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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out of curiosity, which national costume items interest you? This is a subject that I don't think has been discussed before on the forum, but one that is quite interesting.

I find the Indian shervani (when done right) to be a very elegant item, though I'm perhaps biased due to my Indian ancestry. It is the coat worn by Prime Minister Nehru below.
 

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I like to wear kilts (I've got two), even for mountain climbing.

Since I'm actually German, I have some items of "Tracht" including a vest and a jacket. Interestingly, in Germany Tracht can often be worn in lieu of black tie for social events. We are not talking lederhosen here, but a suit or jacket and long pants.
 

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Well as an Irishman, the kilt of course. I've got two.

And yes, the kilt just like whiskey originated in Ireland.
And traditionally from the days of the Gaels onwards Irish kilts were also plaid.
However, military, state, and dancing kilts have always been of one of the official colours
Saffron, navy, grey.
Surprisingly top outsiders green kilts are a recent but still rare phenomena (There's a huge story here,which I won't go into in lots of detail, suffice to say that the wearing of the green was banned by Cromwell -wearing it carried the death penalty. And my mother a superstitious woman from the west never wears green just like the majority of Irish people of her generation - wearing green meant bad luck for hundreds of years from the days of Cromwell onwards)


The Irish tribe in Ulster, the Scotti, took the kilt to northern Britain with them when they first started raiding and invading the northwest coast of Britain in the 3rd century AD.

Another fact is that up to the 1600s Scottish kings had to be of Irish blood, descended from the original Irish kings of Scotland.

And yet another fact is that Scottish Gaedhlig and Manx Gaelg are both daughter languages of Irish Gaeilge.



Regimental Drum Major of the Royal Irish Rangers in saffron kilt and wearing the caubeen, traditional headgear of Irish troops. The "royal" of course indicating that this, like the "Royal Irish Regiment" is a regiment of the British army and NOT of the IDF (Irish Defence Forces)




IDF piper of an infantry battalion in saffron kilt on duty somewhere with the UN, probably in the 50s or 60s, when the IDF (including 3 of my uncles) were in Lebanon, Cyprus and the Congo to name just three IDF UN missions.
 

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Awesome Thread.

Congratulations on beating me to the National Costume Thread. I've been collecting materials for about 6 years on East African tribal Costume. A recent computer virus wiped out 4 years of images and notes. I look forward to seeing this topic continued and maybe a related thread on how you incorporate national costume into western/suit wearing.

I unfortunately own no articles of my formal tribal costume. I do contain an informal variant and would like to post it but my camera sucks & is broken.

If I do recover my work I would like to do a round of images at a time like the Earl of Ormonde did. It is a shame I can't.

Best Regards.
 

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And yes, the kilt just like whiskey originated in Ireland.
And traditionally from the days of the Gaels onwards Irish kilts were also plaid.
What a load of cobblers.

The kilt was a relatively late invention. Up until about 1500 the Gaels of Scotland and Ireland both wore a leine (a long, loose shirt, sometimes kilted and often dyed safron), and a brat (plaid blanket). After this time, in Scotland, the blanket began to be folded (kilted) and belted about the waist with the top half arranged about the upper body in various manners. However, this feileadh mhor, or great kilt, only lasted about 150 years. From about 1650 the top half was separated from the bottom half which had the folds stitched in, giving rise to the feileadh beg, or small kilt, which is the kilt recognised today.

The small kilt then migrated to Ireland, partly as a result of the influence of the British army, and partly as a result of the Celtic revival of the 19th century.

Surprisingly, Mel Gibson got it very, very wrong.
 

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There's more were that came from:














^^ Chinese undershirt and trousers

They are made by Minghua Tang, a maker who specialises in Ming Dynasty style clothing. IMHO, their attention to detail and quality use of material and tailoring is second to none. Currently ordering a set to wear for Chinese New Year!
 

