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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any specific brand recommended above all others?

My shirts are some wonderful beauties made by Freddy and some MTM from a Honk Kong outfit with an L.A. outlet

My local supermarket offers Niagra in (original, heavy duty, & light) plus a none aerosol spray version

I do prefer a "stiff" variety for my bespoke shirts with removable collar stays (no fusing on the inside) which tend to not stay straight after mid-day

This could be due to lack of startching on my part (thus I generated this thread) or perhaps I need to iron them better...yet I'm also considering my shirt maker to try a stiffer collar for my next batch of bespoke shirts. The MTM stuff is all fused with built in collar stays, but tend to stay straighter longer (but the fit and construction of the shirts is way inferior to Freddy's masterpieces)

Any recommendations are appreciated
 

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Any specific brand recommended above all others?

My shirts are some wonderful beauties made by Freddy and some MTM from a Honk Kong outfit with an L.A. outlet

My local supermarket offers Niagra in (original, heavy duty, & light) plus a none aerosol spray version

I do prefer a "stiff" variety for my bespoke shirts with removable collar stays (no fusing on the inside) which tend to not stay straight after mid-day

This could be due to lack of startching on my part (thus I generated this thread) or perhaps I need to iron them better...yet I'm also considering my shirt maker to try a stiffer collar for my next batch of bespoke shirts. The MTM stuff is all fused with built in collar stays, but tend to stay straighter longer (but the fit and construction of the shirts is way inferior to Freddy's masterpieces)

Any recommendations are appreciated
I'm not entirely certain from your post what the problem is. Are you saying you don't have a problem with your MTM, but Freddy's shirts wilt? I've never cared for starch, and used it only as a last resort for shirts that weren't made as well as they might be. One thing that might help is a thicker lining if Freddy will agree to use one.

But I've found the key to decent collars and shirts is usually how they're laundered and ironed. Rule number one is to always launder them with a good liquid fabric softener. This makes ironing them both easier and more effective. I prefer tumble drying on a permanent press setting, and assuring the dryer isn't too full, as that leaves the shirts fluffier and less wrinkled. I usually fold them gently and then iron as needed.

Ironing is a skill. I've had the good, or bad fortune, depending on your perspective, to perfect this skill over a 45-year period. Many insist you need to leave the shirt damp to iron it. I've never done that; rather I use a spray bottle to moisten it as I iron. I prefer a steam iron with a burst of steam set on a higher setting. Make sure the panels are as flat as possible and smooth them with your hand as you iron. Iron once, moisten and iron again. You'll get a smooth pucker-free panel. Sleeves first, collar second, then the rest.

To get puckers out of seams, pull one end of the seam as you iron up from the other end, keeping tension on the seam. Again iron once, moisten and iron again. Collars have lots of seams. I iron the back of the collar first to flatten the whole collar, then do the front, ironing and moistening and stretching as much as needed until the whole collar is smooth and flat.

I'm sure others have success with different methods, but I assure you what I've describe also works well. Takes a bit of time, but the results are pretty good.
 

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You shouldn't use any starch as it will shorten the life of your shirt on the collar and and the cuff.
This just ain't so. Or if it is in your case, please explain how and why that happens.
Probably the best (and certainly the cheapest) brand out there is Argo. You find it in the supermarket in the baking goods aisle. It's a powder. Liquify it in a cup of cold water then toss it into a pot of boiling water til it all bubbles. Cool it down and dip your shirts in it. Dry and iron. It'll give you that nice Edwardian look we older tools really enjoy.
 

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Not all older people prefer starch....

I'm older and think starch is an abomination and should never be used. If your shirts are wilting, it is in the manufacturing or the way you wash and iron. My Jewrmyn St shirts from a variety of shirtmakers have never seen starch and have never wilted.
 

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This just ain't so. Or if it is in your case, please explain how and why that happens.
Probably the best (and certainly the cheapest) brand out there is Argo. You find it in the supermarket in the baking goods aisle. It's a powder. Liquify it in a cup of cold water then toss it into a pot of boiling water til it all bubbles. Cool it down and dip your shirts in it. Dry and iron. It'll give you that nice Edwardian look we older tools really enjoy.
Anytime you use chemicals on your clothing this will shorten the useful likfe of that garment. Unless you have a huge wardrobe of shirts, suits, slacks and jackets and can afford to launder or dry clean them the best way to launder a shirt is in cold water, hang dry until slightly damp and then tuble dry on low or permanent press setting until the wrinkles come out and then Iron with steam and a spray bottle of water as described by flanderian. Hot water and starch will ruin and shrink your shirts in all the wrong places.
 

