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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I have been thinking of buying av pinstripe suit. There are some differences within this category, like smaller stripes and broader, chalk stripes. There is also a difference in the distance between the stripes themselves.

I have a couple of questions in connection with this:


1: What colours are appropriate for a pin stripe suit?

2: What pinstripe suit is the most formal, and the most relaxed? The one with smaller pinstripes, or the chalk pinstripe?

3: Is there a connection between the distance between the stripes and the formality of the suit? :confused:

Hope to hear from you!
 

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1. Navy and charcoal are most common.

2. The suit style would affect this but my personal and highly subjective opinion is that slightly blurred chalkstripes look smarter and more businesslike (which is what I assume you mean by formal).

3. Again my opinion but, within reason, I think broader spacings look more formal. Make it three piece and you get an automatic promotion at work :icon_smile_wink:.
 

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Recently I have been thinking of buying av pinstripe suit. There are some differences within this category, like smaller stripes and broader, chalk stripes. There is also a difference in the distance between the stripes themselves.

I have a couple of questions in connection with this:

1: What colours are appropriate for a pin stripe suit?

2: What pinstripe suit is the most formal, and the most relaxed? The one with smaller pinstripes, or the chalk pinstripe?

3: Is there a connection between the distance between the stripes and the formality of the suit? :confused:

Hope to hear from you!
The most classic stripe is a white/off white on a navy or gray ground. A pin stripe is created with a thread and a chalk stripe looks like it has been drawn on with a piece of chalk. Stripe suits in general are considered dressy. They were called "bankers suits" in the 60's. Very narrow or very widely spaced stripes are not as conservative. You should not have stripes spaced less than 3/8" apart or wider than 7/8" apart. The strength of the stripe has quite a bit of variation. Do not select something that is bold. Personal taste plays a large part in your choice. There will be both chalk and pin stripes that will do what you want.
Paul Winston
Winston Tailors
www.chipp2.com
 

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Some pinstripe suits have really the looked the business to me. But i have never realized the different types of pinstripes i was looking at, and that they had different names.
Bold chalkstripes is a new term to me, even though they are probably the pinstripe suits that i have been unknowingly admiring, and impressed with. Really authoritive looking, elegant, grand, regal and impressive is the only way i can describe the feelings i get when i see people wear them.
 

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I've always considered pinstripes to be a basic business suit. I agree with Paul that you should avoid anything too bold - you'll look like a hockey commentator. Its a great, versatile look and I fully encourage you to get one - I think everyone should own at least one, if not two.
 

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I am going to dissent here and say that you should go for a "bold[er]" pinstripe. Obviously you don't want anything cartooney or outrageous, but since you clearly want a striped suit, what's the point if you're going to go with muted stripes?

My suggestion would be navy with white or light gray thin pinstripes.
 

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Here is one example of a pin stripe suit from the home page of Thomas Mahon

Is it too bold, or can it be considered as a businesslike look?
An unremarkable good business look in the UK, might be considered too bold in parts of the US.

Personally, if I were putting together a new wardrobe, that specific type of stripe - colour, weight, etc. would be the very first. But then, I'm a British expat...
 

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An unremarkable good business look in the UK, might be considered too bold in parts of the US.

Personally, if I were putting together a new wardrobe, that specific type of stripe - colour, weight, etc. would be the very first. But then, I'm a British expat...
StephenRG, you've hit on an important undercurrent of this conversation -- Americans and Britons (if I may say they are) have very different tastes in striped suitings (suit materials). Americans tend to prefer quiet, subdued stripes; whilst our British friends seem to prefer quite striking stripes. A walk somewhere in the City of London, followed by a walk along Wall Street or on Capitol Hill here in DC, will illustrate this point.

Regarding stripe spacing: I find that 3/4" spacing seems to be by far the most common, at least for my small handful of American-made chalkstripe suits (though, as it happens, they're all made of English fabric). Personally, I'm rather drawn to the idea of making my next pinstripe (or chalkstripe; I haven't quite made up my mind) out of a suiting with a spacing of only about 1/2". It seems distinctive without being self-conscious or attention-grabbing.
 

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StephenRG, you've hit on an important undercurrent of this conversation -- Americans and Britons (if I may say they are) have very different tastes in striped suitings (suit materials). Americans tend to prefer quiet, subdued stripes; whilst our British friends seem to prefer quite striking stripes. A walk somewhere in the City of London, followed by a walk along Wall Street or on Capitol Hill here in DC, will illustrate this point.
I would even differentiate within America. In Washington D.C. and most of the rural part of the country--solids are preferred and for pinstripes, very muted subdued striping. In LA or NYC, I note much bolder striping--but still less than what would be considered mainstream in UK. I can't speak for Chicago, Boston or other locales as I don't get around there much.
 

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it is not too bold, and would probably be widely if not universally considered a businesslike look.
I'm not digging the peak lapels; such lapels detract from one's look as a professional. I'm sure conservative businesses would spot it, otherwise, elsewhere, not so much, or not care.

Here's a question: double breasted suit and pinstripes in today's business climate? Yay or nay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
chalkstripe

After some thought, I realise that I like the undefined lines of chalkstripe better than the sharper looking pinstripes, preferrably against a navy background.

If you for example use flannel cloth, you both get a very elegant and relaxed look.

Opinions, anyone?
 
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