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I was looking at developing a separate, but small, outdoor wardrobe for things such as light hiking or a day at the outdoor archery or rifle range in the colder fall/winter/spring seasons. I don't need the usual hunting gear such as orange vests or camoflauge. So, what exactly should a gentleman wear to look good but stay functional for such an occasion. What pieces should he look to include in such a wardrobe?

I was thinking mainly going with LL Bean because the quality is decent and the price is right for the amount of use I will be getting out of it.

I was thinking along the lines of:

2-3 basic button down oxfords
2-3 cotton sweaters
1 lambswool sweater
1-2 pairs of durable jeans
1-2 pairs of durable chinos
1-2 mock or full turtlenecks
1 Sweater vest
1 Vest type jacket

This would also be in addition to my already owned Barbour wax jacket, leather hiking boots, and a few other misc. pieces.

Any comments, additions, etc.?
 

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For shirts consider Viyella button downs. The fabric is a blend of 80% cotton and 20% wool, so is noticeably warmer than all cotton, yet not at all scratchy and also looks good. It lasts several years of frequent wearing.
For pants consider Filson shelter cloth - much more comfortable than blue jeans, but very durable.
For socks consider Smartwool - they offer a large selection of woolen socks that are very comfortable in all conditions, even in hot weather (more breathable than cotton). You don't necessarily have to choose the hiking socks - they make city type socks that would be very comfortable for hiking as well, but look good enough to wear with a suit. Buy a size up to allow for shrinkage if you wash in hot water.
The Barbour jacket is great, but you might also like a Ventile jacket - very breathable, but also very good in cold, windy, rainy type weather (these are expensive, but often deals pop up on eBay).
 

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I would swap the numbers for cotton and lambswool sweaters. Lambswool is warmer. I keep my cotton sweaters for the spring-summer or when being indoors. It depends how cold is it, I been in North Scotland in the winter and it can get really, really cold and the thickness of the sweater, shirt, socks, jacket can make the difference.

2-3 Shirts oxfords are fine , I would have at least one heavy shirt. Depending on when you go and the weather, you may need a heavier shirt to keep you warm (re: sweater). Especially if you hiking really early.

I would add thermal gloves and scarf, and thick socks. You could have 7 layers of clothing but if your hands are cold, the rest of your body will feel cloth.
 

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I would swap the numbers for cotton and lambswool sweaters. Lambswool is warmer. I keep my cotton sweaters for the spring-summer or when being indoors. It depends how cold is it, I been in North Scotland in the winter and it can get really, really cold and the thickness of the sweater, shirt, socks, jacket can make the difference.

2-3 Shirts oxfords are fine , I would have at least one heavy shirt. Depending on when you go and the weather, you may need a heavier shirt to keep you warm (re: sweater). Especially if you hiking really early.

I would add thermal gloves and scarf, and thick socks. You could have 7 layers of clothing but if your hands are cold, the rest of your body will feel cloth.
- Great point on the gloves, scarf and socks. Might add a good thermal hat and/or ear protection to the equation too. I also have a Kakadu (from STP) hat that has a broader brim and is treated with oil to be waterproof. Like a more moderate version of a cowboy hat, but prepared for wet and nasty weather. Not as good in the cold, but for most things above freezing it's great.

- Agree on swapping the sweaters - the wool will be more versatile and more useful in the cold.

- Also agree on adding at least one heavy shirt - I have some wool shirts from Polo that I wear all the time. I treat them more or less like a sweater or light jacket depending on how many layers I have on.

In addition:

Might also add 1 to the Turtleneck list. Easy to put on as a bottom layer and they type of thing that's very flexible.

A pair of cords or moleskin pants are excellent i the fall/winter.

A quilted jacket, like Barbour also makes, layers nicely under the waxed jacket for cold days. STP has them for not too much money, but I've also gotten one from Polo for 30.00 at the outlet.
 

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+1 for the following:

Smartwool socks
Cords/Moleskin pants

My advice on the sweaters: Merino! A great layering weight without adding bulk. Lambswool is certainly warmer, but also thicker and coarser, and often not as convenient for going in and out of doors.
 

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When I'm hiking, I really like North Face and Sierra Designs base layers. A little modern and technical, but very nice stuff. Reasonably priced too.

As for overclothes, are you crossing any rivers? My favorite safari coat might be good for a hunting trip, but cotton can be bloody cold when wet from a late fall river crossing.

My favorite hunting style outfit is based around an OD Canadian Forces battledress jacket which I've had since age 14. It's easy to wear, warm, holds shells efficiently and the pockets have lots of room. I know you don't need camoflage, but this jacket could pass for any number of high end retail jackets (provided it's an 82 pattern jacket, not the new Cadpat). I've worn it from gopher hunting excursions, to field manuvers with the Regiment as a boy soldier.

Another good source for hunting clothes is Sears Wier Golf line. Professional and efficient, while being made of high tech fabric.

Thomas
 
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