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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed that most of the posters at this forum have it in for non-iron shirts of any kind, and any brand. Why is that? Are there long-term problems that occur with non-iron shirts because of the way that they are treated to resist wrinkling?
 

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My two all-time favourite dress shirts that I have owned were both non-iron. They gave me hours of wrinkle-free wear with minimal fuss or care and earned as many compliments as any other shirts I've owned. In other words, I'd be interested to hear the complaints about non-iron too. I'm guessing it will be a general dislike of the feel of the fabric.
 

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Some of the cheaper wrinkle-free shirts, especially those that are cotton/poly blends are not very soft and therefore, not very comfortable, especially around the neck. For several years now I've been buying Traveler Collection shirts from Jos A Bank and like them very much. In my opinion they are comfortable, well-made shirts that not only require little ironing out of the dryer, but maintain a crispness throughout the day that most standard dress shirts can't do. If you can find these shirts on sale or clearance (I've bought many before for $19.99), they are a steal in my opinion. I think the reason they get a lot of bad press here is that most of this forum is geared toward the upper eschelon of clothing. If you talk about pairing a non-iron shirt with something like a Brioni or Oxxford suit, you will most certainly stir up some controversy. For someone like me who doesn't wear $1000 suits to work everyday, a good quality wrinkle-free shirt does just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Again, if you wear a tee under the dress shirt, which you should, the texture of the dress shirt would not make a lot of difference. What your skin would be feeling is the t-shirt.

My guess as to why a lot of the trad posters on AAAC are against non-iron is because it's a fairly recent technological innovation, which is no reason at all.
 

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BG,

Since my years in the military (a long time ago) I have always worn a t-shirt under my dress shirts. Like the poster above, I own and like JAB Traveler (non-iron) shirts. Still, there are shirts whose material can make them uncomfortable on the parts of my body that are not covered by my t-shirt; most of the sleeve, the cuffs and the collar.

I agree some just don't like the technology, but comfort can clearly be real issue, also.
 

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If you knew anything about quality dress shirts....

you wouldn't make such remarks. Many of the members here wear 120s up to 200s, 2 fold shirts which are custom made in many instances. They are not against non-iron shirts per se, but for finer clothing made to their specifications and with cloth not even available in non-iron. One does not pay $200 to $300 for a shirt and buy a non-iron shirt. Remember this forum was created for men who enjoy the finer clothing, and if they do wear a t shirt it would probably be a Zimmerili which probably runs more than what you pay for your dress shirts.
 

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I really like No-Iron Dress Shirts. I've not tried the BB or the JAB shirts but I have several of the W.H. Belk brand shirts and I love them. They are 100% cotton, super comfortable, and they still look good at the end of the day. If I preach in a regualar dress shirt they look terrible when I get done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, as I take it, the reason that some here don't wear non-iron shirts is because the highest quality shirt makers (bespoke and Paul Stuart) have yet to utilize the technology of non-iron. Why that makes all the non-iron shirts that Brooks Brothers sells a bad thing? That's beyond me.
 

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I don't think anyone is saying they're a "bad thing," they're just in a different league than other shirts that happen to be of higher quality. It's like a Volvo versus a Rolls Royce. There's nothing wrong with a Volvo. They're good cars, but they're not Rolls Royce's by any means. At this point in time you're just not going to find a non-iron shirt that can match the quality and construction of some of the finer dress shirts that a lot of members on this forum prefer. I'm just guessing, but if the day ever arrives that custom dress shirt makers offer their finest shirts in a non-iron version, a lot of guys will probably buy them (assuming the non-iron's fit, feel and everything else meets or exceeds the standard version's). Keep in mind also that it's recommended that basically all dress shirts (including non-iron) be professionally laundered, negating the need to iron the shirt anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This will get me crucified, but my opinion is that the practical difference between wearing a $20 shirt from J.C. Penny's and something that's over $100 is only marginal. And there's always the option to replace clothing when it wears out. :icon_smile_wink:

Keep in mind also that it's recommended that basically all dress shirts (including non-iron) be professionally laundered, negating the need to iron the shirt anyway.
This seems excessively elitist. Most people here are at least upper middle class working professionals, but do mind the fact that you're talking to a 19-year-old, who from his perspective recognizes neither an adequate difference between professional and machine laundering nor a justification to pay considerably more it. Cool washing the shirts, throwing them in the dryer, and spot ironing them has never done them an ounce of harm.
 

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This will get me crucified, but my opinion is that the practical difference between wearing a $20 shirt from J.C. Penny's and something that's over $100 is only marginal. And there's always the option to replace clothing when it wears out. :icon_smile_wink:
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You might not be able to tell the difference, but many others can. But at the age of 19, I probably wouldn't have been able to tell the difference either. It took me to about my low to mid-twenties to start appreciating good quality clothing.
 

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You might not be able to tell the difference, but many others can.
Perhaps if you are wearing a really cheap polyester shirt, but I doubt that one in a hundred that you encounter during the course of a normal day would really notice any significant difference in a decent quality all cotton non-iron shirt and a high end shirt.

Once you get to a Brooks Brothers, or even a Lands End, non-iron shirt the readily noticable difference to an average person is neglible. In fact, to many exactly the opposite would be true as they would think the wrinkles in the high end shirt are indicative of a lesser quality shirt, not a better quality. I'm not saying that the typical person posting in this forum would think that, but the average joe on the street might.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not begrudging anyone who enjoys wearing high end bespoke shirts that enjoyment. Heck, I say go for it. Just realize that you are essentially doing it for your own inner enjoyment as most folks just don't notice the difference between your shirts and other decent quality shirts that are much less expensive or of a lesser quality material.

