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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While it is scary that aaac post titles are beginning to resemble the names of scientific articles, the title reflects a legitimate question....

I have 2 pairs of custom slacks - one pair was $600 and one pair was $700 (better material).

The more expensive material does not hold wrinkles as much as the less expensive pair (a good thing).

What are the attributes of a material that make it less prone to wrinkling?
 

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Weave, heft, quality of the wool (I assume you're talking about wool) can all make a difference as far as I know. Heavier fabrics in grades like 80s are less prone to wrinkling than say, a lightweight Super 140s. There are some treated to hold creases. I'm betting like non-iron cottons, they don't breathe as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Weave, heft, quality of the wool (I assume you're talking about wool) can all make a difference as far as I know. Heavier fabrics in grades like 80s are less prone to wrinkling than say, a lightweight Super 140s.
Both pairs are worsted wool. I think that the better pair might be 120's while the lesser pair might be 110's.

However, I think that the twill weave of the better pair may have fewer inconsistencies in the twill weave pattern. In fact , now that I am describing this attribute, it occurs to me that the inconsistencies in the twill weave may be one of the main reasons why the lesser material holds wrinkles more than the better material.

I assume that the better (more expensive) material generally has a more consistent twill weave pattern. Is this correct?
 

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Trousers in the high super numbers ....

wil wrinkle more easily than those with lower numbers. I never buy any odd trousers above super 100. Unless you've money to spare, the price you paid is rediculous. I have about 40 trousers, and at $600 each they would rpresent a substantial investment. I have no physical flaws and can fit easily into rtw. I never pay more than $250, and I never have wrinkles.
 

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Quality numbers only tells you what quality wool was used. A higher quality number does not mean the cloth is better- only that a finer quality wool was used . Cloth is more than the quality of the wool. The wool must be spun, woven and finished- all important steps. A cheap execution in any of the steps makes a difference in the end product. Nature of the weave and weight also play a part in how well a cloth will hold its shape. Everything else being equal, the heavier the cloth the better it will hold its shape.
 
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