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Question about shopping in San Francisco

I'll be in San Francisco for an upcoming seminar and was wondering if there is any shopping of interest within walking distance of the Fisherman's Wharf area? Is the Alden Shop any where nearby?
 

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You might just leave your heart...

Take the Cable Car to Union Square. (gocalifornia.about.com/od/casfmaps/l/bl_sf_map_ccar.htm)

Saks, Nieman Marcus, Brooks Bros, Polo, Wilkes Bashford, the Hound, Alden, etc... all within 2-3 blocks of Union Square.
Union Square has been the shopping center of of SF since at least the end of WW II...I remember going there as a grade-schooler. It's perhaps the last remnant of the San Francisco memorialized by Tony Bennett.

Gustare/enjoy!:icon_smile:

hbs
 

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I was just at CCC in June. As I recall it's a bit of a schlep from Fisherman's Wharf though not too far; should easily be able to take public transit there if the walk is too far. Either way it's a must see if you're in SF.
 

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One bit of warning is not to dally about the Civic Center area at night, and try not to be too suprised by the homeless situation in SF. Homelessness is a worse problem in SF than in any other city in the US I can think of.

Also, be careful when wandering too far from Union Square. Go in the wrong direction and things get dicey very quickly.
 

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Don't walk from FW. It's straight up Hill. You will be exhausted and sweaty. Take the Cable Car as suggested. Go to Saks as well. They carry a few of the Church line. BB is also there as is Ralph Lauren who is having a sale now, Barneys etc.. They are all having sales.
 

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One bit of warning is not to dally about the Civic Center area at night, and try not to be too suprised by the homeless situation in SF. Homelessness is a worse problem in SF than in any other city in the US I can think of.

Also, be careful when wandering too far from Union Square. Go in the wrong direction and things get dicey very quickly.
Homelessness, squalor and crime are the marks of "progressive" cities across the country. I would say Berkeley is probably still worse than SF, although I'll admit I haven't been to either for a while (although used to live in Berkeley).

Warning, the area along the cable car line between Union Square and Market Street attracts a lot of aggressive bums and derelicts (many pretending to be "veterans") who get drunk and try to harrass tourists out of their money, especially as it starts getting dark.

As a little kid, I remember San Francisco as a city of big Irish cops at every street corner who used to keep everything in line. I used to be in total awe of those policemen, with their dark blue wool uniforms. They were like real superheroes to a little kid. Beautiful city and no crime back then. But times have changed. The place started going to hell in the Sixties.
 

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Homelessness, squalor and crime are the marks of "progressive" cities across the country. Warning, the area along the cable car line between Union Square and Market Street attracts a lot of aggressive bums and derelicts (many pretending to be "veterans") who get drunk and try to harrass tourists out of their money, especially as it starts getting dark.

As a little kid, I remember San Francisco as a city of big Irish cops at every street corner who used to keep everything in line. I used to be in total awe of those policemen, with their dark blue wool uniforms. They were like real superheroes to a little kid. Beautiful city and no crime back then. But times have changed. The place started going to hell in the Sixties.
One thing I can assure you Sir is that there is no shortage of big Irish cops in San Francisco these days. As for the "progressive" comment: I will say that between here and whatever the "non-progressive" places you may have in mind, well, we'll take our "homelessness and squalor" over their politics any day, thank you very much. Point being, San Franciscans, like New Yorkers, (though they may privately agree with much of what you said) don't take very well to outsiders bad-mouthing their city. LA people will let you say whatever you want about the place, but in SF you're cruisin' for a bruisin'.

To get back to the initial post- Union Square is the downtown shopping Mecca, but many of the stores you may be interested in (RL, BB, Jos Banks, The Hound, Cable Car) are more in the Financial District along Post, Sutter and Bush streets. Fortunately, SF is so compact that you can easily walk there from Union Square, or for a more scenic ride, take the F-Market streetcar from the Fisherman's Wharf and get off at about Market and New Montgomery.
 

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Homelessness, squalor and crime are the marks of "progressive" cities across the country. I would say Berkeley is probably still worse than SF, although I'll admit I haven't been to either for a while (although used to live in Berkeley).

Warning, the area along the cable car line between Union Square and Market Street attracts a lot of aggressive bums and derelicts (many pretending to be "veterans") who get drunk and try to harrass tourists out of their money, especially as it starts getting dark.

As a little kid, I remember San Francisco as a city of big Irish cops at every street corner who used to keep everything in line. I used to be in total awe of those policemen, with their dark blue wool uniforms. They were like real superheroes to a little kid. Beautiful city and no crime back then. But times have changed. The place started going to hell in the Sixties.
Leaving the quasi-political commentary aside, I have found that, while the homeless are quite visible in SF, they aren't necessarily more "aggressive" or harassing than in many other large cities. I have spent some time in SF (for business and pleasure), and certainly would not deter anyone from exploring the city on foot or by cable car. It is a great town. In my experience, it is safe to walk around much of the city at night -- although there obviously are areas that should be avoided. Like in any large city, tourists should use common sense.

As others have noted, the main shopping is around Union Square, with some other notable spots more towards the "financial district." I personally have never felt uncomfortable exploring these areas at night and on foot.
 