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I quite often sport a Nehru waistcoat I bought in the market in Lahore - I normally wear it with a pochette but sans tie as Friday casual. I also usually wear a salwar kameez as a nightshirt. The other ethnic Friday option is an Austrian Janker by Giesswein and for other days of the week when it's really cold a Loden coat though the latter has now entered the mainstream somewhat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What a load of cobblers.

The kilt was a relatively late invention. Up until about 1500 the Gaels of Scotland and Ireland both wore a leine (a long, loose shirt, sometimes kilted and often dyed safron), and a brat (plaid blanket). After this time, in Scotland, the blanket began to be folded (kilted) and belted about the waist with the top half arranged about the upper body in various manners. However, this feileadh mhor, or great kilt, only lasted about 150 years. From about 1650 the top half was separated from the bottom half which had the folds stitched in, giving rise to the feileadh beg, or small kilt, which is the kilt recognised today.

The small kilt then migrated to Ireland, partly as a result of the influence of the British army, and partly as a result of the Celtic revival of the 19th century.

Surprisingly, Mel Gibson got it very, very wrong.
by two historians at the Victoria and Albert museum.
 

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What a load of cobblers.

The kilt was a relatively late invention. Up until about 1500 the Gaels of Scotland and Ireland both wore a leine (a long, loose shirt, sometimes kilted and often dyed safron), and a brat (plaid blanket). After this time, in Scotland, the blanket began to be folded (kilted) and belted about the waist with the top half arranged about the upper body in various manners. However, this feileadh mhor, or great kilt, only lasted about 150 years. From about 1650 the top half was separated from the bottom half which had the folds stitched in, giving rise to the feileadh beg, or small kilt, which is the kilt recognised today.

The small kilt then migrated to Ireland, partly as a result of the influence of the British army, and partly as a result of the Celtic revival of the 19th century.
Fun answer: Cobblers, I don't buy into all that revisionist nonsense based on supposed academic research. I'll stick with the ancient Irish oral stroytelling tradition handed down from...blah blah blah blah (Hey, if it's a good enough method for bible stories, it's good enough for me ) :icon_smile_big:

Serious answer: I know you're right of course. Just winding up the Scots a bit!

Also another interesting fact is that tartans applying to individual clans is also a relatively new phenomena, apparently from as late as the 1700s.
 

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Also another interesting fact is that tartans applying to individual clans is also a relatively new phenomena, apparently from as late as the 1700s.
Even later! I think the first 'clan tartans' approved by chiefs were the ones made by Wilsons and approved about 1840 (going by memory). Prior to that about five regionally standardised setts (now called district tartans) had been identified. The romantic image of Scotland has been the greatest piece of modern marketing the world has ever seen.
 

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Indeed, George IV's visit to Edingurgh, first time for a Hanover, stage managed by Walter Scott, gave rise to an image and industry that just keeps on giving. Suddenly every lowland landowner and family had a "clan" tartan though their genes were largely Anglo-Saxon.

While no one enjoys a bit of Scottish-American foppery more than moi, I realize the thread to ancient Gaeldom is, while real, quite embellished.
 

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Charlie: Those are brilliantly made and artistic clothes. I'd wear them, except I'd probably just look like a Chinese-wannabe white boy. :(
 

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Fun answer: Cobblers, I don't buy into all that revisionist nonsense based on supposed academic research. I'll stick with the ancient Irish oral stroytelling tradition handed down from...blah blah blah blah (Hey, if it's a good enough method for bible stories, it's good enough for me ) :icon_smile_big:

Serious answer: I know you're right of course. Just winding up the Scots a bit!

Also another interesting fact is that tartans applying to individual clans is also a relatively new phenomena, apparently from as late as the 1700s.
Had me going there for a minute your Lordship.
Both my in laws, born in 2 different Irish counties, never saw kilts or bagpipes till they went to their first St Patricks day parade in NY as 40ish adults.

The Irish dispora, at least in the US, must be the only group I know of who celebrate their ethnicity by wearing the uniform of the army that oppressed their forbearers. Odd?

PS: Isnt your title extinct?
 
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