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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been experimenting with what kind of pants I want lately and so far I think I've found what works best for me. High Rise pants with single reverse pleats (though I still have yet to actually try a pair with this), buckle side tab adjusters, tapered legs and plain hem bottoms. The reasons are as follows:
High Rise is more fitting for my slightly longer torso and prominent gut
Flat front pants are too tight and Double Pleats are so far for me too baggy. I know sartorially savvy people extol the virtues of two pleats, but they just don't seem to work all that well for me. Single reverse pleats seem just right.
Buckle side tabs whenever possible because they are so comfortable, though for my Berle tropical wool trousers I'll still have to use belts and Double Reverse Pleats (they have no options for single pleats BOOO)
Finally plain hems instead of cuffs EVEN with pleated pants because cuffs have not done anything well for me. They don't help the pants drape better, get caught on everything and look a little off on me. I think pleated pants can still look good without cuffs.
Feel free to chime in if any of you agree with my thoughts.
 

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I've been experimenting with what kind of pants I want lately and so far I think I've found what works best for me.
Since what you've mentioned are style and not fit choices, I cannot comment, under the none of my business clause, but I can offer this: since you feel double reverse pleats too baggy, and even single ones can be, consider forwards. I have experience with this, all of mine are forward and have had closed at the top so they begin three inches beneath the waist band, a combo flat and pleat arrangement that can give a clean look to the practicality of pleats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since what you've mentioned are style and not fit choices, I cannot comment, under the none of my business clause, but I can offer this: since you feel double reverse pleats too baggy, and even single ones can be, consider forwards. I have experience with this, all of mine are forward and have had closed at the top so they begin three inches beneath the waist band, a combo flat and pleat arrangement that can give a clean look to the practicality of pleats.
I don't like the look of forward pleats at all
 

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I don't like the look of forward pleats at all
And I much prefer forward pleats to reverse, like the Peakster. Vive la différence!

For my taste, it is a tidier look drawing in the sides and adds to the impression of the pants hugging the hips a bit, and not billowing out as the reverse pleats appear to do.
 

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Well, I am a big adherent of forward pleats, but I just received a pair of nice, cream coloured cotton trousers that are exactly like the OP describes. I like them a lot. The high rise makes the single reverse pleat fall flatter than traditional reverse pleats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's a slight chance the OP may be confused as to which are forward and which are reverse, since he says he's against bagginess. Here's hoping.
No I know what forward and reverse pleats are and I just think two pleats adds just a touch too much fabric. Single reverse pleats may not be the "classic" pleated pants, but they look a bit nicer.
 

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I've been experimenting with what kind of pants I want lately and so far I think I've found what works best for me. High Rise pants with single reverse pleats (though I still have yet to actually try a pair with this), buckle side tab adjusters, tapered legs and plain hem bottoms. The reasons are as follows:
High Rise is more fitting for my slightly longer torso and prominent gut
Flat front pants are too tight and Double Pleats are so far for me too baggy. I know sartorially savvy people extol the virtues of two pleats, but they just don't seem to work all that well for me. Single reverse pleats seem just right.
Buckle side tabs whenever possible because they are so comfortable, though for my Berle tropical wool trousers I'll still have to use belts and Double Reverse Pleats (they have no options for single pleats BOOO)
Finally plain hems instead of cuffs EVEN with pleated pants because cuffs have not done anything well for me. They don't help the pants drape better, get caught on everything and look a little off on me. I think pleated pants can still look good without cuffs.
Feel free to chime in if any of you agree with my thoughts.
I’ve starting to find I enjoy my single pleat trousers more and more each time I wear them. They are reverse pleat. I am looking to buy a pair of single forward pleat trousers next to compare. My reverse pair were made by Epaulet on their Taylor model. They said they can do forward if I want. I know O’Connell’s will do custom trousers, so I am going to call them one day to ask about a single format.

Opposite you though, I like cuffs. I found plain hems to feel incomplete and many times the slight break I prefer finds the hems getting caught on the shoes. A nice 1 3/4” cuff is perfect to me. I do think they hang better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
What's a good depth for pleats? Plenty of sources like Gentleman's Gazette have stated modern pleats have too little fabric, don't work as well and need to be proportional to your hip size. I hear that the main pleat should be about 1.5 inches and the second pleat (if you choose to have double pleats) should be half an inch.
 

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What's a good depth for pleats? Plenty of sources like Gentleman's Gazette have stated modern pleats have too little fabric, don't work as well and need to be proportional to your hip size. My hips are 46 inches.
My guess is that pleat depth does depend on one's physical size and thus on the waist, outseam and inseam of the trousers. Larger pairs will need pleats with greater depth. I believe the purpose of pleats, whether forward or reverse, is to ensure a proper drape, comfort and ease of movement. The trousers should drape well when standing still and also when moving. There is greater space at the hips when moving, and yet, that space will fall back to ensure a clean line and silhouette when standing. This is especially nice when the material is worsted and not heavier flannel.

Flat front trousers, on the other hand, ensure shape and comfort of movement (paradoxically, perhaps) by sitting close to the hips. If constructed correctly, they will hold their shape at the hip by hugging the torso, while permitting free movement in the legs. This is one of the reasons why I especially like high waists and rises in flat front trousers (as in military trousers).
 

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rs525:

I have always been a strong advocate of pleats and cuffs. However when I started playing golf a few years ago I found cuffs got full of dirt, grass, etc. I switched to no cuffs and that style found it's way into my non-golf trouser wardrobe!

The other advantage is when I wash cuffed pants, it's a pain to re-align the cuffs. I've asked several tailor why don't they tack cuffs at the front and back so they keep their configuration during washing. But they all said it just wasn't traditional!

I still like pleats. It's been a long time engineering function so that you can sit down!

Single pleat is preferred, and the most popular style is the single reverse pleat.
 

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I too have had to deal with the post-laundering cuff realignment problem, especially with cotton trousers. Two solutions: Move to no cuffs for cotton trousers and retain cuffs only for wool or other material that is traditionally dry cleaned; or press the cuffs on home-laundered cotton trousers after manually realigning them. A third approach is to send out all of your cuffed trousers and let a laundry specialist worry about it! I did this when I was working, but once retired, I stopped sending out shirts and trousers.
 

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Tacking at the front and back in addition to the in and out seams will keep the cuffs intact even while swimming the Mississippi, though correct that added tacks are not only not traditional, but look off, so you tack them not at the top, but about 3/4 inch down and the tacks go unseen. Takes about 5 minutes per cuff. Do it, and moan no more.
 

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For fancy pairs, have the tailor attach buttons, rather than sew in, the cuffs. That way prior to laundering, simply "unbutton" the cuffs, and shake out the dirt and debris that have accumulated.
Not as simple as you propose, for buttons require holes and a single pair would require four buttons and four holes, an expensive affair. And this does not address the problem described, the front and rear of the cuff coming apart in the wash. However, the idea of being able to empty the cuff is a good one, snaps will work, as well as miniscule hook and eyes.

Disclaimer, I don't suggest anything on this site unless I've done it myself. I have done cuff buttons and holes, a bitch. So I've cut up a useless shirt and used those button holes, since it's easier to hook stich a small piece of cloth to another then it is to cut and bind a hole through a couple layers of cloth.
 
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