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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on a performance piece/installation based on an event in southern California in 1910. I am hoping someone here can provide some sartorial information.

What would a 20 year-old upper middle class college student have worn on a camping trip to the local mountains when in the company of his fiance? the destination was accessible by auto or buggy, but the party would likely have travelled horseback and would have had a pack horse or two.

I have some information and a general idea of what I'm after, but what I'm hoping to get from the experts here is detailed information and specific recommendations as to cloth and cut of jacket and pants. The only photo I have of the event is of the women on the trip. But based on on other contemporary photos, I imagine the individual in question would have worn a suit jacket and slacks, white shirt and possibly a vest. Campaign hats were fashionable, I presume because of the recent war with Spain, or perhaps a sedate Stetson. Footwear could have been either high lace boots or packer style boots, probably black.

Thanks,
Gurdon
 

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the boots would be mid calf high laced black boots. khaki breeches. tan or brown two pocket shirt. solid brown or tan tie. s.b. jacket of cotton or wool twill, it may have a belt.
the hat could be anything, the sedate stetson is a good choice.
 

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I don't know what a "suit jacket" is, but I would have thought that a Norfolk jacket would have been on the cards.



Knickerbockers (plus twos/fours) would have been the most convenient thing to match them with, so as to avoid the hems from becoming muddied (they are very practical). I agree that you would have worn lace up ankle boots whether derbies or Oxfords - more likely brown.

This plate depicts leisure wear from 1888 and what they wore in 1910 would have been similar:



Notice they are wearing loosely knoted cravats as neckwear.

I don't think ladies went on serious camping expeditions in those days. It would have more likely have been a rather sedate affair if they went along. If they were wealthy, and the servants were to serve dinner in a mountains hut, a change into dinner clothes might have been considered ie dinner jacket.

Interestingly, one of the pioneers of modern recreational camping was Thomas Hiram Holding - a tailor, editor and author of a lot of major books in the late Victorian to Edwardian era on cutting and tailoring in London. He wrote a book on camping:

https://www.archive.org/stream/campershandbook00holdgoog

Unfortunately, this book has gone through more reprints than his excellent writings on tailoring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thank you all very much

I think I have enough to work with thanks to your thoughtful posts. I will tweak things a bit to take into account regional preferences and what I can glean from photographs. (Your comments help explain the photos.)

When things are in the can and there is an announcement for the exhibit of which this project will be a part, I will post it on Ask Andy.

Once again forum members come through.

All the best,
Gurdon

PS: Suit jacket is a term used in the western US to mean the jacket belonging to what in British usage is known as a lounge suit.
 

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The trouble with "suit jacket" is that in 1910 the jacket could have been a Norfolk jacket, a riding jacket, a sack jacket (lounge or reefer coat in British English), or maybe even a dinner jacket. These could be made up with plus twos/fours or trousers - either way it is a suit. The lounge jacket has today become a nameless garment and everyone is expected to know what is meant when people say "one of 'em thingies".

Just to illustrate. All three of these men are wearing suits:



Yet in each case the type of "suit jacket" they wear is significantly different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That was no fiance, my friend, I assure you!:devil:
You could be right. The photograph shows my grandmother and her cousin Verda. My grandmother wrote on the back, "Alice and Verda when we camped in the Arroya (sic)." The original photograph dated from about 1910. It shows the cousins in skirts (coulottes, actually) posed with revolvers. The location was the Arroyo Seco, where the Pasadena freeway now runs. they all lived in nearby Pasadena, so they weren't too far from home. I assume that my grandfather took the photograph. I also assume this was prior to their marriage. I could be wrong, in which case it would have been a camping trip with his wife, not his fiance.

I would like to think that my grandparents were sufficiently ahead of the times to have fooled around. But having known them both fairly well I doubt it.

Regards,
Gurdon
 

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C'mon, now . . .

You could be right. The photograph shows my grandmother and her cousin Verda. My grandmother wrote on the back, "Alice and Verda when we camped in the Arroya (sic)." The original photograph dated from about 1910. It shows the cousins in skirts (coulottes, actually) posed with revolvers. The location was the Arroyo Seco, where the Pasadena freeway now runs. they all lived in nearby Pasadena, so they weren't too far from home. I assume that my grandfather took the photograph. I also assume this was prior to their marriage. I could be wrong, in which case it would have been a camping trip with his wife, not his fiance.

I would like to think that my grandparents were sufficiently ahead of the times to have fooled around. But having known them both fairly well I doubt it.

Regards,
Gurdon
. . . your OP didn't mention anything about others being along. My remark does not apply, in that case:icon_smile_wink:
 
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