

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The story goes that Japanese suffered from a linguistic bottleneck - that is, the founding group of people from whence Japanese originally arose was small and hence the "authentic Japanese" vocabulary is itself small. Consequently importing words from foreign languages is both necessary and unremarkable.

The results nonetheless amuse - e.g., "sarariman" = "salaryman" or white-collar worker; "esukareta" = "escalator", etc. There was a London Japanese newssheet called the "London Dayori" - "dayori" being the transliteration into English of the transliteration into Japanese of the word "diary". When I worked in Tokyo for a couple of months in 1987, my regular order at the local coffee shop was "espressu larju tekato" with a shot of "miruku". And years later, I heard a women at the next table asking the waiter for an "apuru jusu".

Finally, "karaoke" has two phonemes, "kara-" meaning "empty" as in "karate" - "empty hand", and "-oke" from...orchestra.
Please tell me this post is true, so I can fall over in laughter. Sarariman? I'm going to hell for my amusement at that one.
 

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The story goes that Japanese suffered from a linguistic bottleneck - that is, the founding group of people from whence Japanese originally arose was small and hence the "authentic Japanese" vocabulary is itself small. Consequently importing words from foreign languages is both necessary and unremarkable.

The results nonetheless amuse - e.g., "sarariman" = "salaryman" or white-collar worker; "esukareta" = "escalator", etc. There was a London Japanese newssheet called the "London Dayori" - "dayori" being the transliteration into English of the transliteration into Japanese of the word "diary". When I worked in Tokyo for a couple of months in 1987, my regular order at the local coffee shop was "espressu larju tekato" with a shot of "miruku". And years later, I heard a women at the next table asking the waiter for an "apuru jusu".

Finally, "karaoke" has two phonemes, "kara-" meaning "empty" as in "karate" - "empty hand", and "-oke" from...orchestra.
Thank you! I find that fascinating. I've always had an interest in etymology, as I've enjoyed language. And I also enjoy history, and etymology is combination of both. I've long heard language described as the repository of culture, sometimes rising to even being culture, and etymology is a key to unlocking an understanding of the mind behind it.
 

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The story goes that Japanese suffered from a linguistic bottleneck - that is, the founding group of people from whence Japanese originally arose was small and hence the "authentic Japanese" vocabulary is itself small. Consequently importing words from foreign languages is both necessary and unremarkable.

The results nonetheless amuse - e.g., "sarariman" = "salaryman" or white-collar worker; "esukareta" = "escalator", etc. There was a London Japanese newssheet called the "London Dayori" - "dayori" being the transliteration into English of the transliteration into Japanese of the word "diary". When I worked in Tokyo for a couple of months in 1987, my regular order at the local coffee shop was "espressu larju tekato" with a shot of "miruku". And years later, I heard a women at the next table asking the waiter for an "apuru jusu".

Finally, "karaoke" has two phonemes, "kara-" meaning "empty" as in "karate" - "empty hand", and "-oke" from...orchestra.
It has been described in literature that Japanese does not invent anything. They copy and improve upon existing stuff, and that includes languages. They first copy and write in Chinese text, then they *invented* kitakana and hirakana. When they get new words from other language, they just tried to pronounce it with their accent and written down using katakana. That is probably not that different for an English speaking person trying to understand foreign item.

So if I got it right, your regular order is Espresso large decaf with a shot of milk, while the lady ordered Apple juice.

Oh, BTW, Tempura is originated from Portuguese according to Wiki. Tempora, I think that is from Latin.

Please tell me this post is true, so I can fall over in laughter. Sarariman? I'm going to hell for my amusement at that one.
Here comes another one: OL stands for Office Lady. This encompasses all the female who work in an office building.
 
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