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I have no idea about the blazer, but I was very happy with O'Connell's customer service and what I ordered when I bought a suit from them recently. One thing to keep in mind is that they have a ton of blazers that aren't on the website. Some of their older stock might be fully canvassed, but I'm 99% positive the one linked here is not.
 

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^ I too can vouch for their customer service. I purchased a pair of Quoddy boats through O'Connell's and had to return them for a larger size. The interaction was perfectly courteous and efficient.

I've been curious about their blazers for a long time. They tend to go unmentioned (or under-mentioned, anyway) around here.
 

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I actually own one of these and love it. I like that the fabric is neither cheap nor fine, and that it's stitched together to last. Weight-wise, it's a good year-'round jacket for this climate. It fit perfectly out of the box, and I never worry about sweating through it or spilling something on it because I know it'll clean up well. And if it doesn't, I can buy an exact replacement for about $200.00 less than the equivalent number from Brooks. I like my Trad clothing robust, well-fitting, and moderately-priced (986s notwithstanding), and this jacket fills the bill perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I actually own one of these and love it. I like that the fabric is neither cheap nor fine, and that it's stitched together to last. Weight-wise, it's a good year-'round jacket for this climate. It fit perfectly out of the box, and I never worry about sweating through it or spilling something on it because I know it'll clean up well. And if it doesn't, I can buy an exact replacement for about $200.00 less than the equivalent number from Brooks. I like my Trad clothing robust, well-fitting, and moderately-priced (986s notwithstanding), and this jacket fills the bill perfectly.
Thank you one and all for the suggestions. This was my take--that you could have a blazer equivalent to what you might buy at Brooks or J Press for less money. I'm also going to look at the their older blazers. My son is about to inherit my current good one--actually an older Jos Banks with minimal shoulder padding and a nice 3-button roll (alas it has darts), so I figured I'm due for a replacement.
 

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How are the shoulders on your O'Connell's blazer?

I have an old 346 blazer with awesomely natural, understated shoulders. But the newer Press and BB blazers that I try on strike me as way too shouldery.

I actually own one of these and love it. I like that the fabric is neither cheap nor fine, and that it's stitched together to last. Weight-wise, it's a good year-'round jacket for this climate. It fit perfectly out of the box, and I never worry about sweating through it or spilling something on it because I know it'll clean up well. And if it doesn't, I can buy an exact replacement for about $200.00 less than the equivalent number from Brooks. I like my Trad clothing robust, well-fitting, and moderately-priced (986s notwithstanding), and this jacket fills the bill perfectly.
 

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I like O'Connells a lot. I just made my first purchase there this week, a charcoal cableknit shetland sweater, and I have to say the customer service was top notch. I would not hesitate to try out one of their sportcoats or blazers.
 

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I like O'Connells a lot. I just made my first purchase there this week, a charcoal cableknit shetland sweater, and I have to say the customer service was top notch. I would not hesitate to try out one of their sportcoats or blazers.
I can't help but wonder if the pricing and excellent customer service have something to do with the fact that they're in Buffalo (of Forbes' recent "America's Fastest Dying Cities" list). I know there are still some affluent folks in Buffalo- but you know, how many people left there can afford, let alone even still regularly wear this kind of clothing? I mean no disgrace to Buffalo- I just imagine they must look upon the internet and this forum as a godsend at that store.
 

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One reason for O'Connell's reasonable pricing on certain items is that they do not get rid of old stock and do not reprice old stock when the next year comes around. The price you pay is the price that was put on the item when it was first stocked.
 

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Zot! said:
I can't help but wonder if the pricing and excellent customer service have something to do with the fact that they're in Buffalo (of Forbes' recent "America's Fastest Dying Cities" list). I know there are still some affluent folks in Buffalo- but you know, how many people left there can afford, let alone even still regularly wear this kind of clothing? I mean no disgrace to Buffalo- I just imagine they must look upon the internet and this forum as a godsend at that store.
You'd think, but in fact Ethan told me in the past that their sales are dominated by regular in-store sales. Internet sales represent a small portion of their overall sales, and the item they sell most of (by far) over the internet is the Baracuta jackets. He also told me their low prices are due to paying Buffalo property rents (and taxes?), which are substantially less than rents being paid by J Press in NYC, for example. They also keep margins as low as possible and I remember Ethan complaining about the Alden price increases back in January, since the local market is price sensitive. Identifying the impact of AAAT or "the fora" is obviously impossible, but I don't believe he considered them to be significant in any way (I don't want to put words in his mouth, but that was my strong impression from his rather vague comments on the topic). Basically, if the internet disappeared tomorrow, companies like BB and J Press would take a hit, but I believe OLC would continue merrily along (although they'd sell a lot less Baracuta's). As for affluent people, a drive through parts of Buffalo will reveal that a lot of presumably affluent people are still living there. The obscenely(sp) rich, the high-flyers who think they are at the centre of the universe, have all moved out for more important and 'sexier' cities, but then these people don't buy sack suits and repp ties anyway. No, it's the quietly wealthy, "millionaire next door" types who shop at OLC, and at their prices you don't have to be super-wealthy anyway.
 

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As for affluent people, a drive through parts of Buffalo will reveal that a lot of presumably affluent people are still living there. The obscenely(sp) rich, the high-flyers who think they are at the centre of the universe, have all moved out for more important and 'sexier' cities, but then these people don't buy sack suits and repp ties anyway. No, it's the quietly wealthy, "millionaire next door" types who shop at OLC, and at their prices you don't have to be super-wealthy anyway.
I don't really associate Trad with modern blue-collar populations either. My impression is that it's always been a little more popular with people in government, finance and law [at least transactional law] who have more conservative tastes. What I hear of Buffalo these days strikes me as the kind of place where Nordstrom is for "really rich" people.

I know that sounds very condescending, and it probably is- as well as a bit uninformed too. Living in the vicinity of one of the "sexier cities," as you put it, I've often contemplated living in some place like Buffalo or Rochester. The cost of living is actually reasonable, there are a suprisingly large number of cultural institutions, and Toronto is just a drive away to get your cosmopolitan fix. But the weather- oh gawd...
 

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One reason for O'Connell's reasonable pricing on certain items is that they do not get rid of old stock and do not reprice old stock when the next year comes around. The price you pay is the price that was put on the item when it was first stocked.
That can be good or bad
 

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That can be good or bad
Since most of the items OLC stocks tend to be very conservative and classically styled and they carefully store items to avoid any damage to them, I don't think it is a problem. I bought a suit that was at least 15 years old (defunct manufacturer, made to higher standards than 99% of suits in the price range) and there was no problem with it.
 

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^ I think he meant in the sense that just about every retail operation seeks to avoid large inventory. From my understanding, the thinking goes that inventory that doesn't move is basicaly overhead without profit. As you described, the kind of business O'Connels is in might not exactly fit that model, but I imagine there are a lot of people (for better or worse) who are just not willing to buy a "new" 15 year-old suit- at least not at prices you can make a profit on.
 
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