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I have learned that some bbq competition-level cooks will, at times, do some of their ribs when they cook at home in the oven, either after an hour of smoke or the whole way. I have a friend who gave me some rub and told me to baste the ribs with dijon mustard and sprinkle the rub really well over both sides of the ribs. Wrap in foil and refrigerate at least two hours. Heat oven to 250 degrees and put the ribs in the foil, upside down, on a baking sheet. Cook two hours. Open up the ribs, leaving foil peeled back. Ribs now face up. Raise the heat to 300. You can redo the rub and heat for 30 minutes or you can slather bbq sauce liberally over them and heat 30 minutes. Then it is 350 for 30 minutes. You can reapply sauce for this last 30 minutes or more rub, and then if you go rub, someone said a light schmear of honey over the ribs the last 10 minutes.

No one has complained about them, and they taste better than the Chilis or TGI Fridays version, though those places, having wood stoves, can get a nice little char on them.
 

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Pork ribs in honey are my favorite, by this recipe dish is getting ready quickly, I learned about it when I was a college student. You should prepare them if you like honey and do not have allergies to it. By the way, I'm very fond of cooking and have a blog. Here is this recipe in short essay, so, you will need half a kilogram of ribs, tkemali, ketchup spices, and salt. From spices, I suggest, take simply black pepper and paprika. So, thoroughly washed ribs should dry a little, or pat them with a napkin so that there is no moisture on the surface. Now we rub the meat with spices, salt, and then with sauce. The latter is prepared from tkemali, honey, and ketchup. If you need to cook everything quickly, spices and salt can be added directly to the sauce. Put the ribs laid on the baking sheet in the oven and leave for 30-35 minutes. We prepare the preparation at 180-200 ° C.
 

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I have a Big Green Egg but I'm not sure that it is necessary to have one to dip your feet in the whole realm of smoking and grilling... Some of the less expensive Weber products are perfectly good. There are differences, but the price of a BGE in large size, with an accompanying range of accessories, and perhaps a table to mount it in, can get expensive for a first-time buyer.

As far as using a conventional oven goes: It's undoubtedly the case that you can make some delicious slow-cook dishes without a charcoal grill set to indirect heat. If you are prepared to use bottles of liquid smoke, as many chefs are, then you can even replicate that smoky tang associated with lumpwood charcoal. Yes it's cheating, and yes there's something slightly gnarly about liquid smoke, but in a blind taste test it would probably fool a lot of people.

The trick with a really long slow cool over charcoal, on a BGE, is avoiding it going out overnight as the temperature drops or bad weather comes in. Usually a bit of experience can prevent this from happening... In cold weather, for example, it's usually better to get the Egg cruising at around 150 degrees rather than something like 125. Making sure the base of the Egg has adequate fuel at the start of the cook is another factor, and then there's some issues around how fine the charcoal is, and how it burns... If it's too ashy then it can cause a problem with air getting through.

I would use an indoor oven to finish off something if the weather got particularly bad, no problem. At the end of the day, if the majority of the cook at the beginning or end is over charcoal then a period in a conventional oven is not such a big deal, except to purists.
 
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