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...many of the stores you may be interested in (RL, BB, Jos Banks, The Hound, Cable Car) are more in the Financial District along Post, Sutter and Bush streets. Fortunately, SF is so compact that you can easily walk there from Union Square, or for a more scenic ride, take the F-Market streetcar from the Fisherman's Wharf and get off at about Market and New Montgomery.
In the heyday of the early to mid-sixties, the Financial District was as much a TNSIL bastion as Wall Street during the same period...The Rough Rider Sportswear people marketed a wonderful 3/2 sack flannel blazer, available in a rainbow of deep colors (olive, hunter, Burgundy, camel, navy, etc) labeled the Montgomery Streeter after one of the main north/south thoroughfares in the neighborhood.
 

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One of mine and Andy's favorites is The Hound on Sutter new Montgomery, not too far from Union Square either.
Good one obiwan!

Here's some recommendations:

The Hound on Sutter (Walt and Mike, owners) near the Alden Shop
The Alden Shop -- 170 Sutter Street
Cable Car Clothiers (new location 200 Bush St (between Sansome St & Treasury Pl) -- not worth it but you have to visit![
Patrick James, 216 Montgomery St, https://www.patrickjames.com/
Wilkes Bashford (375 Sutter Street)

Have breakfast at Sears. 439 Powell St, North West of Union Sq.
www.searsfinefood.com
 

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Or maybe not. Nice to see them back.
 

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The Hound, the Alden Shop, CCC, and Patrick James are all within a three block radius (where Union Sqaure and the Financial District meet). The Hound and the Alden Shop are definitely closed on Sundays, and I think CCC and Patrick James as well, so something to consider for your schedule. I was in the Alden Shop the other day, and they had the whiskey shell cordovan chukka. Keep your fingers crossed that they have your size. At the Hound, Mike is a great guy and will set you up with something to your liking. CCC currently has 30% off Southwick MTM, but their prices are astronomical to begin with (but you probably already knew that).

The area described as dicey is the Tenderloin, which is directly to the west of Union Square. Honestly, it has cleaned up a lot, so much so that there are more than a few nicer bars and restaurants in that area (people who like to come up with inane nicknames call it the Trendyloin). Some places are still rough, like Jones and Turk, but you would have to travel pretty far from Union Square to get to that point, and you could tell that the scenery was changing. Even the rough patches I don't think of as dangerous, just very sad, with a lot of homeless, drug addicted, and others who have slipped through the cracks. In any case, you would only be going to these areas to get great Pakistani, Thai, or Vietnamese food (Shalimar, Sai Jai Thai, and Tu Lan, respectively).

I'll throw in a couple recommendations for places to grab a drink:

Redwood Room: Hotel bars (and the people who frequent them) are not my cup of tea, but I think this is a beautiful bar.

The Owl Tree: This used to be a fantastic bar, but the owner, Bobby C, passed away recently (RIP). It has been renovated with fancy drinks and a weird mosaic outside, but it is still a good spot by Union Square.

Whiskey Thieves: You can smoke inside and there are a lot of hipsters here, but pretty much the best selection of scotch, whiskey, bourbon, rye in the city. Cheap as chips (relatively speaking) and a generous hand. Cash only.
 

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Good one obiwan!

Here's some recommendations:

The Hound on Sutter (Walt and Mike, owners) near the Alden Shop
The Alden Shop -- 170 Sutter Street
Cable Car Clothiers (new location 200 Bush St (between Sansome St & Treasury Pl) -- not worth it but you have to visit![
Patrick James, 216 Montgomery St, https://www.patrickjames.com/
Wilkes Bashford (375 Sutter Street)

Have breakfast at Sears. 439 Powell St, North West of Union Sq.
www.searsfinefood.com
A very good list I think. There are also the usual suspects such as Brooks Brothers and Jos. A. Bank but The Hound puts them to shame on a regular basis. :icon_smile:

As for Sears Fine Foods, yes it's open. It was closed for a while but was remodeled and re-opened under the management of Lori's Diners. They retained the old charm, much of the menu and much of the old staff. It is still a great place for Swedish pancakes but the crowds can get a little wacky. If the line is out the door it can be a mess to get a seat and served in a short time. If that's the case, mosey on down Powell and go into Kuleto's which has its own entrance next to the Villa Florence hotel. Kuleto's is no longer the place to go for Italian but they still do a great breakfast.

If both are crowded, mosey back up Powell to the Westin St. Francis and head inside to the Oak Room. They do a great breakfast and the ambiance and service are usualy top-notch.
 

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Good one obiwan!

Have breakfast at Sears. 439 Powell St, North West of Union Sq.
[URL="https://www.searsfinefood.com"]www.searsfinefood.com[/URL]
If you don't make it for breakfast it's also a decent place for dinner. By then the crowds Quay mentioned have died down and the place has a nice atmosphere, with the Cable Cars going past the St. Francis outside.

Other places for atmosphere: John's Grill: Sam Spade's favorite, lots of wood paneling and photographs of local politicians on the wall. Also, The Big Four in the Huntington Hotel on Nob Hill. Kind of a 19th century gentleman's club atmosphere, dedicated to the robber-barons of the Gilded Age.

labeled the Montgomery Streeter after one of the main north/south thoroughfares in the neighborhood.
Montgomery was long known as the "Wall Street of the West." Alas, the stock exchange has since closed, but many major corporations and financial institutions are still located along that corridor. Though there's the usual share of "business casual", if you walk along Montgomery during the lunch hour you will see, I think, some of the best dressed office workers on the West Coast.
 
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