Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I'm new here, it's great to join your community.

I'm a young professional(not far out of college) in Washington, DC and I don't own a car, mainly because I don't need to.

However, this has made me realize that my dress shoes, which I wear to work every day, are much more of a functional item in my wardrobe that just a thing of ornamentation.

As such, I've found that I get fairly screwed on rainy days. The bottoms of my shoes become slick (almost dangerously so: I live in the very steeply hilly northern VA... it makes walking home in the rain terrifying), and within minutes of walking on a wet surface, I can feel the water through my socks.

I thought I was a genius by making some waterproof strips of clear packing tape and cutting them to the shape of my inside of my shoes so that I could at least stop worrying about walking around with squishy socks all day. However, they showed me that water also comes into the shoe through the seams where the sole meets the sides of the toe cap...

I know that an easy solution to all this is to wear sneakers to work with my real shoes in my pack, but it's a big city with lovely ladies and I don't exactly want to look like some intern. I do have a decent pair of brown rubber-soled shoes, but it's hard to find rubber-soled dress shoes of decent appearance and quality.

Does anybody else here have experiences like this or perhaps some advice? None of my friends or coworkers seem to have this problem.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Simply purchase some overshoes. Google it and you'll find several brands, Tingley is a favorite around here.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,152 Posts
I once owned a rare british sportscar. It had a massive frame to protect the mechanics. Over this was coachwork to protect me. Over the coachwork was paint to protect against rust. I waxed the paint, put vintage grill guards over the vitange triplex headlamps that protected against darkness. I bought a flannel soft, no scratch car cover and moved a lot of junk out of the garage to park it indoors.
I found the girl I was dating in the back seat of a chevy wagon with american heating and a cassette player. She wasn't alone. There was utterly NO protection for my heart ( or his tyres.)

The fundamental reason for shoes is to protect your feet.
You need to put aside visions of young lovelies swooning over your antiquing prowess. You are not a peacock trading survivability from Tigers for mating rights. And tennis shoes are hardly foul weather gear, or that Glouster statue of the guy in oilskins at the helm is all wrong.

Get some overboots. Look for young ladies wearing same. They probably have wider hips for bearing babies and wider space between their eyes for raising them.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just for the record, I'm not exactly trying to impress anyone. I'm no ladies' man. I do however, care about my appearance, like most people here, I imagine.

I don't discount your advice, I just want to make sure that my motives here are clear.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
wordsmith-y

Bravo, Kav. Bravo.

The typos even serve to indicate you composed quickly, off the cuff, which is more impressive still!

I once owned a rare british sportscar. It had a massive frame to protect the mechanics. Over this was coachwork to protect me. Over the coachwork was paint to protect against rust. I waxed the paint, put vintage grill guards over the vitange triplex headlamps that protected against darkness. I bought a flannel soft, no scratch car cover and moved a lot of junk out of the garage to park it indoors.
I found the girl I was dating in the back seat of a chevy wagon with american heating and a cassette player. She wasn't alone. There was utterly NO protection for my heart ( or his tyres.)

The fundamental reason for shoes is to protect your feet.
You need to put aside visions of young lovelies swooning over your antiquing prowess. You are not a peacock trading survivability from Tigers for mating rights. And tennis shoes are hardly foul weather gear, or that Glouster statue of the guy in oilskins at the helm is all wrong.

Get some overboots. Look for young ladies wearing same. They probably have wider hips for bearing babies and wider space between their eyes for raising them.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I've taken a look at these, guys, and the Commuter Tingley looks like what I need. Thanks.
I was in NY city last winter, and I was out walking on a rainy day. And I saw LOTS of people wearing rubber covers over their shoes. In fact the woman seemed to be taking the situation as an opportunity to showcase some special knee high rubber boots of all kinds of colors. It really struck me as odd at first, because I never noticed that here in DC. Maybe it's just because I'm not out walking downtown in the rain here.

Wearing those things is such a practical thing to do, though.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
I'm a young professional(not far out of college) in Washington, DC and I don't own a car, mainly because I don't need to.

