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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

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It’s his “I just got fired and I don’t give a f***!” Look. He’ll hit the bar and the tie will be further loosened.

Seriously though, lapels that big on a single breasted suit (I’m guessing SB) do strike me as a bit out of proportion.
 

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Thank you for bringing this to my attention!

I too think it's a DB, and as such, a different aesthetic is in play. But even then it still doesn't look just right to my eye. I think it's relevant to note that along with very broad lapels, the shoulders are extremely soft, which I ordinarily love. But in this instance, I feel things would benefit from a slight bit more shoulder and less lapel.

Meticulous AAAC member Bespokewrinkles I believe had Steed do this jacket for him -



and I think it shows that such broad lapels appear better balanced with a little more shoulder, though they're still lightly padded.

As to the tie and collar, it illustrates the reason I don't usually tie a four-in-hand, the d**n things won't stay up!
 

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Love four in hand and double wrap four in hand depending on weight of fabric.
Never had them loosen. If it becomes a problem, a straight pin through the underside of the knot to lock it should solve it.
Thanks!

I don't have an aesthetic preference for the four-in-hand, and most often prefer the more symmetrical half-windsor. I limit the four-in-hand to thick ties which require the smallest knot, which coincidentally are mostly wool, and therefore generally don't exhibit a slippage issue.
 

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Thanks!

I don't have an aesthetic preference for the four-in-hand, and most often prefer the more symmetrical half-windsor. I limit the four-in-hand to thick ties which require the smallest knot, which coincidentally are mostly wool, and therefore generally don't exhibit a slippage issue.
Funny, in my youth I would tie the symmetrical Windsor as my preferred knot along with the reverse Windsor( I won't go into detail ) and half Windsor. But now prefer the four in hand and double wrap four in hand and its variations, perhaps because of it's asymmetrical look, I guess Freud would have a psychological term for this behavioral reversal . I prefer loosely puffed squares as well, yet, still arranged as to appear not well thought out but indeed are.
 

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Those lapels are about 4.5" wide. I like the look on a double-breasted jacket, such as Manton's jacket, but I think that they would look ridiculous on a single-breasted jacket.
Peak lapels lapels should be 5" wide on a double breasted coat and 4" wide peak lapels on a low cut single breasted coat on a person where the minimum distance from armhole to armhole is a minimum of 17.25". This is the only way for these coats to look proportionate on people.
 

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I think Manton looks sloppy in this picture. Odd that he would choose this with his general knowledge of clothing. Possibly trying too hard to be distinctive.
It's quite possible he never really knew what he was talking about, at least outside the online style world. He has as long as I can remember dressed in what I consider a "forum style" or "fashion blogger style" which has been nurtured and spread via the forums and blogs and is a hodgepodge of details and shapes that don't sit well together. It's a quasi-Savile Row look but with a bunch of other styles mashed in. I think it only makes sense within the internal logic of the forums and blogs, and not historically. These days, though, it's spread beyond the internet and can be seen quite a bit. I wonder if it's the first online-started style (excepting street style, etc, of course). Kinda like "trad" has become its own thing with only tentative links to the non-online world. I'm sure some will consider me a jerk for banding this drum, given that Manton has been a kind of saint for many people around here, but having spent too much of my life since 2005 wandering around the forums and blogs it seems clear to me that a whole style has developed, of which Manton has been a tribune, which has little to do with real-world historical or contemporary styles. Be careful with it, is my advice.
 

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Not all DB jackets have a buttonhole in both lapels, but SB jackets never have them in both.
I was pretty sure only my Anderson Sheppard had the two buttonholes. But this prompted me to look through all my double breasted jackets just for fun to double check. My suspicions were in fact confirmed. Would that make the double lapel buttonhole a more common British characteristic? Another interesting trait on that same jacket is it has double anchor buttons as well. This is the only time I have encountered this as well.
 

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I was pretty sure only my Anderson Sheppard had the two buttonholes. But this prompted me to look through all my double breasted jackets just for fun to double check. My suspicions were in fact confirmed. Would that make the double lapel buttonhole a more common British characteristic? Another interesting trait on that same jacket is it has double anchor buttons as well. This is the only time I have encountered this as well.
I have British, American and Italian double-breasted jackets with buttonholes in both lapels. Anderson & Sheppard wants to give you the option to fasten only at the bottom button, which most suits are too stiffly constructed to be able to have multiple fastening options.
 
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