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To some degree yes. The lower the quality of the cashmere, the more potential for pilling. The weave is likely looser with shorter fibers and a higher ratio of surface fibers so the garment feels smooth. Unfortunately this leads to fast pilling. Get a shaver, or use an old cartridge razor and gently remove the pilling.
 

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I'll echo the above sentiments - the cheap stuff pills.

It's worth investing in a really fine cashmere sweater. I have a Murray Allen I bought in 1990, and it looks like I bought it yesterday - it was $600 (on the high side because the price of cashmere spiked for a while after the Tienanmen Square massacre), but pricing that out over nearly 20 years it's a far, far better value than the crappy Brooks Brothers cashmere pullover I bought about 5 years ago (and which I now store in the trunk of my car in case a day turns cool).

I don't know the terminology off hand, but what you want in a good cashmere sweater is a "hard" finish - the soft, fuzzy finish you usually see (and which seems so deceptively cozy in the store) is the mark of bad cashmere. A longer thread gives a less "fuzzy" finish, and will last longer and pill less.

I'll say this - if my house catches fire, the Murray Allen is one of the 5 or 6 things I'll quickly grab on the way out ;)

DCH
 

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I'll echo the above sentiments - the cheap stuff pills.
Cashmere prices tanked in the some time after your purchase - I bought a four-ply sweater in a Christmas red at Neiman's for about $120 in the early 90s. Still looks good as new. Back then, four-ply was as high as they went; now they make sixteen-ply although I don't know that it's worth the dramatic prices.

My Field Gear sweater, which I think had an original price of $79, was pilling badly. My cleaners had no trouble getting it to look good as new. It's Marshall Field's Green, so there's no way I'm going to part with it until it gets holes...
 

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I prefer to buy the cheaper stuff and replace it when it starts looking old.
The question, of course, is whether that's really cost-effective.

If a $100 sweater lasts two years, and a $500 sweater lasts ten years, then you could be wearing a nicer sweater for far longer for about the same outlay.

Yes, I know... time value of money means that the $100 you spend in eight years isn't worth $100 now...
 

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Cashmere Care

I agree with the comments already made - there's nothing quite the heavier, more expensive cashmere. However, I have a couple of cheaper sweaters which are fine if you want the latest style/colour. However, they do suffer from pilling. I recommend using a cashmere care comb to remove the bobbles rather than a shaver as they can be a little over-enthusiastic and I have heard of them making holes in jumpers. Once you have removed the bobbles however, there's no reason why the less expensive cashmere shouldn't last several years if you look after it.
 

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Some info from a couple of different chapters of The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes (which would make a perfect Holiday gift - for yourself, a friend, a relative or you favorite store salesperson!! :icon_smile_big:) :

Pilling is caused by the abrasion of short fibers into small balls on the surface on the fabric.

The fiber has scales on the surface and when friction is applied it causes a small cluster known as pills. Longer fibers makes for stronger yarn that pills less. Lower quality manufactures use shorter fiber because it's cheaper but more likely to pill.

Pilling occurs when the knit surface develops little knots. Natural fibers when rubbed will get a knot or pill. Fabric pills also happen when the tiny fibers in our clothes gradually loosen due to wear and washing. When the fibers come undone, one loose stand can snag another that entangles. In time a pill forms. Don't pull them off your clothes.

You can remove them with an electric razor or better, an electric razor made for the purpose. Place the sweater on a hard surface and shave in a circular motion.

There are also stones that erase pills on sweaters. Dry Cleaners can also remove pills. To minimize pilling turn clothes inside out before washing and don't overload the washer.
 
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