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[thanks VERY much for the explanations ;-) ]

I'm amazed by the number of online manufacturers and retailers that advertise their men's shoe as an Oxford when it quite clearly has open lacing and is a Derby by what I understand the definition to be.

Anyone else notice this?
 

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You seem to have mistaken one facet of Medward's excellent explanation to your original question here:
https://askandyaboutclothes.com/community/showthread.php?t=91911&highlight=blucher+balmoral

In American English both bluchers and balmorals are called oxfords.

Although I would violate that a little and still call a shoe like this a derby.
https://www.pediwear.co.uk/crockett/products/2285.php

I think that's just me.

[thanks VERY much for the explanations ;-) ]

I'm amazed by the number of online manufacturers and retailers that advertise their men's shoe as an Oxford when it quite clearly has open lacing and is a Derby by what I understand the definition to be.

Anyone else notice this?
 

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[thanks VERY much for the explanations ;-) ]

I'm amazed by the number of online manufacturers and retailers that advertise their men's shoe as an Oxford when it quite clearly has open lacing and is a Derby by what I understand the definition to be.

Anyone else notice this?
Maybe you really don't understand what an Oxford shoe is!!

Get a copy of my book on CD-rom, The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes (it costs less than what you spent today on lunch!) and you'll find in the extensive chapter on Shoes:

OXFORD describes all lace-up shoes that don't rise above the ankle.
It was originally a half boot introduced in 1640 and worn by Oxford University students in England. Oxford then became a shoemaker's term to distinguish low cut shoes from boots.

Oxfords are divided into two different lace-up systems:


1. The Blucher is named for Field-Marshall Gebhard Leberecht von Blucher, Prussian commander at the battle of Waterloo in 1815. He devised this type of lace system for army wear in 1810. It laces up center front through six pairs of eyelets, and the tongue and vamp are cut in one piece with an open throat.

These are also know as Derby (men's shoes) or Gibson (women's shoes).



2. Balmoral or Bal is named after the Queen Victoria's Scottish castle, which is still in possession of the British Royal Family and was first worn there in the 1850's.

The tongue is cut in a separate piece from the vamp and joined with stitching across the vamp. It has a closed throat, which means the leather piece through which the laces pass is joined at the bottom in a "V" (
closed lacing).

Mixed Terminology: In some countries "Oxford" refers to a shoe with closed lacing ("Balmorals"), and "Derby" is used to refer to open lacing ("Blucher").
 
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