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"Inspired by the mass production techniques of industrial societies, pop art deliberately denied the distinctions between high culture and popular culture. Implicitly and explicitly it asserted relativism's principal tenet that all values are equal: The distinction between bad taste and good taste is elitist; all notions of bad and good are merely one class's way of snubbing another." (C. Colson, God and Politics).

When I read this my mind immediately traveled to my generation's ignorance and refusal to dress well.
 

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You may have a point
edited
 

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"Inspired by the mass production techniques of industrial societies, pop art deliberately denied the distinctions between high culture and popular culture. Implicitly and explicitly it asserted relativism's principal tenet that all values are equal: The distinction between bad taste and good taste is elitist; all notions of bad and good are merely one class's way of snubbing another." (C. Colson, God and Politics).

When I read this my mind immediately traveled to my generation's ignorance and refusal to dress well.


The distinction between bad taste and good taste is elitist. Elitism is good.
 

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What's wrong with it? I'm not a big fan of Japanese pop art, but it has its place and his works seem pretty decent. As for his dress sense...
Japanese cartoon art can be cool. Japanese cartoon art with fangs or with really big boobs as Pop Art seems both vapid and unbeautiful.
 

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=

This may be a bit closer to what the OP was talking about. This is a look that Warhol supposedy pioneered: blazer, repp tie, BB OCBD and jeans. The style has a close connection to Warhol's art. It was the form of the thing itself and not its utility or the social meaning, that gave it its beauty. But most specificaly, the thing's ubiquity and recognizability make it all the more beautiful ( I suppose Richard Hamilton's blazer must be entirely different). What would be more ubiquitous than Levi's and the Original Polo Collar shirt. What matter that they don't "go together".

Looks pretty sharp though. It doesn't seem obvious that you could blame him for flip-flops and hoodies.
 

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I think the Warhol look (as posted and described by AP) is brilliant.

For one thing, I really like to wear a tie. But my workplace views them as uptight.

Hmm. Perhaps the jeans provide a useful counterpoint, creating allowance for the tie. The entire look can now be read as more relaxed.

OR maybe the whole thing will come as too ironic, too referential -- what J. Crew, et al., are doing.
 

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With all due respect, I think Mr. Colson goes off the rails after his first sentence because he misses the irony in the art he's referencing. The Pop Artists--Warhol, et. al.--were nothing if not elitist; the work itself was a kind of sophisticated joke: to be irate at its borrowings or apparent laziness was to miss the point, and so was to see it as somehow bringing art to a mass level. It's natural home was the NY art scene of the sixties, which meant money and hip and a rejection of fifties Abstract Expressionist earnestness, not populist leveling. (See Tom Wolfe's The Painted Word for a highly satirical take on this, or George Plympton's Edie to get a feeling for how oppressively self-referential it all was.) After all, people paid lots of money to put a Warhol soup can or Brillo carton on their walls, not the real thing.

There's a weird hall of mirrors effect in looking at Warhol's late sartorial style (earlier on he favored tight jeans, striped t-shirts, vinyl and leather); it's as if he's quoting a style, deliberately moving it into a context (his world of the Factory and Max's Kansas City and the Velvet Underground) where it jarred with expectations. Which is pretty much what he was doing with those soup cans and Brillo boxes.
 

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It's all a convergence. Pop art was an appropriation of the common, while mass reproduction had been working in the opposite direction, making fine art "available" to all.

So, sartorially we've sort of ended up with a choice (for men): square toes and variegated stripe shirts; OR wearing something that appears to many as referential, retro, or ironic.
 

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It's interesting how one small difference can make such a big change. This morning I got a haircut. So that today, in my khakis, blazer, and OCBD, I look (and feel) utterly dull. Too much so.
 
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