It's like any other interest or hobby. The example I've used before is of the photography enthusiast. While he may be very impressed with his expensive camera with exotic lenses, most others don't really think anything about it and happily go about their business with a simple point and shoot.

Cruiser
 

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I own two or three non-iron dress shirts (I think all are from Brooks Brothers...need to check) and I can honestly say I like them a lot. They come in particularly handy when I travel.

If you like the idea of a non-iron shirt, I say buy the best one you can comfortably afford. As Cruiser pointed out, almost no one will ever be able to tell the difference...and even if they do, they should be paying attention to you, not your shirt.
 

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Perhaps if you are wearing a really cheap polyester shirt, but I doubt that one in a hundred that you encounter during the course of a normal day would really notice any significant difference in a decent quality all cotton non-iron shirt and a high end shirt.

Once you get to a Brooks Brothers, or even a Lands End, non-iron shirt the readily noticable difference to an average person is neglible. In fact, to many exactly the opposite would be true as they would think the wrinkles in the high end shirt are indicative of a lesser quality shirt, not a better quality. I'm not saying that the typical person posting in this forum would think that, but the average joe on the street might.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not begrudging anyone who enjoys wearing high end bespoke shirts that enjoyment. Heck, I say go for it. Just realize that you are essentially doing it for your own inner enjoyment as most folks just don't notice the difference between your shirts and other decent quality shirts that are much less expensive or of a lesser quality material.

It's like any other interest or hobby. The example I've used before is of the photography enthusiast. While he may be very impressed with his expensive camera with exotic lenses, most others don't really think anything about it and happily go about their business with a simple point and shoot.

Cruiser
I didn't correctly phrase what I wanted to say. I didn't mean "others" as in people who see you walking down the street. I mean "others" as in other people choosing to buy a high end shirt as opposed to a cheap shirt.

My point is this: give me a $20 Penny's dress shirt and a high end dress shirt and let me compare them side to side. I willl be able to tell many, many differences between the two.

It's about a personal appreciaton for quality.
 

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Remember this forum was created for men who enjoy the finer clothing, and if they do wear a t shirt it would probably be a Zimmerili which probably runs more than what you pay for your dress shirts.
No offence, but I find it very hard to believe that the majority of posters here wear an $80 undershirt.
 

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For those posters who seem to register a shirt's worth based solely on what other people might think of it, I say this: if you have no complaints about your non-iron dress shirts, then I am happy for you. Really.

Personally, my metric for a dress shirt, or any item of clothing for that matter, is this and this only: how does it feel on my skin, and look to me? And by that metric, non-iron shirts fail miserably compared to even moderately-priced untreated (so-called "must-iron") cotton shirts.

I would wager that some of the most well-regarded of the non-iron breed are Brooks Brothers's, and I can tell you that I have purchased and promptly returned these shirts because they felt uncomfortable against my skin, made me feel hotter and sweat more because they don't breathe like untreated cotton.

And are you corn-fed American middle-managers ready for this? Wrinkle-free non-iron dress shirts make you look like a mannequin and a dupe. If you ever traveled abroad and met men of refinement and culture who possessed an actual sense of style you'd probably still be unable to understand that a real cotton dress shirt has a bit of wrinkling and this is something that is GOOD, because it echoes the asymmetry and randomness that is the essence of all things which are interesting, substantive, and meaningful.

I know. I lost you at mannequin, because it made you think of that movie and hoo boy wasn't Kim Catrall hot in that one? Wang dang! If only she could see you in your Max Headroom non-iron dress shirt, you might be tapping that as we speak.

Technological advancement? Keep telling yourself that as you walk down the street with your cellphone in a dumb-ass plastic belt holster
and a jackass bluetooth headset stuck to the side of your face. You so rock, Future Man.

Okay, so I've had a few drinks. But still.
 

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I think the main reason members here don't care for(I'm putting it mildly) non-Iron shirts is the feeling that they don't breathe a well as regular cotton, and the collars and cuffs are fused:eek:.
Personally, I rather like Brooks Brothers non-iron shirts, because I can wash them, hang them to dry and wear them without professionally laundering them. I don't really notice them the be less breathable, but that depends mostly on the thickness of the fabric.
I noticed that the most recent group of shirts I ordered were a little scratchy(BB BrooksCool) right out of the bag, but after a couple of washings, they were much better. One of the shirts I got on the big sale was a casual stripe that retailed for $95., apparently one step above the regularly $79.50, and it was a non-non-iron. It is very, very soft, and obviously a finer fabric that the others, and because it's thinner, it does breathe better.
Finally, I see the value in better shirts, and I can see the difference that better fabrics and construction make. I even own a couple of Canalli shirts that retailed for $200. ea. But...I do believe that Brooks Brothers Luxury shirts, Ike Behar and others are just as well made, and somewhat cheaper. Brooks Luxury are about $127.50, and Behars run about $160.
Basically what I'm saying is that if I had the money just have them custom made, but for now BB work quite nicely:aportnoy:

Mark S.

P.S. After reading T. C. Fop's reply, I have to agree with what he says about shirt wrinkling. It reminds me of the time I was trying to learn to pinstripe a car, ala Von Dutch, with a striping brush by hand. When I commented that it wasn't perfect, my friend who had watched me do it said,"Hell, it's not supposed to be perfect, it was done by hand!"
Also, +1 on the "jackass bluetooth headset stuck to the side of your face."
 
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