However, this has made me realize that my dress shoes, which I wear to work every day, are much more of a functional item in my wardrobe that just a thing of ornamentation.
Hurray! I'm not the only one in the young professional/DC/no car/braving the weather category. :icon_smile:

For the well-dressed but car-less (not careless!) man, the first rule is to always have the umbrella and the overshoes in the bag, and the second rule is to bring the overcoat if it looks like rain. Unlike the car commuting masses, we cannot afford to be ignorant of the weather forecast.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Cordovan?

yesterday's posting at A Suitable Wardrobe discussed the next ASW shoe, a cordovan boot. In the posting, Will said,

"I call these winter boots because the cordovan skin makes them nearly as water resistant as a pair of ugly rubber overshoes in rain and light snow (do keep the overshoes for days when the snow is high enough to soak trouser cuffs)."

How true do the rest of you find this statement? Doesn't the water still come up through the sole and seams as described by the OP? Is a cordovan boot really an alternative?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
I once owned a rare british sportscar. It had a massive frame to protect the mechanics. Over this was coachwork to protect me. Over the coachwork was paint to protect against rust. I waxed the paint, put vintage grill guards over the vitange triplex headlamps that protected against darkness. I bought a flannel soft, no scratch car cover and moved a lot of junk out of the garage to park it indoors.
I found the girl I was dating in the back seat of a chevy wagon with american heating and a cassette player. She wasn't alone. There was utterly NO protection for my heart ( or his tyres.)

The fundamental reason for shoes is to protect your feet.
You need to put aside visions of young lovelies swooning over your antiquing prowess. You are not a peacock trading survivability from Tigers for mating rights. And tennis shoes are hardly foul weather gear, or that Glouster statue of the guy in oilskins at the helm is all wrong.

Get some overboots. Look for young ladies wearing same. They probably have wider hips for bearing babies and wider space between their eyes for raising them.
Well said. I agree with everthing that Kav said - for once, I even understood everything he said. :icon_smile:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,459 Posts
I apologise if I cover old ground hear as I join this discussion late.

I only buy welted shoes. This ensures that the construction between the leather upper and the sole are perfectly waterproof.

Leather soles are best. Although you should wear them in a little outside of rainy conditions, in order to attract just a little essential grip to their texture.

You won't go wrong if you make the step up to welted. Check out the Barker website, for some useful information on the subject.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
I'd agree with Mr. Pipps - get a pair of shoes with a goodyear welt. Where the upper is joined to the sole is where most of the water leaks in. Some shoes even have a storm welt to further reduce this possibility (check out the Crockett and Jones website for examples). I've done a lot of walking outdoors in bad weather while wearing fine shoes and getting my socks soaked hasn't often happened (I mainly recall one time when it did - a walk of over 5 miles in torrents of rain with 40 mph winds and no umbrella). Ankle boots would keep water from dripping in from off of your pants and these can be perfectly comfortable in warm weather, too. Topies would increase your traction on slippery surfaces and might make the soles more water resistant. An umbrella would definitely help - get a good one and you'll enjoy carrying it with you (check out James Smith and Swaine Adeney Briggs for the best - these will last many years) - and will allow you to rescue some of these beautiful women in bad weather.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
I apologise if I cover old ground hear as I join this discussion late.

I only buy welted shoes. This ensures that the construction between the leather upper and the sole are perfectly waterproof.

Leather soles are best. Although you should wear them in a little outside of rainy conditions, in order to attract just a little essential grip to their texture.

You won't go wrong if you make the step up to welted. Check out the Barker website, for some useful information on the subject.
Hello,
Sorry Mr. Pipps but this information isn't wholly accurate. Although I agree with the general gist of what you say, and only buy welted shoes myself, they are certainly not waterproof unless you buy those with Norwegian construction and rubber soles. If you read the disclaimers on many shoe websites you will see words to the effect that, as leather is a natural material, it cannot be guaranteed waterproof.

To quote from Jcusey's excellent article on the different types of shoe construction:

"I see two principal advantages for Goodyear-welted shoes, both emanating from the same aspect of construction. First, they are relatively water-resistant...".

Chris.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Boots may work as an alternative during the spring or fall when there is light rain, but as indicated above are typically not fully water-resistant with respect to the deep puddles that develop during periods of heavier rain.

But they are also not well-suited for the heavy use of salt during the winter, at least in the DC area; salt will do severe damage to fine shoes, so the overshoes are really the only alternative when the slush gets deep. I nearly lost one pair of shoes to salty slush, and after great lengths to repair them, I won't make that mistake again. The overshoes are in the bag at all times, and as soon as the snow falls and the salt gets distributed they go on.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top