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This just ain't so. Or if it is in your case, please explain how and why that happens.
Probably the best (and certainly the cheapest) brand out there is Argo. You find it in the supermarket in the baking goods aisle. It's a powder. Liquify it in a cup of cold water then toss it into a pot of boiling water til it all bubbles. Cool it down and dip your shirts in it. Dry and iron. It'll give you that nice Edwardian look we older tools really enjoy.
Alexander Kabbaz recommends not using starch on shirts because it damages the fabric and decreases the lifespan of the shirt.

It is extremely unlikely that you know more about shirts than he does.
 

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On my shirts I never use starch. For the reasons as discribed. Collars are a different story. Mine are detachable, and therefore replacable and are the most visible part of my shirt. The collars are starched like cardboard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Went to Freddy yesterday

He rarely uses startch but lets the client decide. He adjusted the angle of the collar stay socket so that the stay remains firmly in. Ironed it and added some startch. The collar came out as I appropriately desired it and will bring my other shirts for the bespoke adjustment (hopefully I won't have to startch in the future and won't have to make new collars)

He made some notes about increasing the area of of the front collar band where the button is located (I forgot the term he used), since I prefer to make big windsor knots which might contribute to the issue which brought me to author this post. Thus he'll design a slightly different collar on my next purchase

So while Freddy made adjustments, I also used the visit as an excuse to buy a pair of shirts & to mentally stick it to Slav2Fashion based on his inappropriate posts on Freddy previously

I'm gonna try a different collar with a stiffer band and adjustments to the collar in order to make it stiffer...without having to resort to startch

He took the time to educate me on the parts of a collar and how he makes them...thus giving me further insight into the bespoke process

Now I'll update you folks in about a week per the new collars, hopefully without having to resort to startch :crazy:
 

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I have one spray bottle with water in it, and one spray bottle of starch which I mix myself from Faultless liquid starch concentrate (starch section at the grocery) plus water.
I like the do-you-own spray, it soaks into the fabric better than regular spraystarch, and doesn't build up on the iron.
 

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This just ain't so. Or if it is in your case, please explain how and why that happens.
Probably the best (and certainly the cheapest) brand out there is Argo. You find it in the supermarket in the baking goods aisle. It's a powder. Liquify it in a cup of cold water then toss it into a pot of boiling water til it all bubbles. Cool it down and dip your shirts in it. Dry and iron. It'll give you that nice Edwardian look we older tools really enjoy.
I wondered how to do that.
 

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Alexander Kabbaz recommends not using starch on shirts because it damages the fabric and decreases the lifespan of the shirt.

It is extremely unlikely that you know more about shirts than he does.
Why don't you just leave it at Kabbaz recommends, etc. Why try to make it a contest about who knows more about what?
Here's what I know: I've bean wearing starched shirts for close to 50 years. Starch has never damaged nor, to my knowledge, hastened their demise. And I still have a few from when I was 13, which was, as mentioned, 50 years ago.
 

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Anytime you use chemicals on your clothing this will shorten the useful likfe of that garment. Unless you have a huge wardrobe of shirts, suits, slacks and jackets and can afford to launder or dry clean them the best way to launder a shirt is in cold water, hang dry until slightly damp and then tuble dry on low or permanent press setting until the wrinkles come out and then Iron with steam and a spray bottle of water as described by flanderian. Hot water and starch will ruin and shrink your shirts in all the wrong places.
Starch is not a chemical, in the sense that you mean it. It's 100% corn powder and nothing else. It's the same stuff you put in pudding to thicken it. That's why it's sold in the baking goods aisle (see original post).
It can be argued that starch helps your cottons: it forms a barrier that catches neck and cuff oils and washes them away, along with the starch, when the shirt is laundered.

But the primary reason to use starch is to crisp 'er up (board-stiff in my case) so that you walk down the street like Richard Corey and your shirt whistles when you move your arms. Makes you feel smooth, really smooth.
 

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Depending on the amount of starch used will determine the deterioration of the cloth. I have friends that use starch on their shirts and have noticed the cuffs and collars fray. Everyone I have talked to including shirtmakers frown on the repetitive use of starch on shirting. I don't particularly like it but if it works for you and you like a stiff shirt then fine. I personally like a softer shirt that feels cool to the touch.
 
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